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Author Topic: Love those Trees  (Read 801389 times)

dwood

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Love those Trees
« Reply #140 on: January 19, 2010, 11:21:37 pm »

Thanks Tim. "Moody" and "elegant" are fitting descriptions of Winter scenes, I think. Winter is one of the most interesting seasons to shoot. I really enjoy it...don't even mind the cold.

tim wolcott

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« Reply #141 on: January 20, 2010, 01:34:50 am »

I agree, the is just another part of the pains one go through to capture nature at its finest.  I will be shooting many different places this year in the snow.  I have always wanted to shoot white on white.  The major difficulty is getting just the right concentration of trees that fall away at just the right distances.  But like anything it takes patience and dedication to find this exact scene.  Of course these days I envision finding elegant places in white, it just the style that my mind is seeing.  I'm always drawing and constructing vision I hope and one day will find.

I'm glad you posted this image, it will refresh my mind to think about what I may be able to find in that stark feeling.  I love what Michael Kenna has done with stark and also made them sometimes elegant.  Tim

Quote from: dwood
Thanks Tim. "Moody" and "elegant" are fitting descriptions of Winter scenes, I think. Winter is one of the most interesting seasons to shoot. I really enjoy it...don't even mind the cold.

You can see the rest at www.galleryoftheamericanlandscape.com
« Last Edit: February 02, 2010, 10:07:20 pm by tim wolcott »
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JamiePeters

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« Reply #142 on: January 20, 2010, 03:42:29 pm »

Doug I find your image very interesting.  The thought of once was there and the rebirth of spring and what might be there.  A sense of emptyness.  JP
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John R

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« Reply #143 on: January 20, 2010, 04:01:22 pm »

Quote from: dwood
tree, spent corn field, winter
Very nice; really like the gray band at the top. Noticed you comments on winter, but you will have to agree, the exposures are tough even when you know what you are doing. The slightest nuance, either way, can overexpose or muddy the snowy elements.

JMR
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dwood

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« Reply #144 on: January 20, 2010, 07:22:50 pm »

Thanks Jamie and John. I'm glad you like the picture.

Justan

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« Reply #145 on: January 21, 2010, 10:08:16 am »

Quote from: tim wolcott
No it took 3 hours for a cloud to move into the forest that was only in the background where I wanted it that was moving slow enough to shoot it correctly.  The problem with the shot is that I was shooting 160 degrees and the clouds needed to be big enough that I could finish the seven shot with the same lighting on all parts of the images.  I shoot also with a Phase One camera and if you shoot for 5.5 seconds you have to wait for 5.5 seconds to write the image.  so the cloud had to move so slow that it took 1.5 minutes to shoot the whole series.  Hope that helps.  

I could have shot this with my wide angle but then it would be a small strip of the whole frame.  So by shooting this with a longer lens on the vertical shot My file size is know 860 megs.  So I shoot my Phase like an old banquet camera when stitching an image, but I get to choose the focal length to fit exactly the scene.  Glad you like it.  Tim


I missed your comment previously. Thanks very much for this feedback.

I'm just starting to shoot panos. I'm delighted by the results but am still working out some of the details. Maintaining uniform lighting across the pan in the forest is one of the more subtle but really telling issues. I'm hoping to find a guide for some of the post photo processing used when shooting panos - do you know of any good books on the topic?

tim wolcott

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« Reply #146 on: January 21, 2010, 07:41:19 pm »

No I find there is nothing out there to read.  However I have been talking to Mac Group about doing a video on me shooting pano's.  But shooting panoramas in the forest is very very difficult the forest must be perfectly spaced in order for that to place.  I have been studying this at great detail to see what I can get away with.  I try to think of the panoramas I want to shoot by using a antique banquet camera.  Don't read the really right stuff explanation on how to shoot pano's.  I show them in person that they are teaching the wrong way to shoot pano's.  I hope sometime in the future of launching my workshops with Michael in the next weeks.  

