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Author Topic: On Street Photography  (Read 21367 times)

Eric Myrvaagnes

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Re: On Street Photography
« Reply #40 on: December 08, 2015, 08:08:55 pm »

I have to say Rob, you are producing some very intriguing bw images. The last few have a strong sense of mystery.

JR
I agree.

As for the latest one, I had no idea you were photographing in bars as long ago as 1919.   :D

Eric
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Rob C

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Re: On Street Photography
« Reply #41 on: December 09, 2015, 03:51:58 am »

I have to say Rob, you are producing some very intriguing bw images. The last few have a strong sense of mystery.

JR


Hi, JR, I enjoy doing this sort of picture - not as much as I did model stuff, but, in its own way, it's also quite a giggle.

Thanks for the comment!

Rob C

Rob C

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Re: On Street Photography
« Reply #42 on: December 09, 2015, 04:02:10 am »

I agree.

As for the latest one, I had no idea you were photographing in bars as long ago as 1919.   :D

Eric


I was never one to waste an opportunity for a free drink!

Perhaps that's why, now, I can't have any more of them beyond that miserable glass of daily red! Weekends - well, Sundays - I cheat: with my home-made paella I indulge in a glass of Viña Sol. Delightful! I used to have Saturday lunch at home too, with the white, but am well on the road to abandoning that: the dishes, the pots; what a bore and how long it takes to clear the decks. So long, in fact, that I leave it until the very last thing before retiring, and often think I'm not going to have the courage to keep on, that I will end up facing them at breakfast. So far I have held on to my nerve and gone to bed with a clear kitchen if not always a clear conscience. Can't have everything.

Rob

drmike

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Re: On Street Photography
« Reply #43 on: December 09, 2015, 04:09:46 am »

Get a small dishwasher. Life is too short to wash pots and pans :) You can a nice slim one that works well for a limited number of plates etc.
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Rob C

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Re: On Street Photography
« Reply #44 on: December 09, 2015, 06:15:34 am »

Get a small dishwasher. Life is too short to wash pots and pans :) You can a nice slim one that works well for a limited number of plates etc.

Not on your life! Here, water costs a fortune, the obligatory Calgon costs another one, and the exercise from washing said dishes helps me sleep! It's a matter of boring oneself to sleep; safer than popping yet more little helpers.

Thought this might indicate the kinds of places where I do not have lunch:

A wealthy Jewish husband and his wife were having dinner at an upscale
restaurant when this absolutely stunning young woman comes over to their
table, gives the husband a big open mouthed kiss, then says she'll see him
later and walks away.

The wife glares at her husband and says, "Who the hell was that?"

"Oh," replies the husband, "she's my mistress."

"Well, that's the last straw," says the wife. "I've had enough, I want a divorce!"

"I can understand that," replies her husband, "but remember, if we get a
divorce it will mean no more shopping trips to Paris, no more wintering in
Barbados, no more summers in Tuscany, no more BMW in the garage and
no more yacht club.  But the decision is yours."

Just then, a mutual friend enters the restaurant with a gorgeous babe on his arm.

"Who's that woman with George?" asks the wife. "That's his mistress," says
her husband.

“Ours is prettier," she replies.
« Last Edit: December 09, 2015, 06:37:16 am by Rob C »
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GrahamBy

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Re: On Street Photography
« Reply #45 on: December 09, 2015, 06:26:04 am »

“Ours is prettier," she replies.

 ;D

Shame you weren't there to capture the moment of that first kiss  :)
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Rob C

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Re: On Street Photography
« Reply #46 on: December 09, 2015, 06:35:55 am »

;D

Shame you weren't there to capture the moment of that first kiss  :)

I would have blown it; left with my own mouth open.

Rob

graeme

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Re: On Street Photography
« Reply #47 on: December 09, 2015, 07:22:12 am »

This is about as 'street' as I ever get.
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Rob C

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Re: On Street Photography
« Reply #48 on: December 09, 2015, 09:24:28 am »

That's a very strange installation; if it was white, great capture of tones!

Truth to tell, it seems to have more surprise as a smaller image - before you can get the full idea of what you're looking at - seems like a floating veil or something light and breezy, just above the couple. Maybe you could try disconnecting it's earthly base, and making it look disembodied...

Rob
« Last Edit: December 09, 2015, 09:28:46 am by Rob C »
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Rob C

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Re: On Street Photography
« Reply #49 on: December 09, 2015, 09:43:00 am »

Huddle.

Rob

« Last Edit: December 09, 2015, 04:08:44 pm by Rob C »
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petermfiore

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Re: On Street Photography
« Reply #50 on: December 09, 2015, 04:49:20 pm »

This is a very "dark" image...crypt like.

Peter

Rob C

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Re: On Street Photography
« Reply #51 on: December 10, 2015, 03:39:20 am »

This is a very "dark" image...crypt like.

