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Author Topic: Love those Trees  (Read 801493 times)

EduPerez

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Love those Trees
« Reply #120 on: January 11, 2010, 04:49:09 pm »

Quote from: tim wolcott
Here are the rest of the images.  I'm in morning about the Packers loss.

Some very good photographs. By the way, is that waterfall a (vertical) panorama, too? I would never have dared to do a panorama on a moving subject, amazing.
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stevenf

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« Reply #121 on: January 11, 2010, 05:50:56 pm »

I thought I would add some of non-pan images to this post.

Steven

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tim wolcott

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« Reply #122 on: January 13, 2010, 04:24:09 pm »

I not sure why you say you would not ever do a panorama on a moving object.  Wether its vertical or horizontal don't understand why you think they should be shot different.  Its much hard to get perfect reference for shooting stitching on vert pano.  Which part are you saying is moving.  The water or the dogwood.  Glad you like it, I tried to shoot it like Japanese silk screen.  Tim


Quote from: EduPerez
Some very good photographs. By the way, is that waterfall a (vertical) panorama, too? I would never have dared to do a panorama on a moving subject, amazing.
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EduPerez

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« Reply #123 on: January 14, 2010, 02:44:06 am »

Quote from: tim wolcott
I not sure why you say you would not ever do a panorama on a moving object.  Wether its vertical or horizontal don't understand why you think they should be shot different.  Its much hard to get perfect reference for shooting stitching on vert pano.  Which part are you saying is moving.  The water or the dogwood.

My fear with moving objects is that stitching the photographs later may become painful: if some object that was near the edge in one photograph changes position before I make the next one; then I have to manually mask certain areas, or use extensive cloning, or... . I have a panorama made at Vienna where the same couple appears twice.

In this particular case, I was talking about the water, but now that I think about it, the effect of the long exposure on the water probably minimizes this issue.

Quote from: tim wolcott
Glad you like it, I tried to shoot it like Japanese silk screen.  Tim

I like it, but I prefer the last one...
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LoisWakeman

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« Reply #124 on: January 14, 2010, 01:09:03 pm »

Steven: One word : WOW!
« Last Edit: January 14, 2010, 01:10:02 pm by LoisWakeman »
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Eric Myrvaagnes

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« Reply #125 on: January 14, 2010, 01:38:52 pm »

Quote from: LoisWakeman
Steven: One word : WOW!

+1
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tim wolcott

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« Reply #126 on: January 14, 2010, 02:14:42 pm »

The last one was shot in Sequoia, It was a stitch where I put 7 images together at 5.5 sec exposures.  It took nearly 3 plus hours to get just the right set of clouds to moves slowly through the forest.  The cloud had to be in the background and moving very slowly.  I got 680 meg files from this stitch.  I could have shot this with my 28mm on my Phase one system but then it would have been a sliver.

But to answer your problem of people moving is to shoot opposite of the way people are moving when stitching.  If you have them overlapping then wait a bit the shoot your pano crop the images so the people only appear once.  Tim
Quote from: EduPerez
My fear with moving objects is that stitching the photographs later may become painful: if some object that was near the edge in one photograph changes position before I make the next one; then I have to manually mask certain areas, or use extensive cloning, or... . I have a panorama made at Vienna where the same couple appears twice.

In this particular case, I was talking about the water, but now that I think about it, the effect of the long exposure on the water probably minimizes this issue.



I like it, but I prefer the last one...
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eleanorbrown

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« Reply #127 on: January 14, 2010, 05:36:33 pm »

I have really been enjoying this topic...I love trees and enjoy seeing what others are doing with trees.  I'm working on a new series called "Beyond the Forest" shot with a Canon converted for IR use and shot into the sun but with the sun behind a tree trunk or branches.  This series was shot in the middle in Houston at a sanctuary near my home.

great work everyone! Eleanor



[attachment=19459:beyondforest.jpg]
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mattpallante

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« Reply #128 on: January 14, 2010, 06:03:19 pm »

Quote from: eleanorbrown
I have really been enjoying this topic...I love trees and enjoy seeing what others are doing with trees.  I'm working on a new series called "Beyond the Forest" shot with a Canon converted for IR use and shot into the sun but with the sun behind a tree trunk or branches.  This series was shot in the middle in Houston at a sanctuary near my home.

