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Author Topic: Bondage store  (Read 1611 times)

GreggP

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Bondage store
« on: May 27, 2018, 10:06:34 pm »

After reading all the comments from the 'Street Art' post, I'm hesitant to post anything in this 'Street Showcase', but I'm here to learn and since I might be under the misconception that this is a street photo, I'd like to learn why some people think it is not. In addition, even if you think it may qualify, let me know what you don't like about it but try to be constructive, instead of dismissive. Like I said, I'm here to learn.

I liked the juxtaposition of my daughter reflected in the window and the bondage mannequin. I also like that the real people are fragmented by the glass, a post, and the reflections and the clearest subject is artificial.


Reflections on a Bondage Club by Gregg Plummer, on Flickr

For people who don't know my daughter they probably wouldn't get this. So the value of this photo may be limited to its personal appeal.
« Last Edit: May 27, 2018, 11:22:49 pm by GreggP »
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Two23

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Re: Bondage store
« Reply #1 on: May 27, 2018, 11:47:30 pm »

Reflection shots are among my favorite, but to be candid this one is just too busy for me.  Keep trying though! :D


Kent in SD
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OmerV

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Re: Bondage store
« Reply #2 on: May 28, 2018, 08:04:26 am »

After reading all the comments from the 'Street Art' post, I'm hesitant to post anything in this 'Street Showcase', but I'm here to learn and since I might be under the misconception that this is a street photo, I'd like to learn why some people think it is not. In addition, even if you think it may qualify, let me know what you don't like about it but try to be constructive, instead of dismissive. Like I said, I'm here to learn.

I liked the juxtaposition of my daughter reflected in the window and the bondage mannequin. I also like that the real people are fragmented by the glass, a post, and the reflections and the clearest subject is artificial.


Reflections on a Bondage Club by Gregg Plummer, on Flickr

For people who don't know my daughter they probably wouldn't get this. So the value of this photo may be limited to its personal appeal.

Store window photography can indeed be street. In fact, Eugene Atget, who is considered the starter of street photography by many, made some great window reflection pictures using a dry plate camera, no less.

But it can be a cheap trick. I’ve done dozens that are no more than the equivalent of cotton candy. Apparently your photo has a secret that only you can decipher, meaning it is a family picture I guess. Albeit a creative one.

But when it works, it can be transportive.

RSL

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Re: Bondage store
« Reply #3 on: May 28, 2018, 08:20:41 am »

Omer, Atget's work was magnificent, and it's been a source of inspiration to the photographers who followed him, including Cartier-Bresson who bought a couple of Atget's prints, and for a short time used a view camera. But he didn't do street photography. You simply can't do it with a view camera. He posed some people in some of his shots. That's all.

OmerV

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Re: Bondage store
« Reply #4 on: May 28, 2018, 08:48:10 am »

Omer, Atget's work was magnificent, and it's been a source of inspiration to the photographers who followed him, including Cartier-Bresson who bought a couple of Atget's prints, and for a short time used a view camera. But he didn't do street photography. You simply can't do it with a view camera. He posed some people in some of his shots. That's all.

Russ, for the record I disagree with you. Let’s leave it at that and not hijack this thread. I won’t reply again.

RSL

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Re: Bondage store
« Reply #5 on: May 28, 2018, 09:26:28 am »

How about an example of a street shot by Atget, Omer? You can post the link here if you can find one you think is street.

RSL

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Re: Bondage store
« Reply #6 on: May 28, 2018, 09:28:43 am »

And Gregg, I didn't mean to pass over your picture. It's good shooting, though I agree with Kent that it's too busy.

elliot_n

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Re: Bondage store
« Reply #7 on: May 28, 2018, 09:59:52 am »

Street photography began in 1839.

Russ, why not broaden your horizons and re-read your copy of Colin Westerbeck's 'Bystander: A History of Street Photography' (the seminal book on the subject). It is replete with examples of street photography from the nineteenth century.

Here is a street photograph from New York in 1898 – Joseph and Percy Byron's, 'Broadway North from Thirty-eighth Street'. It features unposed people going about their everyday business. It's photographed on the street, it's in black and white, and there's a visual gag (the striped dress/striped awnings). What more do you want?! (There are also a couple of Atget's images in the slideshow.):

https://edition.cnn.com/style/article/street-photography-through-the-ages/index.html?gallery=%2F%2Fcdn.cnn.com%2Fcnnnext%2Fdam%2Fassets%2F171109112112-broadway-north-from-thirty-eighth-street-1898-by-joseph-and-percy-byron.jpg&inlineGallery=%2Fstyle%2Fgallery%2Fstreet-photography-through-the-ages%2Findex.html
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Two23

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Re: Bondage store
« Reply #8 on: May 28, 2018, 10:01:51 am »

Here's a shot I did two months ago using a window reflection.  Location is the downtown of my small city--a restaurant window.  It's a self portrait I took during an April blizzard.  Note that there aren't a lot of extraneous reflections to confuse the eye.  The entire image is a reflection.  Camera was a Nikon F3T, Nikon 28mm f2 AiS, HP5.


Kent in SD
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RSL

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Re: Bondage store
« Reply #9 on: May 28, 2018, 10:19:33 am »

Street photography began in 1839.

Russ, why not broaden your horizons and re-read your copy of Colin Westerbeck's 'Bystander: A History of Street Photography' (the seminal book on the subject). It is replete with examples of street photography from the nineteenth century.

