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Author Topic: Blurring the lines  (Read 14663 times)

Isaac

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Re: Blurring the lines
« Reply #40 on: October 11, 2014, 11:03:23 pm »

It's similar to a painter who paints in the photographic effect of bokeh - it may sell more paintings, but it is a photographic effect that, as a photographer, I find rather amusing when I see it in paintings.

Did you stop to wonder why a painter would do such a thing?

Quote
"Film has been the most influential visual art form for a few generations (perhaps now beginning to be superseded by games), and has given Western populations a very specific visual vocabulary. It would be foolish to ignore itů"

A Brush with the Real: Figurative Painting Today, page 36
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LesPalenik

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    • advantica blog
Re: Blurring the lines
« Reply #41 on: October 14, 2014, 02:12:56 am »

Essentially, it comes to terminology.
If a distorting optical filter or a slow shutter speed is used to drastically change what the photographer saw, it is quite legal and acceptable for competition judges and photo reviewers to call the resulting image a "real photograph".  Some call it even art. However, if you apply any software filters, the outcome becomes merely a "picture".
 
The important thing is that Joe The Plumber can install both kinds on a wall.

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luxborealis

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    • luxBorealis.com - photography by Terry McDonald
Re: Blurring the lines
« Reply #42 on: October 14, 2014, 08:30:41 pm »

Essentially, it comes to creativity.

"A painting too real"

Whether the digitally manipulated images surprise and delight.

Yes, that's it - creativity - and Eric Johansson has it in spades.
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Terry McDonald - luxBorealis.com
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