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Author Topic: Microplastics in Arctic Ocean  (Read 8845 times)

Slobodan Blagojevic

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Re: Microplastics in Arctic Ocean
« Reply #140 on: April 27, 2018, 08:55:58 PM »

Peter McLennan

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Re: Microplastics in Arctic Ocean
« Reply #141 on: April 27, 2018, 08:58:34 PM »

OK, then.  Many.

Kent in SD: did you go to the images on the sites referenced?  Nobody arranged those plastic bits.
« Last Edit: April 27, 2018, 11:50:41 PM by Peter McLennan »
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digitaldog

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Re: Microplastics in Arctic Ocean
« Reply #142 on: April 27, 2018, 09:07:09 PM »

Some argument.
All off topic! That’s what happens in hijacked, political off topic post agendas.
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Andrew Rodney
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Slobodan Blagojevic

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Re: Microplastics in Arctic Ocean
« Reply #143 on: April 27, 2018, 09:18:31 PM »

All off topic!...

Is it?

I thought it was you who suggested to fight the plastic in the ocean with societal,cultural changes (like using less plastic and disposables). I am merely pointing out one societal, cultural aspect that is not going to change anytime soon. Like a genie back to bottle, women won't go back to the kitchen, hence the disposables are going to stay with us... and in the oceans. Until we collect them and properly dispose.

digitaldog

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Re: Microplastics in Arctic Ocean
« Reply #144 on: April 27, 2018, 09:32:21 PM »

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Andrew Rodney
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LesPalenik

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Re: Microplastics in Arctic Ocean
« Reply #145 on: April 27, 2018, 09:34:43 PM »

It appears to me that either wave action caused bits of plastic to lodge in the bird carcass as they washed back and forth, or someone carefully placed at least some if it there.  As someone with a medical science degree, I highly doubt the bird swallowed all that plastic and died from it.

Kent in SD

Kent, here is a 7 min. video about the plastics in the oceans, and about in the middle of it (3:15), Dr. Jennifer Lavers, a marine scientist starts to dissect a shearwater (medium size seabird), and pull out plastic pieces from its stomach. You can watch her to pull out 234 pieces of plastic in different sizes from that bird and spreading it on the table (4:15). All washed and cleaned up at this time. According to the researcher, the record number of plastics for that species was 276 pieces!

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ju_2NuK5O-E

Peter McLennan

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Re: Microplastics in Arctic Ocean
« Reply #146 on: April 27, 2018, 11:51:51 PM »

All off topic! That’s what happens in hijacked, political off topic post agendas.

Mea culpa.  Fed the troll.  Apologies.
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tom b

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Re: Microplastics in Arctic Ocean
« Reply #147 on: April 28, 2018, 02:19:48 AM »

Phil, I'm old enough to have seen this kind of doomsday crap over and over and over. We're still here. We'll probably still be here for a long time to come. A much more serious threat is something like an asteroid strike. But that's not a concern of left-wing politics, so nobody's hiding under the bed because of it.

Russ, it seems you're dead on the money. Catastrophic asteroid impact

Cheers,
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Tom Brown

Rob C

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Re: Microplastics in Arctic Ocean
« Reply #148 on: April 28, 2018, 07:07:43 AM »

Russ, it seems you're dead on the money. Catastrophic asteroid impact

Cheers,

 
This is a good example of things about which we should stop worrying because there's precious little we can do about it, and that's in stark contrast with all the man-sponsored problems about which we could and should be doing things about.

Ray

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Re: Microplastics in Arctic Ocean
« Reply #149 on: April 28, 2018, 08:45:57 AM »

Just came across the following news item from Thailand, which is a country where littering on the beaches is a major problem. Perhaps the Western tourists can set an example.  ;)

"Impressive" Swiss ladies clearing up Samui but the locals should be "ashamed of themselves."

"Daily News reported that two Swiss tourists were going the extra mile to clear up the beach at Samui.
But two local officials had a go at their litter-tossing compatriots saying they should be ashamed that tourists were clearing up their mess.

The media met up with the two Swiss ladies who they called Fabian, 23, and Jamin, 31.
Fabian said they love Samui and could do nothing as trash blew in to Ban Beach, Mae Nam, off the sea. So they asked the bungalow where they were staying for bin bags and picked up the rubbish over a five kilometer stretch.
Their haul included plastic, foam and bottles."


https://www.dailynews.co.th/regional/640481
« Last Edit: April 28, 2018, 08:48:59 AM by Ray »
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Slobodan Blagojevic

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Re: Microplastics in Arctic Ocean
« Reply #150 on: April 28, 2018, 09:48:45 AM »

...  Unfortunately at the same time, home ec (along with shop and tech classes) are being taken away from high schools, creating many other problems..l

Let’s teach #ADULTING in schools again

https://www.facebook.com/attnlife/videos/1843185669277107/

Sorry about the Facebook link, couldn’t find the original source.

Rob C

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Re: Microplastics in Arctic Ocean
« Reply #151 on: April 29, 2018, 06:38:56 AM »

Let’s teach #ADULTING in schools again

https://www.facebook.com/attnlife/videos/1843185669277107/

Sorry about the Facebook link, couldn’t find the original source.

Is that the verb derived from adultery?

