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Author Topic: How do you post to Instagram?  (Read 1024 times)

Rob C

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Re: How do you post to Instagram?
« Reply #20 on: April 08, 2020, 06:07:22 am »

Rob, you are making a judgment about something you know nothing about (IG), according to your own admission. 90% of images posted there is seen on a phone screen. I can assure you that even so, the image technical quality is quite good. So good, in fact, that nobody pays attention to it any more, it is taken for granted. There are no issues with "compression" or sharpness. Content is the king. And by content I mean girls and cats. Landscapes a distant third.

I am making a judgement based on what you have just told me about Instagram. It's because I value your opinions that I have taken them for accurate.

Do you want to contradict yourself?

Rob C

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Re: How do you post to Instagram?
« Reply #21 on: April 08, 2020, 06:43:57 am »

Rob, Instagram is a window to the world and boosts the the rankings of any website linked to the account.

As for image quality, frankly if it takes a minor hit on small jpegs then that's par for the course and would be of no concern. As for colour problems, well, I know what I'm doing so it simply won't be an issue. You think my work or that of others is well represented on small jpegs posted to LuLa or elsewhere?

There are many photographers who I admire posting to IG. If for any reason I'm not happy I have the option of deleting any content, as here or elsewhere. I have more control over reproduction than I ever had when delivering transparencies to agencies, publishers and libraries.

Indeed I do; perhaps not in an absolute fashion in that I am sure that some people manage to print very well. Nonetheless, as few see prints anymore, and as I certanly see far more images online than in magazines or any other paper medium, it seems very clear to me that there are huge differences between the quality of work posted online, so judgement calls are still legitimate. You are surely not suggesting that everything online is equally good or poor, in both execution and/or content, both being vital factors, IMO?

Vision is an illusion. I do not for a moment agree that my work on print looks much better than my work on my monitor: they are different mediums. My transparencies always looked better than my finest colour prints. As you very well know, though some here may not, that is the difference between viewing something by transmitted light rather than via reflected light. It's key, all else being equal. That said, the work on my monitor may certainly look better than the same work online on somebody else's monitor or cellphone.

Actually, I have a website because it gives me an instantly available directory to the best of the material from the past that survived changing countries, destruction of material that could not be sold back to clients (foreven much regretted!), material recouped from a stock agency - the fact that so much of which had been scuffed but not reported as having been licensed out raised a lot of questions as to how, then, such damage happened... I also get a place to gather my thoughts on the times that new pictures do get produced.

I think my stuff on my monitor looks as good as I can get it to look. The thing is, on that same monitor - as on the little iPad - images on the websites of people whose work I admire do look excellent. So really, I guess it depends what one sees from which source, and on which viewing device it is being seen.

KLaban

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Re: How do you post to Instagram?
« Reply #22 on: April 08, 2020, 08:03:27 am »

Indeed I do; perhaps not in an absolute fashion in that I am sure that some people manage to print very well. Nonetheless, as few see prints anymore, and as I certanly see far more images online than in magazines or any other paper medium, it seems very clear to me that there are huge differences between the quality of work posted online, so judgement calls are still legitimate. You are surely not suggesting that everything online is equally good or poor, in both execution and/or content, both being vital factors, IMO?

Vision is an illusion. I do not for a moment agree that my work on print looks much better than my work on my monitor: they are different mediums. My transparencies always looked better than my finest colour prints. As you very well know, though some here may not, that is the difference between viewing something by transmitted light rather than via reflected light. It's key, all else being equal. That said, the work on my monitor may certainly look better than the same work online on somebody else's monitor or cellphone.

Actually, I have a website because it gives me an instantly available directory to the best of the material from the past that survived changing countries, destruction of material that could not be sold back to clients (foreven much regretted!), material recouped from a stock agency - the fact that so much of which had been scuffed but not reported as having been licensed out raised a lot of questions as to how, then, such damage happened... I also get a place to gather my thoughts on the times that new pictures do get produced.

I think my stuff on my monitor looks as good as I can get it to look. The thing is, on that same monitor - as on the little iPad - images on the websites of people whose work I admire do look excellent. So really, I guess it depends what one sees from which source, and on which viewing device it is being seen.

Surely not.

What I am suggesting is the levels of knowledge and skill of those posting images to the web are highly variable as are the devices used to view those images. I view all web images with distrust. I do my very best to ensure that those folk who view my online images on calibrated monitors see as true a representation of my intention as possible but there my responsibility ends as does my concern.

I've also never claimed anywhere at anytime that content quality is the be-all and end-all in regards to image making, skill of execution is as important online as it is in print, it's just that without that calibrated monitor and reliable viewing device that skill is pretty much wasted. That said, images do rely on their quality of content, without that quality content there can be nothing worthwhile.

I too loved my transparencies, but again my responsibility for their reproduction ended on handover.   
« Last Edit: April 08, 2020, 08:10:14 am by KLaban »
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fdisilvestro

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Re: How do you post to Instagram?
« Reply #23 on: April 09, 2020, 06:05:23 am »

if You have panoramic ratio images (horizontal), you may be able to post higher resolution photos by dividing them into equal parts. IG allows to include several images per post (10 if I’m not mistaken) and they are shown without separation between them.

Using PS is is very easy to cut a large image in parts.

One drawback: you will not be able to see the whole image at once, as you have to swipe laterally to see it all. Some people don’t like it, others post the large pieces plus a small image showing the whole content.

In regards to business, Richard Prince has sold for $100,000 IG images he “appropriated” and intervened from other users

Ken Bennett

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Re: How do you post to Instagram?
« Reply #24 on: April 12, 2020, 09:31:15 am »

I have a folder in Dropbox for Instagram photos. I have an Export preset in Lightroom to save a 1200 pixel sRGB jpeg to that folder. In a few seconds it is available on my phone, where I can save it to my camera roll and then post it to Instagram. One advantage is that the photo still lives in the Dropbox folder so I have all the images I have posted.

I have done the pano trick in Instagram and it works really well -- as long as people know to scroll left and right :)

instagram.com/wakeforestphoto
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Equipment: a camera and some lenses. https://www.instagram.com/wakeforestphoto/

KLaban

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Re: How do you post to Instagram?
« Reply #25 on: April 12, 2020, 09:45:59 am »

The images I post to LuLa and several other sites are hosted on my website rather than downloaded to the third party sites. This offers me total simplistic control. This is my working methodology, in fact I only very rarely make an exception to this rule and in exceptional circumstances.

I take it there's no way of doing this with Instagram, if not then that could be the deal breaker.
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