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Author Topic: Extreme weather  (Read 57957 times)

Robert Roaldi

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Re: Extreme weather
« Reply #1180 on: December 17, 2019, 12:22:27 pm »

Robert, you occasionally make sensible comments that even I can agree with. But here, you just got off the deep end.

Oh good, I'd hate it if you agreed with me too often.  ;)
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Robert Roaldi

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Re: Extreme weather
« Reply #1181 on: December 17, 2019, 12:24:23 pm »

New York's loss is Virginia's gain.   Lower taxes in Texas and Florida draws businesses from Higher taxed states like California New York and new Jersey.   What Robert doesn't get that Slobo tried to explain to him is that reducing taxes is not a subsidy.   It's letting people and companies keep more of the money they earned.   Money that the government never earned or had an intrinsic ownership of.


How does your support of tax relief/concession/suspension/subsidy/whatever mesh with your often stated view that government should not try to pick winners?
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Robert

Jeremy Roussak

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Re: Extreme weather
« Reply #1182 on: December 17, 2019, 12:41:07 pm »

Historical perspective is always good, the western US and water: https://getpocket.com/explore/item/how-the-west-was-lost.

I've made it clear before now that posts which include links to external sites must explain what the link illustrates and why it should be read. See here.

Jeremy
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Robert Roaldi

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Re: Extreme weather
« Reply #1183 on: December 17, 2019, 12:45:12 pm »

I've made it clear before now that posts which include links to external sites must explain what the link illustrates and why it should be read. See here.

Jeremy

Well I thought I had given enough of a hint at the content without being too long-winded, but ok, understood. The article's own sub-title might have served your purpose, I think.
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Alan Klein

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Re: Extreme weather
« Reply #1184 on: December 17, 2019, 11:45:17 pm »


How does your support of tax relief/concession/suspension/subsidy/whatever mesh with your often stated view that government should not try to pick winners?
Picking winners is when NYS subsidizes a particular industry like the solar panel industry rather than leaving them to compete with other power industries.

What's happening here with Amazon is NYS is incentivizing companies to move to NY and set up shop.   Any company.   There are incentives granted to all companies.   It is true that Amazon got a special deal because of the number of jobs they promised.  But NYS is competing with all other states to get their business.   But it is strictly driven by economic benefit to New York State.   Playing favorites is done for political reasons.

LesPalenik

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Re: Extreme weather
« Reply #1185 on: January 04, 2020, 12:19:27 am »

Warmer weather has been benefiting man since the Ice Age ended.  Why wouldn't a little more warming continue to help?

Little warming wouldn't hurt, especially in the northern states. But the evidence shows that we are getting more heat than bargained for.

Quote
We see the effects in melting ice, burning forests, warming oceans and heat waves, like the one in France this summer that killed 1,500 people. Qatar has become so hot it has started air conditioning the outside, and record-breaking heat waves in India and Pakistan caused temperatures approaching 124 degrees Fahrenheit in some places.

Heat is the number-one weather killer in the U.S., causing up to 1,500 deaths a year, more deaths than hurricanes, floods or tornadoes. By midcentury, if action isn’t taken, the U.S. can expect the number of days where temperatures exceed 105 degrees to triple.

Heat can have devastating impacts on the body, including heat stress, heat stroke and links to chronic kidney disease. It exacerbates existing conditions such as heart and respiratory diseases. It can also lead to premature births, which can have a significant impact on the long-term health of the child.

“Extreme heat is among the deadliest weather hazards society faces,” reads the “Killer Heat” report published by the UCS. “It is possible [heat extremes] will affect daily life for the average U.S. resident more than any other facet of climate change.”

https://www.huffingtonpost.ca/entry/environment-heat-wave-climate-change-elections_n_5def87d7e4b05d1e8a57cb90?ri18n=true
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Ray

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Re: Extreme weather
« Reply #1186 on: January 04, 2020, 01:10:14 am »

Quote
Heat is the number-one weather killer in the U.S., causing up to 1,500 deaths a year, more deaths than hurricanes, floods or tornadoes. By midcentury, if action isn’t taken, the U.S. can expect the number of days where temperatures exceed 105 degrees to triple.

