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Author Topic: Panoramic Photography: The Psychological Power- by David Osborne  (Read 2088 times)

kers

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A very basic essay with beautiful atmospheric panorama's.
It is too bad David Osborne does not go into detail of making one of the stitches that are presented.
As a PTGui user i can only agree that the software is very good and leaves the user a lot of freedom to make the desired type of stitch, and to correct things when a stitch turns bad.
After export to photoshop layers you are also able to do a lot of finetuning.
The idea that PTGui does not loose detail is correct, but only in the sense that it uses the detail provided as well as it can, but the chosen projection makes that detail is lost because of the stretching of the original image.
Usually that is not a problem at all; The quality is already enormous, since serveral images are used instead of one to make the photo.
If i see correct, some of the stiches in the essay are cylindrical panorama's and they loose less quality than the rectinlinear ones. Also they let you look at an image of more than say 100º horizontal that still looks 'normal'.
The penalty is that apart form the horizon all horizontal lines are bend, while vertical lines stay straight. For some subjects that is not much a problem.
Good panorama's start with well taken photographs; all from one perfect viewpoint. In that case the stitches can be very precise, not to say perfect.
« Last Edit: January 26, 2020, 05:16:40 pm by kers »
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BernardLanguillier

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Re: Panoramic Photography: The Psychological Power- by David osborne
« Reply #1 on: January 20, 2020, 07:19:07 pm »

The photographs are very nice with great compositon, colors and a beautiful management of the tones.

As far as the stitching part goes, in all honesty I fail to see how this adds to the tens of articles published these part 15 years on the subject.

It's nice to see that PTgui continues to attract attention, but the stitchers here have been using it for a long long time. ;)

Anyway, it's all good if it can attract new talents to the art of stitching and therefore ensure that the software keeps getting updated.

Cheers,
Bernard

VidJa

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Re: Panoramic Photography: The Psychological Power- by David osborne
« Reply #2 on: January 21, 2020, 02:48:52 pm »

Being from the Netherlands, home of PTgui I can’t get rid of the feeling this is a big advertisement.
For the brave among us, “hugin” is a free alternative http://hugin.sourceforge.net/
Instead of expensive panorama heads I use a simple home made aluminium base plate with adjustable slit to position the turning point under the optical middle of the lens. Works great.

That said, david’s pictures are just great and inspiring
« Last Edit: January 21, 2020, 02:54:27 pm by VidJa »
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Guillermo Luijk

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Re: Panoramic Photography: The Psychological Power- by David osborne
« Reply #3 on: January 21, 2020, 06:25:29 pm »

It's time stitchers start to fix this mistake: calling the no-parallax point as nodal point when it actually is the entrance pupil, which can be a very different location on a lens.
E.g. (N1=nodal point, EP=entrance pupil):



The author also attributes to stitching the absence of distortion, and to UWA lenses ugly distorions, when distortion is going to exist whenever we map a large FOV on a single flat image. The kind and appearance of this distortion depends solely on the FOV and the projection chosen, not on the nature of capture (stitching vs UWA). A rectilinear projection (the only valid for proper rectilinear arquitecture photography) will end in stitching with exactly the same distortion as using a single shot on a rectilinear UWA. On the other hand a rectilinear UWA capture can be "re-projected" (using stitching software is an option by the way) in any other kind of projection getting the same result in terms of distortion as any given stitch.

No free lunch: every type of projection has strongholds and weaknesses; rectilinear is usually preferred when straight elements need to be respected as linear, cylindrical works fine for nature landscapes because it doesn't distort the left and right ends more than the centre, etc...

A good resource to learn about projections, no matter if we don't use that software: PTAssembler Projections.

Regards
« Last Edit: January 22, 2020, 06:22:37 am by Guillermo Luijk »
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kers

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Re: Panoramic Photography: The Psychological Power- by David osborne
« Reply #4 on: January 21, 2020, 06:44:06 pm »

Being from the Netherlands, home of PTgui I can’t get rid of the feeling this is a big advertisement.
For the brave among us, “hugin” is a free alternative http://hugin.sourceforge.net/
Instead of expensive panorama heads I use a simple home made aluminium base plate with adjustable slit to position the turning point under the optical middle of the lens. Works great.

