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Author Topic: Best way to restore a Z3200 contaminated by non-hp ink?  (Read 998 times)

Kyle D Jackson

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Best way to restore a Z3200 contaminated by non-hp ink?
« on: July 08, 2022, 12:08:43 pm »

Hi, wondering if anyone has any suggestions for this situation... I am a Z3100 owner and I have the chance to get a Z3200ps rev B essentially for free, but the owner tried some random non-hp heads and inks in it and "can't get it to work anymore" {face palm}

My question is what's the best way to flush that crap out of the printer so I can put in proper HP heads and inks? If I simply install new ones, my concern is there would still be some of the old ink in the tubes that would get pushed through the new heads, and that doesn't sound good for the new heads. So should I purge the old ink from the system entirely somehow first?

Searched around and couldn't find any info on how to "decontaminate" a printer like this. Found lots of info about purging out "stale" HP ink/heads of course (which I've done lots with my z3100), and lots of people asking about using non-hp inks, but so far I found no info about how to fix it after somebody did that to their printer.

Thanks!
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Kyle D Jackson
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deanwork

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Re: Best way to restore a Z3200 contaminated by non-hp ink?
« Reply #1 on: July 08, 2022, 03:10:17 pm »

There used to be third party Z3200 ink carts that I believe were refillable that you could put flush fluid in. Here you go, just found them on eBay, don’t know if they are available elsewhere…


https://www.ebay.com/itm/193085139824

. There are also third party Chinese  inks that functioned normally but did not have good longevity . If that’s what was in there they weren’t gunk and if you put good Hp inks and heads in there you could just print color targets with plan bond paper to flush it all out. The cone piezo flush solution works really well but those damn bright pink dyes in them take forever to get out of the light channels like yellow.

Might try MIS Associates ( ink supply.com ) .  If it were me I’d buy this and the refillable carts .

https://www.inksupply.com/product-details/pn/MIS-FLUID-GL.html?printerID=0

John




Hi, wondering if anyone has any suggestions for this situation... I am a Z3100 owner and I have the chance to get a Z3200ps rev B essentially for free, but the owner tried some random non-hp heads and inks in it and "can't get it to work anymore" {face palm}

My question is what's the best way to flush that crap out of the printer so I can put in proper HP heads and inks? If I simply install new ones, my concern is there would still be some of the old ink in the tubes that would get pushed through the new heads, and that doesn't sound good for the new heads. So should I purge the old ink from the system entirely somehow first?

Searched around and couldn't find any info on how to "decontaminate" a printer like this. Found lots of info about purging out "stale" HP ink/heads of course (which I've done lots with my z3100), and lots of people asking about using non-hp inks, but so far I found no info about how to fix it after somebody did that to their printer.

Thanks!
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Kyle D Jackson

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Re: Best way to restore a Z3200 contaminated by non-hp ink?
« Reply #2 on: July 08, 2022, 04:33:17 pm »

Hi John, thanks for that info. I don't know yet what brand of ink and heads they tried, they just said "cheap ink from China" (and I haven't seen the printer in person yet).

So it seems to be a choice between pushing the remainder of this unknown ink thru brand new hp heads, or pushing the cleaning fluid through brand new heads. Either way I'm concerned about contaminating a brand new set of heads ($700 in Canada). I just don't know what's in those inks they bought, I mean it could be water and food dye, who knows (ok, probably not, but you get the point).

And it's obviously going to burn a bunch of good HP ink and paper before I can be sure it's delivering pure hp ink consistently enough again to trust it for cal/profiling.

I also reached out to LPS and they also suggested either simply running the old ink out through new HP heads, or using the syringe primer tool to draw the old ink out first. The latter sounds like a good option to me, because it will minimize any mystery ink getting into brand new heads. I would just need to figure out how much ink I need to draw from each line to be sure the old ink is gone and the new ink has reached the head carriage.

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Kyle D Jackson
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deanwork

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Re: Best way to restore a Z3200 contaminated by non-hp ink?
« Reply #3 on: July 08, 2022, 10:27:09 pm »

If you can push the old ink out first that would be ideal.

I’ve never heard of cloned Z heads, that’s a new one on me.





Hi John, thanks for that info. I don't know yet what brand of ink and heads they tried, they just said "cheap ink from China" (and I haven't seen the printer in person yet).