Peter


I find myself there a lot these days - these creatures just leap out at me all the hot dam time. Perhaps it's a reflection (NPI) of the winter: all those empty and closed shops that prove they have no valid reson to exist other than to relieve the honest tourist of his/her money - in return for which they don't even get old rope. Somehow, the lack of natural sustainability for those sorts of ventures appears a sign of their dishonesty. The crap trade. They probably run a publicly-funded course at university for it. But you have to wait six weeks to see a specialist at the local hospital.

Rob C

Rob C

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Re: On Street Photography
« Reply #52 on: December 10, 2015, 04:28:47 am »

Slow suicide.

Rob C

petermfiore

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Re: On Street Photography
« Reply #53 on: December 10, 2015, 08:18:35 am »

Slow suicide.

Rob C

Now the words are dark...

Peter

Rob C

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Re: On Street Photography
« Reply #54 on: December 10, 2015, 10:35:10 am »

Now the words are dark...

Peter

And the nights grow ever longer, the darkness creeping down earlier until the coming Solstice changes everything.

I went out to change a bulb at the beginning of the garden path today; the bloody thing just broke away in my hand, leaving its metal base in the Edison socket. Where it can damned well remain: I don't have insulated pliers and even less faith in the time switch. December; season of cheer.

Rob C

AlfSollund

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Re: On Street Photography
« Reply #55 on: December 11, 2015, 03:36:21 am »

I prefer a (fixed) lens around 35mm and noramlly crop photos afterwards. I have no moral point of view for my choice, just a photography standing.

First; the focal lens does not change perspective, only the placement of camera. A short focal lens requires me to move closer to the main subject. For *me* the subjcet in street is allways something alive. By moving closer I change the perspective to highlight the main subject and "push" the background to the eeeeh, background. So a short focal lenght for me is a means to highlight main subject. I can do this by a longer focal lenght and short DoF, but this minimises the ablity to show the context of the main subject.

Another reason for me to have a short focal lenght is to get a relationship with subject by moving closer. Other prefer to not have such a relationship.

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stamper

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Re: On Street Photography
« Reply #56 on: December 11, 2015, 03:53:01 am »

I prefer a (fixed) lens around 35mm and noramlly crop photos afterwards. I have no moral point of view for my choice, just a photography standing.

First; the focal lens does not change perspective, only the placement of camera. A short focal lens requires me to move closer to the main subject. For *me* the subjcet in street is allways something alive. By moving closer I change the perspective to highlight the main subject and "push" the background to the eeeeh, background. So a short focal lenght for me is a means to highlight main subject. I can do this by a longer focal lenght and short DoF, but this minimises the ablity to show the context of the main subject.

Another reason for me to have a short focal lenght is to get a relationship with subject by moving closer. Other prefer to not have such a relationship.



Which means you have become part of the scene and disturbed what you had visualized in the first place. If you had remained a spectator then the people in the scene would have been less aware of you and what you had seen in the first place would likely have remained intact. In a perfect world the photographer should be invisible and everything would remain "natural".

AlfSollund

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Re: On Street Photography
« Reply #57 on: December 11, 2015, 05:21:46 am »

Which means you have become part of the scene and disturbed what you had visualized in the first place. If you had remained a spectator then the people in the scene would have been less aware of you and what you had seen in the first place would likely have remained intact. In a perfect world the photographer should be invisible and everything would remain "natural".

Yes, exactly  :).

Sorry, I do not agree with you on "In a perfect world the photographer should be invisible and everything would remain "natural"". There is no such thing as an objective observer as soon as you make a photography. But I can agree to being a stronger director of the story to be told by establsihing a relationship. That is exactly my intention.

P.S. Modern science has for long left the idea that its possible to have someting "natural" or "intact". By observing the observer (being alive or not) interacts with reality and changes it.
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stamper

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Re: On Street Photography
« Reply #58 on: December 11, 2015, 05:39:17 am »

I have had a look at your images. Very interesting. Imo the best ones are the images where the people aren't looking at you or in your direction. The ones where they are looking at you look posed and this is where I differ from your approach. I try to get images where I haven't been noticed and I feel this is what "street" is all about. BTW where are your B&W images. If you only do colour then you aren't really a street photographer. ;)
« Last Edit: December 11, 2015, 05:42:58 am by stamper »
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stamper

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Re: On Street Photography
« Reply #59 on: December 11, 2015, 05:51:13 am »

This is what it is all about. The photographer isn't trying to create a scene or be part of it. He is an observer of the scene.

https://www.lensculture.com/articles/eamonn-doyle-i-dublin-street-portraits?utm_source=fb-social&utm_medium=social&utm_content=ART-314&utm_campaign=EA15-ART#slide-22
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