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Author Topic: Substitute for NEC PA-series monitors - discontinued  (Read 8446 times)

jejes

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Re: Substitute for NEC PA-series monitors - discontinued
« Reply #60 on: April 22, 2022, 11:58:57 am »

My monitors are Benq 27 and 24. Sw270c and sw240

Could you provide me the file or a link to the procedure?

Thank you

The "hack" involves replacing a system file, used in connection with X-Rite's i1Display Pro colorimeter, known as an EDR (Emissive Display Reference). The purpose of the file is to correct for the spectral characteristics of the display combined with the colorimeter being used in order to improve the calibration accuracy. A concise explanation of colorimeters and the use of a calibration matrix to improve accuracy can be found here.

X-Rite's SDK (Software Development Kit); for developers utilizing the i1Display Pro connected to their software, like BenQ, NEC, Eizo, etc., includes EDR files for various generic display types. A calibration matrix is calculated to improve the accuracy of the measurements. Accuracy is not an absolute like a switch that is either on or off, but a matter of degrees and this is a method commonly used to improve display calibration accuracy.

The "hack" or EDR "forging" procedure is to get a file and substitute it for a generic X-Rite file by renaming it using X-Rite's nomenclature and placing it in the system folder where EDR files are stored. The goal is to improve on the X-Rite generic files with a better (more accurate) generic file measured from a display technology that is closer to the spectral characteristics of your display. Replacing EDR files is a much discussed topic at the DisplayCal software forum by users interested in the pursuit of ever tighter tolerances wanting to get under the hood and make modifications.

If this is something that you wish to pursue, it would be necessary to know which display model you have to determine the general LCD panel type. Once that's known, you may be able to make some improvement in your current calibrations using the method described above. First, you may want to calibrate your new monitor and look at the results to determine if it's within your tolerance requirements for accuracy.
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digitaldog

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Re: Substitute for NEC PA-series monitors - discontinued
« Reply #61 on: April 22, 2022, 12:37:28 pm »

There's another process (hack if you will) that can be used IF (big if) you own a Spectrophotometer as well as such a Colorimeter, whereby you use the Spectrophotometer first:

How to use an i1Pro to create an offset for an i1Display (or similar), using SpectraView as an example, but it may be doable with other software products:
Background:
The two devices can be used in combination to create a correction offset which will lead to much better results. This involves first calibrating the display with the i1Pro measuring the resulting white point with the i1Display and creating a new target based on that measured white point.

Steps:

1. Connect the i1Pro
2. Select the desired Target in SpectraView and calibrate the display.
3. Confirm that the calibrated white point is acceptable (judge 100% white only).
4. Disconnect the i1Pro and connect the i1Display.
5. Open the SpectraView Preferences dialog.
6. Re-detect the color sensor.
7. Change the "Primary Colors Chromaticity Source" to "Factory Measurement"
8. Click OK. (for other software products, you may need to jot down the CIE xy values rather than what is stated below in step 4)

Next, you will create a new Target with a custom white point that has been adjusted with the offset between the two devices:

1. In SpectraView, click the "Edit Target settings" icon.
2. Click the "Edit..." button in the "White Point" group.
3. Click the "Measure" button and measure the white patch on the screen using the i1Display.
4. The CIE xy values should be filled in automatically.
5. Click OK.
6. Click OK.
7. Enter a new name for the Target file.
8. Make sure the new Target is selected, and calibrate using the ii1Display.

The white point should match what you got with the i1Pro and the greyscale should be much better.
The i1Display Colorimeter is more ideal for calibration of the display** but the Spectrophotometer is going to give you a better offset. Once that's been measured, just stick to using the Colorimeter.
**http://www.lumita.com/site_media/work/whitepapers/files/xrite-wp-3a.pdf
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TechTalk

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Re: Substitute for NEC PA-series monitors - discontinued
« Reply #62 on: April 22, 2022, 07:08:48 pm »

My monitors are Benq 27 and 24. Sw270c and sw240

Could you provide me the file or a link to the procedure?

Thank you

Next you'll need to determine the LCD panel type in each monitor. If you've already calibrated your monitors and are not satisfied with the calibration or are just curious and wish to experiment with this process, I would suggest making use of the forum at DisplayCal.

There are a number of people there that are very interested in this process and willing to aid in the detective work required to find the best match. Frankly, I've never found a need for this with either the NEC or Eizo monitors I've used. But, others needs may be different than my own.

Here's a link to a recent forum topic on a user's test with a BenQ SW240 like yours...

https://hub.displaycal.net/forums/topic/benq-sw240-pme-and-displaycal-results-custom-edr
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TechTalk

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Re: Substitute for NEC PA-series monitors - discontinued
« Reply #63 on: April 22, 2022, 07:35:21 pm »

There's another process (hack if you will) that can be used IF (big if) you own a Spectrophotometer as well as such a Colorimeter, whereby you use the Spectrophotometer first:

How to use an i1Pro to create an offset for an i1Display (or similar), using SpectraView as an example, but it may be doable with other software products...

Sensor correlation is built into Eizo ColorNavigator 7 and basICColor Display 6 Pro as well. As you indicated, this will aid in fine tuning the display calibration accuracy.

It's also useful in a production environment to have correlation to a master reference instrument of all the other measuring devices used to improve color consistency.
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