So it seems to be a choice between pushing the remainder of this unknown ink thru brand new hp heads, or pushing the cleaning fluid through brand new heads. Either way I'm concerned about contaminating a brand new set of heads ($700 in Canada). I just don't know what's in those inks they bought, I mean it could be water and food dye, who knows (ok, probably not, but you get the point).

And it's obviously going to burn a bunch of good HP ink and paper before I can be sure it's delivering pure hp ink consistently enough again to trust it for cal/profiling.

I also reached out to LPS and they also suggested either simply running the old ink out through new HP heads, or using the syringe primer tool to draw the old ink out first. The latter sounds like a good option to me, because it will minimize any mystery ink getting into brand new heads. I would just need to figure out how much ink I need to draw from each line to be sure the old ink is gone and the new ink has reached the head carriage.
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dgberg

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Re: Best way to restore a Z3200 contaminated by non-hp ink?
« Reply #4 on: July 09, 2022, 05:51:43 am »

Not sure I would be too quick to shade all the third party inks. Have had the z3200 going on 4 years and maybe use it for a print or two every other month. (Backup to our Epson fleet)
We started using the LD inks and they just last and last with no issues. I have maybe done a half dozen nozzle checks and two cleans in four years total. Wish my Epson's ran like that.
« Last Edit: July 09, 2022, 06:10:33 am by dgberg »
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Ernst Dinkla

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Re: Best way to restore a Z3200 contaminated by non-hp ink?
« Reply #5 on: July 09, 2022, 06:34:19 am »

Maybe someone knows how much ink is lost in the purge action to prime the tubes on a new printer.  The manual says that the cartridges have to be over 88% filled for that, otherwise the purge action will not happen. So about 100ml per color channel. However the inner tube radius is about 0,12cm so 0,0452cm2 area, length approx 240cm, 11ml would be enough to fill one tube.

Pulling HP inks through per tube. Use a 60ML syringe with a tube to a salvaged head connector that connects to one tube pin in the head carriage. Not both pins connected!  I kept the orange plugs that come with a new printer and made them open for the job, see the images added. The black one is a salvaged head one that can be attached to a tube as easily.

On the other side of that ink channel you plug in a HP carts that contains at least 30ml (cart should weigh about 80 grams). Don't pull the 30ml through but less.  Too much pulled through and it is possible you suck air in the tube.

I would not pull the old ink out first and then bring in the HP original ink, which would be possible if you added just a cleaned connector of a cart in the cart bay. Nor would I bring in other fluids to 'clean' the ink channel. 

Actually I suspect a recently purchased Z3200 has some third party inks in its tubes, it came with new extra third party carts but only one on the machine. My choice is to print my own images on that machine till its fit for customers, with HP inks.

Met vriendelijke groet, Ernst

www.pigment-print.com/spectralplots/spectrumviz_1.htm
March 2017 update, 750+ inkjet media white spectral plots








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deanwork

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Re: Best way to restore a Z3200 contaminated by non-hp ink?
« Reply #6 on: July 09, 2022, 11:04:50 am »

It all depends on whether after some cleanings you have no ink coming through the nozzle check patterns. For the channels that are not coming through at all I’d put in some of my expired heads to see if the heads are what are clogged before I start running flush fluid through it. But I have a lot of old heads in case I ever needed to do that.

In my case, I had a Z3100 with a broken belt .  I quit using it for a year and was going to use it for parts. It was turned off for over a year A great HP tech came over to service my Z3200 and convinced me I should fix the Z 3100 while he was there. He accidentally broke something on the carriage so he replaced the entire carriage unit  at the same time. I think he charged me $300.00 for all of that and I have like a new printer. That was a rare situation .he didn’t want to see me abandon it.

Anyway,  I was concerned that I’d have ink dried in the lines and it would be a big messy deal to restore it.  He said no, the lines are completely sealed from the heads to the ink carts. He was right, I only had to replace two heads and they were out of date anyway. This is not true with Epson printers where ink often does dry in the lines if just sitting there where even flush fluid might not clear them.

If you don’t have any old heads you might be able to find some cheaply on eBay.

If this is decent third party  ink it might be just a matter of replacing heads that are clogged and running cheap paper through it .






Maybe someone knows how much ink is lost in the purge action to prime the tubes on a new printer.  The manual says that the cartridges have to be over 88% filled for that, otherwise the purge action will not happen. So about 100ml per color channel. However the inner tube radius is about 0,12cm so 0,0452cm2 area, length approx 240cm, 11ml would be enough to fill one tube.