That said, david’s pictures are just great and inspiring
With PTGui, Hugin and many other panorama-programs the base of the program are the Panotools of Helmut Dersch. ( PtGui - PanoTools Grafical User Interface)
https://wiki.panotools.org/Helmut_Dersch. They are all just different frontends.
I agree that you can make your own panorama equipment, and i did for a long time.
But it is very convenient to get something wellmade of metal that is build for it, especially when you want to do mulitirow stitching and you use more than one lens.
You can make very easy good landscape panorama's just with the camera in your hands. These panorama's are far less critical then indoor panorama's.
It all depends on the perfection you want to achieve and the convenience you desire to achieve it.
« Last Edit: January 21, 2020, 06:56:30 pm by kers »
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kers

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Re: Panoramic Photography: The Psychological Power- by David osborne
« Reply #5 on: January 21, 2020, 07:00:58 pm »

It's time stitchers start to fix this mistake: calling the no-parallax point as nodal point when it actually is the entrance pupil, which can be a very different location on a lens.
E.g. (N1=nodal point, EP=entrance pupil):



The author also attributes to stitching the absence of distortion, and to UWA lenses ugly distorions, when distortion is going to exist whenever we map a large FOV on a single flat image. The kind and appearance of this distortion depends solely on the FOV and the projection chosen, not on the nature of capture (stitching vs UWA). A rectilinear projection (the only valid for proper rectilinear arquitecture photography) will end in stitching with exactly the same distortion as using a single shot on a rectilinear UWA. On the other side a rectilinear UWA capture can be "re-projected" (using stitching software by the way) in any other kind of projection getting the same result in terms of distortion as any given stitch.

No free lunch: every type of projection has strongholds and weaknesses; rectilinear is usually preferred when straight elements need to be respected as linear, cylindrical works fine for nature landscapes, etc...

A good resource to learn about projections, no matter if we don't use that software: PTAssembler Projections.

Regards
Thank you Guillermo, also for the intersting link.
So i understand the entrance pupil is the actual viewpoint position of the lens, and can be even outside the lensbody.



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Guillermo Luijk

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Re: Panoramic Photography: The Psychological Power- by David osborne
« Reply #6 on: January 21, 2020, 07:14:07 pm »

So i understand the entrance pupil is the actual viewpoint position of the lens, and can be even outside the lensbody.
Yes it can. The entrance pupil can be seen as the exact point you'd need to locate your eye in order to have exactly the same point of view as your lens.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Entrance_pupil

"The geometric location of the entrance pupil is the vertex of the camera's angle of view[1] and consequently its center of perspective, perspective point, view point, projection centre[2] or no-parallax point.[3] This point is important in panoramic photography, because the camera must be rotated around it in order to avoid parallax errors in the final, stitched panorama.[4][5] Panoramic photographers often incorrectly refer to the entrance pupil as a nodal point, which is a different concept. Depending on the lens design, the entrance pupil location on the optical axis may be behind, within or in front of the lens system; and even at infinite distance from the lens in the case of telecentric systems."

Regards

Rob C

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Re: Panoramic Photography: The Psychological Power- by David osborne
« Reply #7 on: January 22, 2020, 09:34:54 am »

The title illustration is amazing; if the building is real, it also shows how to waste money in monumental fashion and scale.

Mean while, the Earth heats and zillions starve.

;-)

Alan Klein

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Re: Panoramic Photography: The Psychological Power- by David osborne
« Reply #8 on: January 22, 2020, 10:48:18 am »

Man can't live by bread alone.  Aesthetic beauty adds spirit and life to the mundane.  Otherwise, why are we taking beautiful photographs?

kers

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Re: Panoramic Photography: The Psychological Power- by David osborne
« Reply #9 on: January 22, 2020, 11:05:24 am »

The title illustration is amazing; if the building is real, it also shows how to waste money in monumental fashion and scale.

Mean while, the Earth heats and zillions starve.