I started to shoot pano's because it was a way to minimize the effect of small detail far away from the camera getting blurry due to chip design.  I am in the process of helping design a new head for tripods for pano stitching.  The best way to shoot panoramas is to compose your image with a framing card and then pick the lens to match the scene so your perspective does not change.  I hope I said that clear enough if not please feel free to call me.  I'm in a major blizzard at the moment.  I will be shooting some pano snow scenes when its all over.  Tim 9517411674 cell home 9095841720

Quote from: Justan
I missed your comment previously. Thanks very much for this feedback.

I'm just starting to shoot panos. I'm delighted by the results but am still working out some of the details. Maintaining uniform lighting across the pan in the forest is one of the more subtle but really telling issues. I'm hoping to find a guide for some of the post photo processing used when shooting panos - do you know of any good books on the topic?
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mattpallante

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« Reply #147 on: January 23, 2010, 04:52:54 pm »

along the river I saw this mummy[attachment=19691:mummyman.jpg]
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wolfnowl

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« Reply #148 on: January 24, 2010, 03:56:11 pm »

Well seen!  And captured!

A couple more...

[attachment=19715:DSCF6744_blend.jpg] [attachment=19716:DSCF6747_blend.jpg]
[attachment=19717:DSCF6769.jpg] [attachment=19718:DSCF6799.jpg]
[attachment=19719:DSCF6816_2.jpg] [attachment=19720:DSCF6780.jpg]

Okay, so the last one is obviously a leaf FROM a tulip tree, but I kinda like how it turned out.

Mike.
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mattpallante

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« Reply #149 on: January 24, 2010, 04:51:00 pm »

Quote from: wolfnowl
Well seen!  And captured!

A couple more...

[attachment=19715:DSCF6744_blend.jpg] [attachment=19716:DSCF6747_blend.jpg]
[attachment=19717:DSCF6769.jpg] [attachment=19718:DSCF6799.jpg]
[attachment=19719:DSCF6816_2.jpg] [attachment=19720:DSCF6780.jpg]

Okay, so the last one is obviously a leaf FROM a tulip tree, but I kinda like how it turned out.

Mike.
Mike, I love the "skin" on the first one. What kind of tree is it?

 Matt
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wolfnowl

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« Reply #150 on: January 25, 2010, 01:45:04 am »

Hi Matt:  The first (and fifth) images are arbutus trees.  Keep their leaves, shed their bark.  Really beautiful colours after a rain.  And according to a woodturner we met recently, VERY hard wood.

Mike.

P.S.  The 2nd, 3rd, 4th are garry oak.  They have such wonderful shapes to them.
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BlasR

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« Reply #151 on: January 26, 2010, 01:54:58 pm »

here is my naked tree.  brockton,ma
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Justan

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« Reply #152 on: January 26, 2010, 03:14:45 pm »

Quote from: tim wolcott

> No I find there is nothing out there to read. However I have been talking to Mac Group about doing a video on me shooting pano's. But shooting panoramas in the forest is very very difficult the forest must be perfectly spaced in order for that to place. I have been studying this at great detail to see what I can get away with. I try to think of the panoramas I want to shoot by using a antique banquet camera. Don't read the really right stuff explanation on how to shoot pano's. I show them in person that they are teaching the wrong way to shoot pano's. I hope sometime in the future of launching my workshops with Michael in the next weeks.

I look foreword to seeing the video & the workshops. I'm always interested in compositional elements, and in the work flow. I never have the time to go to workshops. Itís a failing of my career path. Dealing with the varying light that always comes into play is the biggest issue. One of your most notable traits is a fine eye at bringing out subtle colors. This is another area I think many would like to learn more about Ė I sure would!

I'm also finding that producing panos makes for a number of challenges on the front of getting the image mounted and framed.

> I started to shoot pano's because it was a way to minimize the effect of small detail far away from the camera getting blurry due to chip design.

