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Author Topic: Panoramic Photography: The Psychological Power- by David Osborne  (Read 2267 times)

fdisilvestro

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Re: Panoramic Photography: The Psychological Power- by David Osborne
« Reply #20 on: February 02, 2020, 05:51:36 pm »

It looks like that would be part of the workshops

nirpat89

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Re: Panoramic Photography: The Psychological Power- by David Osborne
« Reply #21 on: February 03, 2020, 09:13:04 am »

I may be missing something here (which won't be the first time) but where are the panoramas in this article.  As per my understanding, a panorama is defined by the aspect ratio - with the width significantly more than the height than the typical 3:2 in a normal camera shot.  The images in the article all seem to be close to the 3:2 if not even smaller.  It would seem to me that they are simply photographs that have been created by stitching normal lens shots together to create a wide angle shot.  May be this has some benefit of perspective over a single wide angle shot of equivalent focal length.  But still that does not make them "panoramas."  It would have been nice if the author had made such a comparison to visually demonstrate the advantage of going through the whole process of stitching a bunch of shots as opposed to taking a single wide angle shot (apart from the being able to use normal lens instead of wide angle lens if unavailable and getting much higher final pixel count than obtained in a single shot.)

Am I the only one who thinks this way?  Or has the definition of a panorama changed when I was not looking?

:Niranjan.
« Last Edit: February 04, 2020, 10:24:20 pm by nirpat89 »
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kers

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Re: Panoramic Photography: The Psychological Power- by David Osborne
« Reply #22 on: February 15, 2020, 09:22:34 am »

I may be missing something here (which won't be the first time) but where are the panoramas in this article.  As per my understanding, a panorama is defined by the aspect ratio - with the width significantly more than the height than the typical 3:2 in a normal camera shot.  The images in the article all seem to be close to the 3:2 if not even smaller.  It would seem to me that they are simply photographs that have been created by stitching normal lens shots together to create a wide angle shot.  May be this has some benefit of perspective over a single wide angle shot of equivalent focal length.  But still that does not make them "panoramas."  It would have been nice if the author had made such a comparison to visually demonstrate the advantage of going through the whole process of stitching a bunch of shots as opposed to taking a single wide angle shot (apart from the being able to use normal lens instead of wide angle lens if unavailable and getting much higher final pixel count than obtained in a single shot.)

Am I the only one who thinks this way?  Or has the definition of a panorama changed when I was not looking?

:Niranjan.

Hello Niranjan, I would say a panorama is a composed photo made out of several shots stitcht together. Nothing more.

So there would be no need to have a certain aspect ratio.

But you are right; it seems - some of the shots presented here can also be made in one shot with a wide angle lens - but afterwards some perspectual distortion would be necessary.
I that case the only benefit is more resolution and a more perfect perspective distortion.
Others seem to be cylindrical panorama's - so a different projection and ultra wide angle view that cannot be obtained with a standard camera.
Anyway, that information is lacking in the article.
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LesPalenik

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Re: Panoramic Photography: The Psychological Power- by David Osborne
« Reply #23 on: February 15, 2020, 08:05:03 pm »

There are three (or more) different definitions when it comes to panoramic photography.

1. Panoramic format (1:2, ,1:3, and longer), usually made using special lenses or stitching. Vertical panoramas fall also in this group.

2. Panoramic Viewpoint - made with rotational cameras or stitching from multiple images made on a rotating platform. The rotations of the discreet or contiguous segments (in the film cameras) especially when shot with a wide lens provides a special viewpoint which can't be accomplished simply by a single exposure cameras. Or even less so by cropping a regular image to an elongated format.

3. Mosaic type of photography using multiple exposures and a long lens, while adjusting horizontal and vertical angles, but formatted to a conventional image shape. i.e 2:3 (40"x60"). This type of photograph can increase substantially the final resolution and sharpness, but it should never be called panoramic.
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