Les,
That's very strange! How did those ancient Egyptians cope? They lived in a very hot and arid region with summertime temperatures often above 40 degrees C. They didn't have air-conditioning, or vehicles and cranes, yet succeeded in building impressively massive Pyramids, dragging huge blocks of stone several kilometres, and created one of the most impressive ancient civilizations on Earth.

Do you think perhaps in this modern era we have become too 'namby pamby'.   ;D
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Alan Klein

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Re: Extreme weather
« Reply #1187 on: January 04, 2020, 01:12:02 am »

2 degree increase up in Canada might be appreciated even though they aren't building pyramids.  :)

Rob C

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Re: Extreme weather
« Reply #1188 on: January 04, 2020, 04:43:10 am »

Les,
That's very strange! How did those ancient Egyptians cope? They lived in a very hot and arid region with summertime temperatures often above 40 degrees C. They didn't have air-conditioning, or vehicles and cranes, yet succeeded in building impressively massive Pyramids, dragging huge blocks of stone several kilometres, and created one of the most impressive ancient civilizations on Earth.

Do you think perhaps in this modern era we have become too 'namby pamby'.   ;D

They did it, Ray, by using slaves, expendable people whose deaths didn't matter for as long as they could be replaced by more of the same. Much like the cotton fields, then. Or the concentration camps of WW2.

Ray

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Re: Extreme weather
« Reply #1189 on: January 04, 2020, 05:17:24 am »

They did it, Ray, by using slaves, expendable people whose deaths didn't matter for as long as they could be replaced by more of the same. Much like the cotton fields, then. Or the concentration camps of WW2.

Are you sure, Rob? You trust the BBC, don't you?  ;)
Have a look at the following article.

http://www.bbc.co.uk/history/ancient/egyptians/pyramid_builders_01.shtml

"Almost every family in Egypt was either directly or indirectly involved in pyramid building. The pyramid labourers were clearly not slaves. They may well have been the unwilling victims of the corvée or compulsory labour system, the system that allowed the pharaoh to compel his people to work for three or four month shifts on state projects. If this is the case, we may imagine that they were selected at random from local registers.

But, in a complete reversal of the story of oppression told by Herodotus, Lehner and Hawass have suggested that the labourers may have been volunteers. Zahi Hawass believes that the symbolism of the pyramid was already strong enough to encourage people to volunteer for the supreme national project. Mark Lehner has gone further, comparing pyramid building to American Amish barn raising, which is done on a volunteer basis. He might equally well have compared it to the staffing of archaeological digs, which tend to be manned by enthusiastic, unpaid volunteers supervised by a few paid professionals."
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Slobodan Blagojevic

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Re: Extreme weather
« Reply #1190 on: January 04, 2020, 05:51:26 am »

They did it, Ray, by using slaves, expendable people whose deaths didn't matter for as long as they could be replaced by more of the same. Much like the cotton fields, then. Or the concentration camps of WW2.

Dear Rob, you seem to be transitioning faster and faster to the dark side? What’s up with all that cynicism?

LesPalenik

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Re: Extreme weather
« Reply #1191 on: January 04, 2020, 09:02:02 am »

2 degree increase up in Canada might be appreciated even though they aren't building pyramids.  :)

Not pyramides, but much smaller structures, called igloos. In high Arctic, the igloos used to last till mid May, but in 2 degree warmer temperatures,  they will now collapse around the March equinox.

Also many ice fishing huts on the southern lakes are falling through the weakened ice by that time. Although some manage to stay afloat through the whole summer.



https://www.sootoday.com/around-ontario/ontario-ice-hut-still-floating-on-lake-in-sudbury-six-months-after-thaw-1823547

 
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LesPalenik

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Re: Extreme weather
« Reply #1192 on: January 04, 2020, 09:14:14 am »

Les,
That's very strange! How did those ancient Egyptians cope? They lived in a very hot and arid region with summertime temperatures often above 40 degrees C. They didn't have air-conditioning, or vehicles and cranes, yet succeeded in building impressively massive Pyramids, dragging huge blocks of stone several kilometres, and created one of the most impressive ancient civilizations on Earth.

