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Author Topic: The Changing Landscape  (Read 44103 times)

Tony Ovens

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Re: The Changing Landscape
« Reply #280 on: February 04, 2019, 07:13:43 am »

The article is not unreadable. It is difficult to read and even more difficult to consider seriously. However, now I have made myself read it, I find that it actually contains some interesting ideas. Many I'm sure will simply ignore this sort of article or fret about the content and presentation faults here on the forum. But for others the thinking that Josh explores may well be really helpful. For the very first time (I have no previous experience of 'psychobabble' as some have described Josh's words) I am about to go on a local mindfulness trail through a nature reserve of woodland, open heath and some small lakes. The idea it seems is to concentrate on what's around and to calm down! With all the problems I see in the news everyday a moment or two of calm and reflection might prove no bad thing. I'll let you know.
Unlike many who write here I find the new approach to Lula worth the effort it takes to read it. The grammar issues and so on are obviously important to some but honestly, it's all very minor irritation.
The main page articles are only a fraction of what's on offer and the forum carries on the good work as usual regardless - thank goodness.
Tony
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Alan Goldhammer

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Re: The Changing Landscape
« Reply #281 on: February 04, 2019, 07:33:15 am »

The article was retro-1970s 'New Age.'  I thought most have moved past that but I guess there are still hold outs.
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bjanes

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Re: The Changing Landscape
« Reply #282 on: February 04, 2019, 08:47:53 am »

'Believing is Seeing' proved very difficult to read, opaque, rather full of 'pyschobabble' and in need of copy-editing.

+1

Writing while stoned?  ;)

Bill
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faberryman

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Re: The Changing Landscape
« Reply #283 on: February 04, 2019, 09:06:34 am »

I knew it would come to this.

amolitor

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Re: The Changing Landscape
« Reply #284 on: February 04, 2019, 09:29:03 am »

Oh, come on. It's only $12 a year.
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faberryman

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Re: The Changing Landscape
« Reply #285 on: February 04, 2019, 09:51:55 am »

Oh, come on. It's only $12 a year.
Why pay anything for this type of drivel?

amolitor

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Re: The Changing Landscape
« Reply #286 on: February 04, 2019, 10:25:15 am »

I forget the details but I think the archives play some role in the argument.
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elliot_n

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Re: The Changing Landscape
« Reply #287 on: February 04, 2019, 11:17:03 am »

Thank you Josh for an interesting article.

It's difficult to integrate photography with a Buddhist practice. Photography's desire to frame space and freeze time seems at odds with a perception of the world as both infinite and impermanent. (I was taught meditation by a Buddhist-convert who had recently retired from a career as a war-photographer ó he felt blessed that he no longer had to divide the world up into little rectangles.)

Whilst it's true that the practice of photography can have elements of mindfulness about it (a mindfulness of seeing rather than the more common mindfulness of breathing), often this heightened state of attention is dedicated to making simulacra of pre-existing photographs (icebergs, sand dunes, Tuscan vistas etc).

And so the question needs to be asked ó What, if anything, should a Buddhist photograph? The disparate photographs used to illustrate the article seem to address this question in a thoughtful way.







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josh.reichmann

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Re: The Changing Landscape
« Reply #288 on: February 04, 2019, 11:41:13 am »

^ Now that! ...Is interesting.
The subject matter of a shot and how it relates to oneís own conscious exploration, for anyone, should or CAN be considered mindfully.

Infact, that was the jump off for part 2.
Thanks for taking this back into a productive light.

Josh
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JeffS

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Re: The Changing Landscape
« Reply #289 on: February 04, 2019, 12:36:27 pm »

^ So the other commentary is not interesting and not productive?  Opposing points of view can also be considered mindfully. 

Jeff
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josh.reichmann

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Re: The Changing Landscape
« Reply #290 on: February 04, 2019, 12:50:32 pm »

Some were !

 :)
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Ray Harrison

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Re: The Changing Landscape
« Reply #291 on: February 04, 2019, 12:53:28 pm »

Josh, maybe consider most commentary as mindful at the very least (to overuse a word that you said was overused already :))). People care enough to comment and that's a good thing  :).
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josh.reichmann

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Re: The Changing Landscape
« Reply #292 on: February 04, 2019, 12:57:28 pm »

Equanimity! Indeed
 ;)
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bcooter

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Re: The Changing Landscape
« Reply #293 on: February 04, 2019, 01:03:04 pm »

snip....

Thanks for taking this back into a productive light.

Josh

Josh, good answer.

I donít mind your writing, or trying to give a behind the scene interpretation of why, what, goes through an artistís brain to produce imagery.  Itís also refreshing to see someone feature image makers that shoot still ďfilmĒ cameras and Iím guessing, but I feel that your still finding your way and trying to differentiate LL from the other image based sites, while playing to your current members while gaining new audience.