Pulling HP inks through per tube. Use a 60ML syringe with a tube to a salvaged head connector that connects to one tube pin in the head carriage. Not both pins connected!  I kept the orange plugs that come with a new printer and made them open for the job, see the images added. The black one is a salvaged head one that can be attached to a tube as easily.

On the other side of that ink channel you plug in a HP carts that contains at least 30ml (cart should weigh about 80 grams). Don't pull the 30ml through but less.  Too much pulled through and it is possible you suck air in the tube.

I would not pull the old ink out first and then bring in the HP original ink, which would be possible if you added just a cleaned connector of a cart in the cart bay. Nor would I bring in other fluids to 'clean' the ink channel. 

Actually I suspect a recently purchased Z3200 has some third party inks in its tubes, it came with new extra third party carts but only one on the machine. My choice is to print my own images on that machine till its fit for customers, with HP inks.

Met vriendelijke groet, Ernst

www.pigment-print.com/spectralplots/spectrumviz_1.htm
March 2017 update, 750+ inkjet media white spectral plots
« Last Edit: July 09, 2022, 11:29:35 am by deanwork »
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Kyle D Jackson

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Re: Best way to restore a Z3200 contaminated by non-hp ink?
« Reply #7 on: July 10, 2022, 10:19:35 am »

Thanks so much John, Ernst, and Dan!  :) Sorry for the slow reply, there was a nationwide internet outage and then I was driving across country all day yesterday.

John, you're probably right about "clone heads". I probably misunderstood the owner.  They basically said "it needs new heads and inks, they tried some cheap stuff they bought online, and it didn't like it". I assumed that meant heads too, but I think you're right, it's probably still hp heads and just non-hp ink.

Ernst, great idea using those caps that way! Wish I still had those. In my case I think it is probably easier for me to buy the priming syringe pump that LPS sells.

Dan, I'm waiting to hear what ink the owner used. It sounds like it was a bad match and it wouldn't print for them. I'd rather just remove it, and that way I can rely on consistent print profiles, etc.

Originally I assumed I would install new HP ink, then use the syringe to pull out the old ink until the new ink reaches the carriage, which is kind of a guess how much to pull, then install the new heads and run a bunch of diags, purge plots, etc until the output was consistent. But now I wonder about this idea: what if I use the syringe first with no ink carts installed? I would pull the old ink thru until I get nothing but air. Yes the lines are now full of air, but ideally almost empty of old ink. Next I install the new hp ink carts and then use the syringe again to pull the air out until the new ink reaches the carriage. My understanding is this is the same method as priming a printer after new empty tubes are installed. By using this method it could reduce the potential for any mixing of the old and new inks in the tubes. Also I won't have to guess how much ink to pull, it will be obvious when the new ink reaches the carriage. That could help reduce waste of new ink.

I could do the initial test/purge prints with the old heads if they are still working, and then switch to the new heads. I like the suggestion to keep the old heads afterward in case they are helpful for stuff like this in the future. I've had good luck recovering blocked heads in my Z3100. Only the troublesome MK-R had to be replaced 3 times..., and now that I recently learned how to open and clean the capping station, I think those MKR "failures" were preventable.

Thanks so much!  :)
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Kyle D Jackson
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deanwork

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Re: Best way to restore a Z3200 contaminated by non-hp ink?
« Reply #8 on: July 10, 2022, 12:18:40 pm »

One thing I have done in the past in a pinch is to remove a problem head and put a solution of half distilled water and half alcohol on a small plastic container and soak the heads in that. That has worked for me and others. You just don’t want the water level to submerge the electronic sensor area.


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Kyle D Jackson

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Re: Best way to restore a Z3200 contaminated by non-hp ink?
« Reply #9 on: July 10, 2022, 01:09:40 pm »

One thing I have done in the past in a pinch is to remove a problem head and put a solution of half distilled water and half alcohol on a small plastic container and soak the heads in that. That has worked for me and others. You just don’t want the water level to submerge the electronic sensor area.

Yup I've done similar, especially trying to salvage MK-R heads, and had some success with it (not always). For this printer I found for sale, I honestly have no idea yet what is the state of the heads, especially with mystery ink in them, so I'm assuming to buy all new heads to be sure of good results. But if I can restore at least some of the old heads, by purging, cleaning, etc, then that would be lucky bonus, and maybe they might be worth keeping on the shelf for a future emergency. I'm just not counting on it tho when doing the math of what it will cost to get this machine running again. I think I should budget for all new heads and make my decision based on that.