My entry into panos was in a large part due to that, and also because itís an innovative way to get much higher resolution images, while using the same equipment. This brings savings and also maintains portability of the equipment. I canít rationalize buying a MF camera and a 40 MP (or larger) back, and even if I did, this kind of stuff is too heavy for most of my outings. So stitching solves a number of problems.

> The best way to shoot panoramas is to compose your image with a framing card and then pick the lens to match the scene so your perspective does not change. I hope I said that clear enough if not please feel free to call me. I'm in a major blizzard at the moment. I will be shooting some pano snow scenes
when its all over.

Thanks! You said that very well. I'm a little jealous because we haven't gotten much snow in the valley this season. Of course, last year at this time we had nearly 5í on the ground (and on the roofs) so I'm okay without that. But now that I'm playing with panos I want to snow shoe into some of the OG and continue to experiment! Oh well, it's winter in the mtns and the snow will come.
« Last Edit: January 26, 2010, 03:20:10 pm by Justan »
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stevenf

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« Reply #153 on: January 26, 2010, 03:15:19 pm »

I thought I would add some more of my panoramas of trees. These were taken with either a Horseman 617 or a Hasselblad XPAN with Velvia 50 film.

I hope you like these ones.

Steven

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wolfnowl

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« Reply #154 on: January 26, 2010, 03:46:30 pm »

Quote from: BlasR
here is my naked tree.  brockton,ma
Love the clouds, and that beautiful old maple, but I could do without the pine(?) tufts on the left edge of the frame.

Mike.
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wolfnowl

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« Reply #155 on: January 26, 2010, 03:48:36 pm »

Quote from: stevenf
I thought I would add some more of my panoramas of trees. These were taken with either a Horseman 617 or a Hasselblad XPAN with Velvia 50 film.
Some nice work Steven.  Thanks for sharing them!

Mike.
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tim wolcott

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« Reply #156 on: January 30, 2010, 08:43:43 pm »

After 6 feet of snow and about million hours of digging the cars out of the snow.  I managed to get up on top of Onyx Summit.  I went there for 2 days straight trying to get this very first images.  By the way froze my jewels off waiting for hours upon hours to get this oriental looking ancient Juniper tree.  I chose to shoot this ancient tree in the snow with a long exposure to soften the scene and make it look like its silky.

The second one is a stitch of 7 images show with the Phase p45 camera.  But its really for the tourist who want Big Bear images.  Tim
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JamiePeters

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« Reply #157 on: February 01, 2010, 10:58:39 pm »

Looks like you had alot of snot up there.  I live in LA, these also are very nice.  The first one does look asian in style.  JP
Quote from: tim wolcott
After 6 feet of snow and about million hours of digging the cars out of the snow.  I managed to get up on top of Onyx Summit.  I went there for 2 days straight trying to get this very first images.  By the way froze my jewels off waiting for hours upon hours to get this oriental looking ancient Juniper tree.  I chose to shoot this ancient tree in the snow with a long exposure to soften the scene and make it look like its silky.

The second one is a stitch of 7 images show with the Phase p45 camera.  But its really for the tourist who want Big Bear images.  Tim
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wolfnowl

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« Reply #158 on: February 02, 2010, 10:51:56 am »

Quote from: tim wolcott
After 6 feet of snow and about million hours of digging the cars out of the snow.  I managed to get up on top of Onyx Summit.  I went there for 2 days straight trying to get this very first images.  By the way froze my jewels off waiting for hours upon hours to get this oriental looking ancient Juniper tree.  I chose to shoot this ancient tree in the snow with a long exposure to soften the scene and make it look like its silky.

The second one is a stitch of 7 images show with the Phase p45 camera.  But its really for the tourist who want Big Bear images.  Tim

Love the first one, Tim!  The second one's good too!

Mike.
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seamus finn

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« Reply #159 on: February 02, 2010, 12:43:35 pm »


The work on this thread is incredible and Tim is an inspiration.

Seamus
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