Though I donít consider myself a gear head (maybe sort of) but I would like to see a few more articles of some equipment manufacturers, without becoming a any ďone" brand show.   Especially some of the motion/cinema equipment, like the new wave of LED lighting.

Last Saturday, I went t the bsc expo  https://www.bscexpo.com which featured cinema/broadcast equipment from the new small Nikon, to $100,000 cinema cameras.  I mostly went to hear Roger Deakins speak, but was fascinated by the advances in Lenses, lighting, stabilizers, a lot that has use in still production.

I havenít been to a equipment expo in years as Iíve felt still equipment has sort of leveled off.  The BSC expo was different, with a different and diverse crowd, from small one man band filmmakers (that also shoot stills) to DOPís grips, gaffers, all sorts of crew and they all had that look of crew.   I actually made 4 tours of the show, so I wouldnít miss anything.  What was refreshing was every booth I stopped at, I got real information without a rep dissing a competitor, or trying to oversell me and every rep I spoke to had a direct to the point answers. 

There was huge demonstrations, to single person booths that were tiny companies.  One got my attention is called photon beard.  The owner had a zz top type of beard (no pun intended) and photo beard is the oldest lighting manufacturer in the UK, starting in 1882.   They had a limited line but sold LEDs, Tungsten Kits and a blonde HMI that sold for around 3 grand including ballast, producing 1200 watts and only pulling 7 amps from the mains. 

Sigma has a great line of small cine lenses that are lightweight and beautiful in look and sharpness with smooth roll off.   

The most beautiful camera was the new Panavision that is a rent only camera and this photo I linked to does not do the camera justice.  Itís not as large as the photo looks, but itís 8k, Full Frame (still camera size) sensor and it was very impressive.  https://dxl.panavision.com 

There also was a small company that works with PS technique and builds stabilizers for small mirrorless to large cinema cameras and it was amazingly easy to use with virtually zero learning curve. It wasnít cheap but for a small camera like a 1dxII or the new Nikon mirrorless it was amazing, especially if the camera autofocuses reliably.

The most prevalent equipment was LED lighting.  There had to be 25 booths featuring lighting, mostly LEDs.   One company had a bank of LED lights that was one of the brightest lights Iíve seen.  I asked how bright it goes, so the rep pointed it at the floor (and this is a very big light) and kicked it up for about 5 seconds.  It was so bright it lit up at least 1/4 to 1/3 of the expo, floor. 

My point is a lot of innovation is going to motion equipment that has a lot of crossover from motion to still photography applications and many of the visitors I talked to, regardless of reputation or size of projects they work on, even though most are filmmakers many I spoke to  have been asked to shoot stills during production, especially commercial shoots. 

How does this post have relevance to LL?  Well, the thing I noticed was the diversity of visitors at the bsc, from 20ís to late 60ís.   Everyone I spoke to worked in image making with passion and there was no real separation due to age, national origin or gender.   I would imagine if someone shot an overhead of the crowd, it probably is the market LL could thrive on with these active participants.

IMO

BC
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josh.reichmann

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Re: The Changing Landscape
« Reply #294 on: February 04, 2019, 01:10:14 pm »

Wonderful to hear about a Roger Deakins show such as this.
Completely agree to the cross over of DOP / image makers and photographers ! Both through shared gear/tech and by vertue of the shared passion and impulse to make, story tell, share and explore !

Appreciated
Josh
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LesPalenik

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Re: The Changing Landscape
« Reply #295 on: February 04, 2019, 01:14:43 pm »

All I can say - the more productive and informative posts and articles (and we've seen some already), the better!

32BT

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Re: The Changing Landscape
« Reply #296 on: February 04, 2019, 01:35:47 pm »

What, if anything, should a Buddhist photograph?

"The essence" I like to think.

Particularly "the essence of visual beauty", using "beauty" in the broadest sense of the word. Buddhism teaches us to observe without prejudice, to consider the whole, but still acknowledge the essential markers in an holistic view. It seems appropriate that it is a photographer's task to document the visual essentials that life offers to each of us and to the photographer individually.
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josh.reichmann

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Re: The Changing Landscape
« Reply #297 on: February 04, 2019, 01:39:22 pm »

+100
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Rand47

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Re: The Changing Landscape
« Reply #298 on: February 04, 2019, 01:48:12 pm »

Quote
And so the question needs to be asked ó What, if anything, should a Buddhist photograph?. . .

It seems the closer one attained to nirvana the less relevance photography has, until, photography itself can be abandoned as an encumbrance.

Rand
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josh.reichmann

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Re: The Changing Landscape
« Reply #299 on: February 04, 2019, 01:51:21 pm »

Nirvana is not somewhere else to be striven for.
Samsara and Nirvana are one
 ;)
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