Cheers
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Kyle D Jackson
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Re: Best way to restore a Z3200 contaminated by non-hp ink?
« Reply #10 on: July 12, 2022, 12:30:00 pm »

Update: I finally bought this used z3200ps I found. I'm slowly working through testing it out, cleaning heads, etc. I'm across the country so I'm literally doing this in the back of my truck lol :D just puttering with it for something to do until I get it back home.

It came with a full set of original hp heads and inks, plus a full set of "non-hp heads and inks". It turns out the "non-hp heads" are actually "remanufactured" hp heads. All the original hp stickers have been removed and replaced by ones with the name "Best" on them, and the hp logo that is stamped into the plastic on the bottom of the heads have been "burned" off (see pics). This is the first time I've encountered re-manufactured hp70 heads.

The printer seems to be rejecting these refurbished heads, and if I understand correctly, the owner was never able to get it to print with them installed. They tried 3 of them, including a hp70 MK-R head instead of a hp73 chromatic red head. Personally I don't plan to use them, so I've removed them and re-installed the original hp heads, and am slowly working through the process to get the printer to accept them.

Similarly for the "non-hp inks", it looks like they only tried 2 of them (grey and gloss enhancer). There is no brand name on the inks, so they don't appear to be the same "Best" brand as the refurbished heads. I don't think any of this non-hp ink ever got into the machine since the printer kept rejecting the refurb heads. This is good news as it means I probably don't need to waste time purging lines, or at most only have to purge 2 of them. The other 10 are still all original hp ink. The hp ink is not very old (2019-ish), so lots of good supplies to work with.

I think putting in new hp heads might be all I need, if I can't get the old hp heads unclogged. Hopeful that's the only thing wrong with it.



« Last Edit: July 12, 2022, 05:05:10 pm by Kyle D Jackson »
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Kyle D Jackson
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Re: Best way to restore a Z3200 contaminated by non-hp ink?
« Reply #11 on: July 13, 2022, 08:06:27 am »

Not sure I would be too quick to shade all the third party inks. Have had the z3200 going on 4 years and maybe use it for a print or two every other month. (Backup to our Epson fleet)
We started using the LD inks and they just last and last with no issues. I have maybe done a half dozen nozzle checks and two cleans in four years total. Wish my Epson's ran like that.

I've been running 2 identical Z300s for six years using Macro Enter inks. Each printer does about 2000 prints annually. I buy the ink in litre bottles and use refillable 280ml tanks from Alibaba. I also use OEM but "expired" printheads I buy new in unopened HP packaging on eBay for a fraction of what they cost through conventional channels. I've converted the printers once or twice back to OEM inks for troubleshooting purposes (the problem was never the inks). While I can't tell the difference between OEM and Macro Enter inks once they hit the page, the X factor is admittedly the aftermarket ink's longevity. One way or the other, I have saved many thousands of dollars over the years.


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Kyle D Jackson

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Re: Best way to restore a Z3200 contaminated by non-hp ink?
« Reply #12 on: February 23, 2024, 12:42:59 am »


Hey all, necro-ing my own thread here to give an update. The info may be useful to others who find it later...

So when I bought this rescue Z3200 printer in 2022 it was rejecting printheads, and because supply shortages I couldn't get new ones. Then a bunch of life happened, 3 moves, printer sat in storage for 1.5 years until few weeks ago. Fast forward to today and happy to report it's running again and seems to be perfectly fine now! 🥳 (Tho I'll probably give it a new belt soon.)

TL;DR on the "fix" - purge air from ink tubes, 5 brand new heads, added new seals to the heads, used really full cartridges, and done!

So I originally started this thread because I thought the printer had non-HP ink in it and I wanted to remove it. Since the previous owner couldn't get it to run because it rejected every head they tried, I suspect none of the non-HP ink ever got into the machine. (And even if some did, they only tried the grey and gloss enhancer.) So I put all the HP heads and inks back in it, but it kept refusing printheads -- which ones varied, but it was basically all of them, sometimes all at once.

LPS Computer has a great video (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=bsZ1Dqye_Lo) explaining this could be caused by air in the in inktubes, so I used their purge kit to pull any air from the lines. At least 2 or 3 definitely had quite a bit of air. But it still wouldn't accept the printheads after.

The printer passed every onboard diagnostics / service test / calibration in the service manual that I tried, which was basically all of them.

