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Author Topic: Blurring the lines  (Read 14994 times)

LesPalenik

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Re: Blurring the lines
« Reply #20 on: September 30, 2014, 11:25:58 pm »

Yes, Isaac. For practical reasons and to discuss what sells and what not, the Pro Business section would be more appropriate.
I'm sure that many successful sellers experiment with all kinds of finishing methods to enhance the appeal of their pictures.

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LesPalenik

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Re: Blurring the lines
« Reply #21 on: October 01, 2014, 12:47:01 pm »

Quite a few years ago, I was participating at a popular art and craft show in the cottage country. I sold some books and small framed pictures, but I still remember the busiest booth there selling colorful wooden birdhouses. They couldn't keep up with the demand.
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RSL

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Re: Blurring the lines
« Reply #22 on: October 01, 2014, 02:00:37 pm »

Kitsch always wins in the end.
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LesPalenik

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Re: Blurring the lines
« Reply #23 on: October 03, 2014, 09:17:49 am »

Here is a scene from the North Shore of Lake Superior, rendered by the Topaz Impression program.
Not quite the Group Seven style, but the program managed to keep the rough look of the rugged cliffs and wind-swept pines, without obliterating the waves.



« Last Edit: October 03, 2014, 09:04:20 pm by LesPalenik »
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RSL

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Re: Blurring the lines
« Reply #24 on: October 03, 2014, 12:04:29 pm »

See?
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LesPalenik

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Re: Blurring the lines
« Reply #25 on: October 03, 2014, 02:12:37 pm »

It's not a sea, just a big lake.
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luxborealis

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Re: Blurring the lines
« Reply #26 on: October 03, 2014, 11:04:28 pm »

Not sure what your point is with this, Les. If it sells, great. But what are we here for? To create art? To create sales? I don't see blurred lines; just confusion, on my part anyway.
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LesPalenik

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Re: Blurring the lines
« Reply #27 on: October 03, 2014, 11:29:17 pm »

Terry,

Primarily, I wanted to share the results of my experimentation with different image renditions using the latest painting plugins. For comparison, below is a more classical B&W interpretation (including blurry water) - made with different software.
If there is any point to be made, IMHO, it would be that often the in-camera image altering modes or officially sanctioned BW/IR conversions inflict greater damage to the original image than the kitschy plugins. And there is the blurring of the various options since we have now so many ways to complete a capture.
As you said in your earlier post, we don't have to define it as art or photography just to keep everybody happy.
« Last Edit: October 04, 2014, 05:13:12 am by LesPalenik »
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luxborealis

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Re: Blurring the lines
« Reply #28 on: October 04, 2014, 10:36:17 am »

I guess I have a problem with "pretending". The works you are creating are photographs pretending to be paintings. They neither celebrate the unique qualities of the medium of photography, nor do they exhibit the unique qualities of a painting. Anyone with one iota of knowledge about painting will see them for what they are - fakes. It's like you are trying to dupe the ignorant into thinking they are something more than what you are making them look to be.

Granted, you can do whatever you want for whatever reasons; my opinion is irrelevant. However, it is sometimes helpful to discover how one might be perceived. Forewarned is forearmed.
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RSL

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Re: Blurring the lines
« Reply #29 on: October 04, 2014, 11:16:23 am »

+100
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Isaac

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Re: Blurring the lines
« Reply #30 on: October 04, 2014, 02:24:47 pm »

The works you are creating are photographs pretending to be paintings. … It's like you are trying to dupe the ignorant into thinking they are something more than what you are making them look to be.

If those you look-down-on as ignorant like them, what's the problem?