great work everyone! Eleanor



[attachment=19459:beyondforest.jpg]
Eleanor, beautiful image! I love the way the vignetting adds to the depth of the image, and mirrors your "beyond the forest" idea. This image gives me that feeling of yearning, and wondering what's just up ahead, and wanting to reach towards that wonder. Matt
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eleanorbrown

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« Reply #129 on: January 14, 2010, 06:21:42 pm »

Yes Matt, you got the idea behind the series.  I can only stay in this 3rd largest city in the US just so long and have to get out to the natural landscape (I'm primarily a landscape photographer).  This sanctuary (in the center of Houston)  is 7 minutes from my home...155 acres of forest and ponds and is not crowded with people.  I did this series walking my yellow lab and hand holding my canon!  Houston is overrun with no zoning high rise development and urban sprawl and the images in this series show the  "balance" needed for such a large city!  eleanor



Quote from: mattpallante
Eleanor, beautiful image! I love the way the vignetting adds to the depth of the image, and mirrors your "beyond the forest" idea. This image gives me that feeling of yearning, and wondering what's just up ahead, and wanting to reach towards that wonder. Matt
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John R

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« Reply #130 on: January 14, 2010, 07:42:57 pm »

I have one more, not the usual stuff, but a winter beauty that reminds me of Christmas lights on outdoor trees. And a second more abstract tree; but does it matter.

JMR
« Last Edit: January 14, 2010, 09:22:09 pm by John R »
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Eric Myrvaagnes

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« Reply #131 on: January 15, 2010, 12:10:50 am »

I love the way Eleanor and John are both stretching reality, but in very different directions. Both ways of seeing make me want to come back to them over and over. Thank you both!

Eric

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stevenf

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« Reply #132 on: January 15, 2010, 12:17:01 pm »

Just for fun - I thought I would add in some of my abstract tree imagery.  I really enjoy creating these images.

Eric and Lois Thanks for your kind feedback.

Steven

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John R

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« Reply #133 on: January 15, 2010, 12:46:03 pm »

Quote from: stevenf
Just for fun - I thought I would add in some of my abstract tree imagery.  I really enjoy creating these images.

Eric and Lois Thanks for your kind feedback.

Steven

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That's an excellent series, Steven.

JMR
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Eric Myrvaagnes

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« Reply #134 on: January 15, 2010, 04:48:50 pm »

Quote from: John R
That's an excellent series, Steven.

JMR

It sure is!


Eric

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mattpallante

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« Reply #135 on: January 16, 2010, 05:27:32 pm »

Last Autumn, head up, eyes in the sky...Matt[attachment=19500:autumn_y...4918_lzn.jpg]
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Justan

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« Reply #136 on: January 17, 2010, 10:44:34 am »

Quote from: tim wolcott
The last one was shot in Sequoia, It was a stitch where I put 7 images together at 5.5 sec exposures.  It took nearly 3 plus hours to get just the right set of clouds to move slowly through the forest.  The cloud had to be in the background and moving very slowly.  I got 680 meg files from this stitch.  I could have shot this with my 28mm on my Phase one system but then it would have been a sliver.

Are you saying that you took different parts of that over 3 hours?

tim wolcott

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« Reply #137 on: January 17, 2010, 03:36:08 pm »

No it took 3 hours for a cloud to move into the forest that was only in the background where I wanted it that was moving slow enough to shoot it correctly.  The problem with the shot is that I was shooting 160 degrees and the clouds needed to be big enough that I could finish the seven shot with the same lighting on all parts of the images.  I shoot also with a Phase One camera and if you shoot for 5.5 seconds you have to wait for 5.5 seconds to write the image.  so the cloud had to move so slow that it took 1.5 minutes to shoot the whole series.  Hope that helps.  

I could have shot this with my wide angle but then it would be a small strip of the whole frame.  So by shooting this with a longer lens on the vertical shot My file size is know 860 megs.  So I shoot my Phase like an old banquet camera when stitching an image, but I get to choose the focal length to fit exactly the scene.  Glad you like it.  Tim
Quote from: Justan
Are you saying that you took different parts of that over 3 hours?
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dwood

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« Reply #138 on: January 17, 2010, 08:33:51 pm »

tree, spent corn field, winter

« Last Edit: January 17, 2010, 09:36:15 pm by dwood »
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tim wolcott

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« Reply #139 on: January 19, 2010, 10:14:34 pm »

I really like the feeling and mood.  Its amazing the stark feeling winter can play.  Its either very moody or very elegant based on the kind of snow and where its shot.  T


Quote from: dwood
tree, spent corn field, winter

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