I then started testing some of the heads in my working Z3100, and vice versa. The Z3100 accepted most of the heads except 1 that it declared faulty. And I could see that the Z3100 heads I tried in the Z3200 were leaving ink on the service station, so I knew ink was flowing thru them from the printer.

This is when I learned 2 great tips for how to assess printhead health!

1) Weight! A full printhead weighs 60g. Any head significantly less than that has air in it. And air will eventually kill the printhead (thermal head burns up without ink to cool it). So by simply weighing your heads today you can assess your printheads' health. I suggest we should all be doing this 1-2 times per year, especially on low-use printers that need using the "Clean Printheads" function a lot whenever we start using them again (I speculate that this accelerates air admission into the printheads).

2) Printhead status/error codes! On the printer menu, go to the Info submenu, then Printheads. Each printhead (as well as previous printheads) will have an error code and a last status. These codes are explained in the Service Manual. For example I have an old MK-R head that the printer said was faulty. Its error code says 16402, which = codes 16384 + 16 + 2 in the service manual ( = CS comms failure + extremely high temperature + continuity failure, respectively). And its Last Status is 6, which = codes 4 + 2 in the service manual ( = shutdown, not used + continuity failure). So basically, it's fried!

I speculate that when there is 1 or more heads in the printer that are actually faulty (electrically), it can cause issues that lead to the printer randomly rejecting many/all of the heads, *including the good ones*! Without these error codes it's a guessing game which heads are bad, but with the codes and the service manual you can quickly see which heads are actually faulty!

In my case the combination of weighing, checking error codes, and testing the Z3200's heads in the Z3100, revealed that only 1 head didn't have air in it (that head was MINT actually), the rest all had significant air in them. Two I tested in the Z3100 printed only 1 colour. One was faulty (fried). So I ordered 5 brand new heads. I also ordered some ink cartridges so that I had a full set on hand that was roughly 75% or more full for each colour. See pic -- this is the fullest (and newest) ink set I've ever had since like 2010! :D MK the lowest, and only LM, LC, and PK "expired".

Incidentally, the error codes also confirmed for me that the E-G head did NOT have any non-HP ink used in it (because there is a flag code specifically for that, too).

The rest is anti-climatic... Powered up, installed the "full" cartridges when prompted, installed the heads (**with the new seal kit added from LPS Computers that's shown in the video I linked), everything accepted! Printhead alignment plot, diag plot, 2 onboard sample prints, all good! Pic of LPS seals on a head, and first print from the printer attached.

This approach of all new heads + full inks has been suggested countless times here, but what I think is revealed here (at least for me) is better informed insight into what is actually wrong. Once there is air in the heads, things are going downhill. And once there is a failed head in there, the printer can start throwing tantrums. But knowing the weights of the heads, as well as what their error codes/status are saying, will help you find out which heads are actually "good" and which are "bad", so that you're not needlessly replacing *every* head.

And those heads with air are not lost causes. They can be purged and re-primed with ink and probably run well again. (Actual faulty ones are toast, though.) So you can try like I did, all new heads if you want, and set aside the "light" ones for purging / priming to keep as spares. Or you can try purging/priming first to see if that's all it needed.

I tested this on one of my Z3100's old MK-R heads, using the purge kit from InkOwl (video https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Z0Xd3w0cK9c , which is actually where I learned about weighing them!). To conserve as much ink as possible and do 2 tasks at once, I used the LPS purge kit to remove any air from the printer ink tube as well as some ink, and then I put that ink into the InkOwl priming funnel. Clean the LPS syringe and repeat for the second colour in the head (even faster if you have 2 syringes!). Then use the InkOwl syringe tool to pull any air out of the head and prime it with ink. My MK-R sucked in a lot of red ink, so red had a lot of air, and brought in very little black ink, so black had little air. Brought the head from about 49g up to 59g, pretty good! Pic shows the setup (the big yellow clamp is just to keep it from tipping over, that open funnel makes me really nervous!! 😬 )

Unfortunately it was only good for practice, because the head I used was a faulty one (I didn't check the code!), so the printer rejected it. But it left 2 nice lines when blotted on paper towel so I know the nozzles were flowing good once I added the ink to them. I'll eventually try this will all my "airheads" to extend their lives.

Anyhow epic post but there's a lot of good info here that will hopefully help you monitor your printhead health proactively *before* things start failing, as well as extend the life of your heads..., which is critical for Z3100 owners now that HP has stopped producing HP 70 Red ink and printheads. (And the day will come too soon when it's the Z3200's time...)