;-)
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Palau_de_les_Arts_Reina_Sofia
Valencia wanted to attract more tourists looking at the succes of Bilbao with its new metro and Guggenheim Museum.
They invited Architect Calatrava to make some attractive and expensive buildings... it costed 1.3 miljard €
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Guillermo Luijk

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Re: Panoramic Photography: The Psychological Power- by David osborne
« Reply #10 on: January 22, 2020, 12:56:06 pm »

if the building is real
Come on, you never visited Valencia being so close? one of the nicest and less known cities in Spain. A big and beautiful old town, a joy to walk or ride (VLC is completely flat with a lot of bike lanes), pleasant promenades and parks along the course of what used to be the Turia river (now a huge park where among others this building is located).

Regards

Alan Klein

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Re: Panoramic Photography: The Psychological Power- by David osborne
« Reply #11 on: January 22, 2020, 01:01:44 pm »

Which is a nicer city to visit? Valencia or Barcelona?

Guillermo Luijk

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Re: Panoramic Photography: The Psychological Power- by David osborne
« Reply #12 on: January 22, 2020, 01:43:27 pm »

Which is a nicer city to visit? Valencia or Barcelona?
Barcelona is a must, Valencia is a nice second option one you already know the it's-a-must cities in Spain (Barcelona, Madrid, Sevilla, Granada, Toledo, Salamanca, Segovia,...).

Regards

Rob C

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Re: Panoramic Photography: The Psychological Power- by David osborne
« Reply #13 on: January 22, 2020, 04:36:24 pm »

Oddly enough, I don't give a stuffed sparrow for "must do"" concepts and cities and like that. Through my work I was able to channel the shoots to the places I really wanted to visit and some, unfortunately, that I did not. And my list was short, the only one I missed out on was the Seychelles, and that was my own fault.

My bro'n'law kept a place between Valencia and Alicante and we visited for a week. Never felt so glad to get back to the island. The only city I really would like to go back to is Rome, but it's probably not the place of my memory from when my mother lived there mid-fifties.

But then, I hate tourism and the "if this is Thursday it must be Wherever" emotional depth and sense of place.

:-)

Peter McLennan

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Re: Panoramic Photography: The Psychological Power- by David osborne
« Reply #14 on: January 22, 2020, 04:45:10 pm »

The title illustration is amazing

As are most of his images.  Would that I had the resources to take one of his workshops.
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Guillermo Luijk

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Re: Panoramic Photography: The Psychological Power- by David osborne
« Reply #15 on: January 22, 2020, 04:55:18 pm »

My bro'n'law kept a place between Valencia and Alicante
Once I flew over a place between NY and London and found it very boring, just endless ocean. Strangely NY and London were very different :P

kers

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Re: Panoramic Photography: The Psychological Power- by David osborne
« Reply #16 on: January 22, 2020, 07:17:15 pm »

Barcelona is a must, Valencia is a nice second option one you already know the it's-a-must cities in Spain (Barcelona, Madrid, Sevilla, Granada, Toledo, Salamanca, Segovia,...).

Regards

And Bilbao; i liked the completely different culture of activism roughness, beer as opposed to... Sevilla...
I liked the X in the Basque language
and the Guggenheim of course

Of your list i still have to go to Segovia and Valencia...
Anyway I very much like Spain; San Sebastian, Huesca, Cuenca ... even Teruel.
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Rob C

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Re: Panoramic Photography: The Psychological Power- by David osborne
« Reply #17 on: January 23, 2020, 03:43:29 am »

Once I flew over a place between NY and London and found it very boring, just endless ocean. Strangely NY and London were very different :P


Yeah, I was there a couple of times too. Even worse was the space between London and Singapore: it was mostly dark as night. But the Singapore Airlines hostesses were the most beautiful ones I have ever seen, which quite made up for it.

;-)

earlybird

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Re: Panoramic Photography: The Psychological Power- by David osborne
« Reply #18 on: January 26, 2020, 10:06:38 am »

Do any of Mr. Osborn's articles explain the nuts and bolts of his post processing multi layering techniques?

The introductions of each of the articles seem to imply that they dwell on the topics of forethought, imagination, and psychology.

I am very interested in the post processing technique and would like to learn more about the workflow after the base layer picture has been made.
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earlybird

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Re: Panoramic Photography: The Psychological Power- by David Osborne
« Reply #19 on: February 02, 2020, 08:46:19 am »

Do any of Mr. Osborn's articles explain the nuts and bolts of his post processing multi layering techniques?

Thank you.
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