Do you think perhaps in this modern era we have become too 'namby pamby'.   ;D

Yes, Ray, in the modern era, due to the higher summer temperatures and more namby-pamby seniors alive hot summer days can indeed inflict a serious damage.  I find, it's hard to exercise and do stretches when the weather gets really hot.
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Bart_van_der_Wolf

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Re: Extreme weather
« Reply #1193 on: January 04, 2020, 11:56:44 am »

Let's not forget that an average global temperature rise of 2 degrees can be a much larger increase locally, especially in the Northern hemisphere (on land).
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Frans Waterlander

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Re: Extreme weather
« Reply #1194 on: January 04, 2020, 12:17:28 pm »

Let's not forget that an average global temperature rise of 2 degrees can be a much larger increase locally, especially in the Northern hemisphere (on land).
Yes, Bart, and the sky is falling, but it can fall much faster locally.
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Robert Roaldi

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Re: Extreme weather
« Reply #1195 on: January 04, 2020, 12:20:01 pm »

2 degree increase up in Canada might be appreciated even though they aren't building pyramids.  :)

You've mentioned the potential benefits of increases in temperature in Canada before, albeit maybe in jest. You realize that it might be accompanied by turning Iowa into a desert. Would that be ok?

Funny how we've gone from man-induced climate being impossible, if not a hoax, to now wondering if climate change might be a good thing. Seems irresponsible to not also consider that it might also be a bad thing. Shouldn't you want to study that a bit more before making any assumptions either way?
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Alan Klein

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Re: Extreme weather
« Reply #1196 on: January 04, 2020, 04:00:34 pm »

You've mentioned the potential benefits of increases in temperature in Canada before, albeit maybe in jest. You realize that it might be accompanied by turning Iowa into a desert. Would that be ok?

Funny how we've gone from man-induced climate being impossible, if not a hoax, to now wondering if climate change might be a good thing. Seems irresponsible to not also consider that it might also be a bad thing. Shouldn't you want to study that a bit more before making any assumptions either way?
Iowa?  Where's Iowa?

Meanwhile American firm Tesla is helping the wastrel Chinese reduce their pollution and CO2 production despite their refusal to help the rest of the Paris signatories as Tesla expands its electric automobile facilities in China.
https://insideevs.com/news/391035/tesla-model-3-production-3000-week/

And American oil companies expand their oil production from the largest in the world to even larger putting more wastrel coal companies out of business. 
https://www.houstonchronicle.com/business/energy/article/Reporter-s-Notebook-Will-13-million-barrels-a-14946242.php

Who needs Paris anyway?



https://insideevs.com/news/391035/tesla-model-3-production-3000-week/

Rob C

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Re: Extreme weather
« Reply #1197 on: January 04, 2020, 04:00:59 pm »

Dear Rob, you seem to be transitioning faster and faster to the dark side? What’s up with all that cynicism?


I had my two sets of cataracts removed; remember?

 https://m.youtube.com/watch?v=MrHxhQPOO2c

:-)

Rob C

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Re: Extreme weather
« Reply #1198 on: January 04, 2020, 04:16:12 pm »

Are you sure, Rob? You trust the BBC, don't you?  ;)
Have a look at the following article.

http://www.bbc.co.uk/history/ancient/egyptians/pyramid_builders_01.shtml

"Almost every family in Egypt was either directly or indirectly involved in pyramid building. The pyramid labourers were clearly not slaves. They may well have been the unwilling victims of the corvée or compulsory labour system, the system that allowed the pharaoh to compel his people to work for three or four month shifts on state projects. If this is the case, we may imagine that they were selected at random from local registers.

But, in a complete reversal of the story of oppression told by Herodotus, Lehner and Hawass have suggested that the labourers may have been volunteers. Zahi Hawass believes that the symbolism of the pyramid was already strong enough to encourage people to volunteer for the supreme national project. Mark Lehner has gone further, comparing pyramid building to American Amish barn raising, which is done on a volunteer basis. He might equally well have compared it to the staffing of archaeological digs, which tend to be manned by enthusiastic, unpaid volunteers supervised by a few paid professionals."


The "temporary workers" were indeed slaves: they were paid in kind: food, just like in the cotton fields.

If you are willing to believe that payment in food alone is not slavery, then there was no slavery in Belsen, none in the USA, either, so we can all relax and have a cup of tea and declare that it was all just a huge misunderstanding, and that we can now re-erect all those statues that we pulled down.

:-)

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