Cheers!
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Kyle D Jackson
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kers

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Re: Best way to restore a Z3200 contaminated by non-hp ink?
« Reply #13 on: February 23, 2024, 06:12:37 am »

interesting! ; just had this problem with a printhead- 50 grams and no ink in one channel...
too bad the shipping costs are 20$ to europe for this useful purge kit from InkOwl ...
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Re: Best way to restore a Z3200 contaminated by non-hp ink?
« Reply #14 on: February 23, 2024, 10:16:36 am »

interesting! ; just had this problem with a printhead- 50 grams and no ink in one channel...
too bad the shipping costs are 20$ to europe for this useful purge kit from InkOwl ...

Hi Pieter, I've seen several other companies online and in YouTube videos that sell these printhead priming kits, so you can probably find one with better shipping options for you. It seems like any company that sells aftermarket ink also sells these (maybe they all use the same manufacturer). I chose InkOwl specifically because they have very cheap shipping from within Canada (which is hard to find!), and it didn't include a lot of plastic bottles, etc that I didn't need.

Also I found that searching specifically for HP 70 or 73 had limited results, but then I learned there are many other DesignJet printheads that are similar or identical to ours, so searching for HP DesignJet in general might have better results. That's actually how I found that video from InkOwl, it was titled as being for HP 88 and 940 heads. According to the InkOwl website (https://www.inkowl.com/inkjet/ink-refill-tools/hp/printhead-repair-tool-for-hp-70-72-73-88-91-761-762-771-773-774-940/P5035/) that kit is compatible with the following HP DesignJet printheads: "HP 70, 72, 73, 88, 91, 761, 762, 771, 773, 774, 940".

You may also have similar shipping issues for the LPS purge kit, since their shipping via UPS is much more expensive (at least it is here in Canada). I see a lot of syringes from these same aftermarket ink suppliers for refilling ink cartridges that look kinda similar, but I think the tips are different than the ones LPS sells for purging air from the ink tubes. Attached is a pic of the LPS tip; note the side hole as well as the clear seal that seals against ink supply tube fitting in the printhead carriage (ignore the lint, haha!).

Either way, I think the shipping costs of these tools is still wayyy cheaper than new heads and ink (or a new printer in the case of the Z3100, because the MK-R head is discontinued by HP).

Cheers!
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Kyle D Jackson
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Re: Best way to restore a Z3200 contaminated by non-hp ink?
« Reply #15 on: February 23, 2024, 05:40:13 pm »

Not sure I would be too quick to shade all the third party inks. Have had the z3200 going on 4 years and maybe use it for a print or two every other month. (Backup to our Epson fleet)
We started using the LD inks and they just last and last with no issues. I have maybe done a half dozen nozzle checks and two cleans in four years total. Wish my Epson's ran like that.

Hi, so I'm going to warn here that LD Products seems to be a pretty terrible retailer (today in 2024). I first heard of them through here and I ordered an HP printhead from them (legitimate sealed original) that shows on their website as in stock for immediate shipping. Nothing from them since, no shipping notice, no status update, no email responses, no phone answers (just voicemail). Since then I've found gobs of negative reviews online reporting similar, for example https://www.sitejabber.com/reviews/ldproducts.com

I've filed a PayPal dispute to get money returned.
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Kyle D Jackson
Ottawa, Canada
Lone Leaf Photography

dgberg

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Re: Best way to restore a Z3200 contaminated by non-hp ink?
« Reply #16 on: Today at 07:46:49 am »

Sounds more up to date then my experience which was 3-4 years ago.

Kyle D Jackson

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Re: Best way to restore a Z3200 contaminated by non-hp ink?
« Reply #17 on: Today at 10:04:55 am »

Sounds more up to date then my experience which was 3-4 years ago.

Yes I saw that sentiment in several of the comments, that people had used them for years and they were much better than now. Maybe it's financial distress, who knows.

Coincidentally they finally replied last night (after I submitted the PayPal dispute), told me the item isn't in stock and it's on back-order. I told them I'm cancelling anyway -- I only ordered from them because the website said it was in stock ready to ship. (It's a discontinued item so back-orders will never be filled.)

I've learned in recent years that a lot of shifty retailers will use fake "in stock" claims on their site to grab orders. This was one of the first times I didn't confirm it directly before ordering. (Although even then, I've recently had a scammy seller lie to me and take the order anyway..., I'm re-learning to check reviews first!)
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Kyle D Jackson
Ottawa, Canada
Lone Leaf Photography
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