Here is a street photograph from New York in 1898 – Joseph and Percy Byron's, 'Broadway North from Thirty-eighth Street'. It features unposed people going about their everyday business. It's photographed on the street, it's in black and white, and there's a visual gag (the striped dress/striped awnings). What more do you want?! (There are also a couple of Atget's images in the slideshow.):

https://edition.cnn.com/style/article/street-photography-through-the-ages/index.html?gallery=%2F%2Fcdn.cnn.com%2Fcnnnext%2Fdam%2Fassets%2F171109112112-broadway-north-from-thirty-eighth-street-1898-by-joseph-and-percy-byron.jpg&inlineGallery=%2Fstyle%2Fgallery%2Fstreet-photography-through-the-ages%2Findex.html

Hi Elliot, Clearly you haven't looked at the bibliography I've had on my web for a decade or more at http://www.pkinfo.com//Bib/Bib.html. Had you looked you'd know Bystander is the first book I posted in that bibliography with the comment that it's my all-time favorite photography book. But as I recall, Westerbrook isn't calling pictures of New York streets in 1898 "street photography" any more than he's calling Fox Talbot's pictures of people street photography. He laid down a pretty thorough background on the development of photography before he got into actual street photographers. You probably ought to reread the book.

elliot_n

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Re: Bondage store
« Reply #10 on: May 28, 2018, 10:56:57 am »

He calls all his nineteenth century examples 'street photography'. His history of street photography is a catholic one. He doesn't set out rules and regulations.
« Last Edit: May 28, 2018, 11:01:15 am by elliot_n »
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Rob C

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Re: Bondage store
« Reply #11 on: May 28, 2018, 11:35:50 am »

I'm seriously concerned about the direction LuLa is taking: Bondage Stores? Whatever next! This used to be a safe, reliable family programme website - what could I tell my twelve-year-old if asked about buying a bondage? Would I have to lie, and say I know nothing about bonds?

Rob

RSL

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Re: Bondage store
« Reply #12 on: May 28, 2018, 11:40:21 am »

He calls all his nineteenth century examples 'street photography'.

Page reference, please.

elliot_n

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Re: Bondage store
« Reply #13 on: May 28, 2018, 11:54:56 am »

There are many pages! Here's one example (page 73 of the 2001 paperback edition – first page of chapter 3):

'Typical of this period would be Scottish photographer John Thompson, who published several travel books as well as, in 1877, 'Street Life in London', the first book ever devoted exclusively to street photography.'

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OmerV

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Re: Bondage store
« Reply #14 on: May 28, 2018, 11:56:33 am »

I'm seriously concerned about the direction LuLa is taking: Bondage Stores? Whatever next! This used to be a safe, reliable family programme website - what could I tell my twelve-year-old if asked about buying a bondage? Would I have to lie, and say I know nothing about bonds?

Rob

???  Didn’t realize typing in question marks would become an emoji.

Well, this is funny, but unfortunately in the US there is a real threat from religious fanatics on freedom of... you name it.
« Last Edit: May 28, 2018, 12:04:12 pm by OmerV »
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Slobodan Blagojevic

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Re: Bondage store
« Reply #15 on: May 28, 2018, 12:15:26 pm »

He calls all his nineteenth century examples 'street photography'. His history of street photography is a catholic one. He doesn't set out rules and regulations.

Probably “street” in the sense most people understand it, i.e., related to the street, all things street. Early examples shown are mostly documentary photography done on the street.

Btw, you lost me with “Catholic history.” Care to explain?

RSL

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Re: Bondage store
« Reply #16 on: May 28, 2018, 12:21:19 pm »

There are many pages! Here's one example (page 73 of the 2001 paperback edition – first page of chapter 3):

'Typical of this period would be Scottish photographer John Thompson, who published several travel books as well as, in 1877, 'Street Life in London', the first book ever devoted exclusively to street photography.'

I looked it up, and you're right, Elliot. And Thomson did his "street photography" with wet plates! But I think it would have been better if Westerbeck had used the term, "photography on the street" rather than "street photography." Meyerowitz certainly knew the difference because he did street photography. Interestingly, the picture "Temperance Sweep" is exactly the one I had in mind when we started this discussion. That poor chimney sweep being posed stiffly, uncomfortably and unmoving by Thomson. You probably ought to get out your view camera and wet plates and do some "street photography."

elliot_n

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Re: Bondage store
« Reply #17 on: May 28, 2018, 12:27:38 pm »


Btw, you lost me with “Catholic history.” Care to explain?


catholic. adjective. including a wide variety of things; all-embracing. "her tastes are pretty catholic"
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elliot_n

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Re: Bondage store
« Reply #18 on: May 28, 2018, 12:40:21 pm »

It seems to me that ‘street photography’, as a term, is relatively new.

Searching Google Books reveals that the term ‘street photography’ wasn’t really used until the late 1970s. Usage then plateaued in the 80s, before getting a major boost in the mid 90s (no doubt after the publication of Westerbeck’s book).

https://books.google.com/ngrams/graph?content=street+photography&year_start=1839&year_end=2018&corpus=15&smoothing=3&share=&direct_url=t1%3B%2Cstreet%20photography%3B%2Cc0

‘Street photography’, as currently conceived, is a modern, post-internet phenomenon. 15 years ago, according to Google Trends, ’photojournalism’ had twice as many Google searches as ‘street photography’. Today our interests have flipped and the search term ‘street photography’ is three times more popular than ‘photojournalism’.

https://trends.google.com/trends/explore?date=all&q=street%20photography,photojournalism
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JNB_Rare

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Re: Bondage store
« Reply #19 on: May 28, 2018, 12:53:45 pm »

Here's a "young gun" street photographer (Eric Kim) talking about Weegee (Arthur Fellig) and his 4 x 5 Speed Graphic. 10 Lessons Weegee has taught me about street photography
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