Is it that they like them more than your "real" photographs :-)
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RSL

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Re: Blurring the lines
« Reply #31 on: October 04, 2014, 03:41:05 pm »

Show us a photograph, Isaac -- real or fake, doesn't matter, just prove to us that you even know what a photograph is.
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LesPalenik

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Re: Blurring the lines
« Reply #32 on: October 04, 2014, 05:31:19 pm »

I guess I have a problem with "pretending". The works you are creating are photographs pretending to be paintings. They neither celebrate the unique qualities of the medium of photography, nor do they exhibit the unique qualities of a painting. Anyone with one iota of knowledge about painting will see them for what they are - fakes. It's like you are trying to dupe the ignorant into thinking they are something more than what you are making them look to be.

Granted, you can do whatever you want for whatever reasons; my opinion is irrelevant. However, it is sometimes helpful to discover how one might be perceived. Forewarned is forearmed.

In principle, I agree with the photographs and paintings having their unique qualities, and there are true masterpieces in both categories that don't need any artificial enhancements.
However, there are also some exquisite paintings that rival the fine details of photographs (i.e. Robert Bateman's nature pictures), and I have seen also nicely rendered digital paintings that looked to me more appealing than some "real" paintings with out of proportion elements, poor compositions, and even color disharmony.

It's not black and white world, conforming always to the rules of thirds. In the end, it really depends on qualities a particular artwork, and of course, personal preferences.
 
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LesPalenik

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Re: Blurring the lines
« Reply #33 on: October 04, 2014, 09:01:20 pm »

Show us a photograph, Isaac -- real or fake, doesn't matter, just prove to us that you even know what a photograph is.

Existence or quality of Isaac's photographs is irrelevant for this discussion. Most art critics can't paint and they don't know the difference between F-stop and G-spot.
This conundrum will be decided by the buyers not the shooters.

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Isaac

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Re: Blurring the lines
« Reply #34 on: October 04, 2014, 10:36:59 pm »

Existence or quality of Isaac's photographs is irrelevant for this discussion.

Indeed, and it's quite possible that Russ understands but has nothing more sensible to say ;-)


… and I have seen also nicely rendered digital paintings that looked to me more appealing than some "real" paintings …

Well, digital painting can be so much more than a paint effect applied to a photograph.

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Alan Klein

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Re: Blurring the lines
« Reply #35 on: October 04, 2014, 11:18:07 pm »

When I got Elements 4 a long time ago, it was loaded with filters to create these painting effects.  Also line drawing effects, etc.  It's nothing new.  I tried them a couple of times and they were interesting.  But I tired of them very quickly.  It's kind of like painting by the numbers.  But how many can you do of them before it gets boring?  I don't really understand why they get boring since there are so many filter effects you can try.  But realistic photos seem to hold my attention.  Can anyone explain that?

LesPalenik

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Re: Blurring the lines
« Reply #36 on: October 05, 2014, 12:55:08 am »

realistic photos seem to hold my attention.  Can anyone explain that?

That's actually the secret - to make first enough realistic photos - so you'll have something to play with.
But I know how you feel, I got it out of my system by now, too.
 
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RSL

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Re: Blurring the lines
« Reply #37 on: October 05, 2014, 08:26:56 am »

Existence or quality of Isaac's photographs is irrelevant for this discussion. Most art critics can't paint and they don't know the difference between F-stop and G-spot.
This conundrum will be decided by the buyers not the shooters.

The problem is that Isaac has never come close to showing he's a competent critic, so some indication he's actually done something related to photography might boost his success. And what the hell do "buyers" have to do with good art?
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LesPalenik

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Re: Blurring the lines
« Reply #38 on: October 05, 2014, 08:55:27 am »

Well, the buyers may not know much about the art, but they think they do and thus they support at least some artists.
 
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luxborealis

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Re: Blurring the lines
« Reply #39 on: October 08, 2014, 07:00:13 pm »

If those you look-down-on as ignorant like them, what's the problem?

Is it that they like them more than your "real" photographs :-)

Ignorant, in my use of the term, simply means uninformed (it's true definition) rather than the more modern, but incorrect pejorative use of the term.

And, I expect "real” photographs are better than no photographs, Isaac.
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