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Author Topic: Nikon Z & Prores vs Blackmagic raw  (Read 5823 times)

smthopr

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    • Bruce Alan Greene Cinematography
Re: Nikon Z & Prores vs Blackmagic raw
« Reply #20 on: August 26, 2019, 08:29:44 pm »

I am on Windows using 8 bit output to NEC monitor which has 12-bit internal processing. After monitor calibration and with the use of the icc profiles there is absolutely no visible banding in color managed worklow, using Photoshop. The key here really is the 12-bit processing prior the 8-bit final output.

Michael, I think the issue here is the high bit processing you are using in Photoshop, rather than the 12 bit internal processing of the NEC display.  Or... it could be both :)

When color grading video in a video grading app, you don't have access to the volumetric color data contained in the .icc profile stored in your OS and used by Photoshop.  So, .icc/Spectraview calibration is not ideal for video grading.  This issue has been discussed at length in the liftgammagain.com forum.  The good news is, that if you are using Davinci Resolve, an iOne Display Pro probe, and a decklink video output card, then you can use open source Displaycal software to create a true 3D output LUT that you can use in Resolve.  If you are adventurous, you can check out the Displaycal website to see how this is done.  Or you can buy or rent Lightspace commercial software to do this as well, and it might be a slightly better calibration, but I'm not sure about that... But it's quite popular software for the professional grading business.
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John Brawley

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Re: Nikon Z & Prores vs Blackmagic raw
« Reply #21 on: March 02, 2020, 05:36:15 am »



I will not turn this thread into a "how to calibrate" for video thread, but I just wanted to point out that many many professional colorists do work with 8 bit video output to their displays, at least for SDR/HDTV/cinema work and it's fine.  Viewing in 8 bit does not change the grade, but maybe at the margins, helps one see any banding artifacts, or lack of them.

Errrr no.

Displays are 10 bit and the files are often 12 bit LOG / 16 bit lin.

No serious colourist is working on an 8 bit monitor.  Calibration isn't going to change bit depth.

By the way, most BMD cameras shoot 16 bit LIN internally.  They get encoded as a 12 bit log profile for recording to either ProRes 444 or to BRAW.

I suspect we'll see BMD video assists doing BRAW recording for cameras like the Nikons (and sigma FP and sony's) soon.

JB
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smthopr

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Re: Nikon Z & Prores vs Blackmagic raw
« Reply #22 on: March 02, 2020, 01:45:14 pm »

Errrr no.

Displays are 10 bit and the files are often 12 bit LOG / 16 bit lin.

No serious colourist is working on an 8 bit monitor.  Calibration isn't going to change bit depth.

By the way, most BMD cameras shoot 16 bit LIN internally.  They get encoded as a 12 bit log profile for recording to either ProRes 444 or to BRAW.

I suspect we'll see BMD video assists doing BRAW recording for cameras like the Nikons (and sigma FP and sony's) soon.

JB

From my experience, viewing a graded video image in 8 bit SDR is ok.  Ok, as long as the high bit originals are processed in 32 bit float from high bit depth originals.  Banding in 8 bit, after grading is very very slight and usually hard to see.  Because all the processing and rendering is done in high bit, it doesn't effect the delivery at all.  Though there is certainly no harm in viewing in 10 bit, as long as it doesn't effect real time playback on your system.

That said, John is a very accomplished cinematographer who does beautiful work... So, please don't consider this an "argument" :) :) :)

All I mean to say is that if you can't have 10 bit display at the moment, it doesn't mean you can't accurately color correct your work, as long as the display is properly calibrated with a 3d LUT.
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