Robert Roaldi

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Re: Microplastics in Arctic Ocean
« Reply #152 on: April 30, 2018, 04:08:21 PM »

I'm trying to understand why people would NOT be worried about micro-plastics getting into their bodies. Do you think we evolved to deal with that?

You know guys, just because something is vaguely lefty or greenpeace-y or downtown liberal-y, that doesn't mean you have to come down against it just to piss those people off. Nobody is verifying your tribal credentials, you know.
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LesPalenik

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Re: Microplastics in Arctic Ocean
« Reply #153 on: April 30, 2018, 04:22:43 PM »

Unfortunately, we are already ingesting microplastics, not only from the tapwater, but even more worrisome to some, also by drinking beer.

Quote
The analysis of tap water samples from around the world found that a high proportion of drinking water is contaminated with microscopic fragments of plastic (83% of samples collected worldwide, but up to 94% in the USA). Microplastic contamination seems more widespread than we perhaps knew, and they are regularly being ingested by people worldwide. Most concerning is how little is known about the effects of microplastic consumption on human health.

As of 2015, 6300 million tonnes of plastic waste have been generated, around 9% of which was recycled, 12% was incinerated, and 79% ended up in landfills or the environment. The issue of large plastic items polluting the world's oceans is well known, leading to policies that aim to limit the production and use of plastic bags and bottles, and increase recycling. However, a key problem with plastics is that they are essentially indestructible; rather than being biodegraded, they break down into smaller and smaller pieces, eventually becoming microscopic fragments. We should no longer just be concerned with large plastic items clogging up oceans and waterways, but also more attention needs to be paid to these tiny fragments and their effects on planetary health.

The tapwater study is not the first to indicate that microplastics are being consumed by humans. A 2014 study of German beer brands found that microplastics were present in all of the samples, and a Parisian study showed microplastics not just in water but also in the air. Microplastics are also routinely ingested by fish and shellfish. But the apparent widespread presence of microplastics in tapwater is particularly concerning because it points to substantial contamination of terrestrial and freshwater—as well as marine—ecosystems.

https://www.thelancet.com/journals/lanplh/article/PIIS2542-5196(17)30121-3/fulltext

Rob C

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Re: Microplastics in Arctic Ocean
« Reply #154 on: April 30, 2018, 05:34:26 PM »

I'm trying to understand why people would NOT be worried about micro-plastics getting into their bodies. Do you think we evolved to deal with that?

You know guys, just because something is vaguely lefty or greenpeace-y or downtown liberal-y, that doesn't mean you have to come down against it just to piss those people off. Nobody is verifying your tribal credentials, you know.

It's the same problem we see with governments and oppositions: all they care about is bringing down the power in charge at the time, not at all about the matters to hand.

So pitiful for countries to be ruined run that way.

Slobodan Blagojevic

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Re: Microplastics in Arctic Ocean
« Reply #155 on: June 13, 2018, 10:54:46 AM »

One possible contribution to the solution:

https://www.facebook.com/WeNeedThisbyattn/videos/214218579080015/

The video (sorry for the FB link) is about  “shampoo bars [that] could replace the 552 million shampoo bottles we throw out annually.”

LesPalenik

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Re: Microplastics in Arctic Ocean
« Reply #156 on: June 13, 2018, 04:23:34 PM »

Thanks for mentioning it, Slobodan
I never knew such shampoo bars existed, I'll try it out. I see that the Lush company sold 12,000 Shampoo Bars in the last two days thanks to that video. Great also for camping and travelling.

Jim Pascoe

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Re: Microplastics in Arctic Ocean
« Reply #157 on: June 15, 2018, 04:53:41 AM »

After having another quick skim through this topic I noticed earlier that it was claimed that 90% of ocean plastics come out of ten major rivers.  Would it not be possible to put big nets across the mouths of these rivers to catch the larger plastic items before they reach the ocean and eventually break down into microplastics?

Now I know that is a very simplistic suggestion, as some of these rivers are quite big and carry a lot of traffic - but seems to make sense to me.......

Jim

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stamper

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Re: Microplastics in Arctic Ocean
« Reply #158 on: June 15, 2018, 07:02:20 AM »

After having another quick skim through this topic I noticed earlier that it was claimed that 90% of ocean plastics come out of ten major rivers.  Would it not be possible to put big nets across the mouths of these rivers to catch the larger plastic items before they reach the ocean and eventually break down into microplastics?

Now I know that is a very simplistic suggestion, as some of these rivers are quite big and carry a lot of traffic - but seems to make sense to me.......

Jim



Unless you are in a submarine? :-\

Alan Klein

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Re: Microplastics in Arctic Ocean
« Reply #159 on: June 16, 2018, 08:25:41 AM »

It happens that I  am a man who cooks, cleans, and cares for the children in  essentially the same way the stereotypical 1950s housewife did, while my wife works. By good luck and good planning, we're able to make this work out. It is not necessary for both of us to work outside the home.

An alternate take from Mr. Blagojevic's is that capitalism run rampant has forced the working class into a  situation in which both partners in the family must work to make ends meet, leading to the aforementioned rise is disposables. I find the whole thing somewhat tenuous at best, but if you insist on "less cooking and housekeeping" is the cause of plastic in the ocean, then the cause of the cause can be attributed somewhat better to insufficiently fettered capitalism than it can be some vague leftist agenda.

That wages of the working class have been essentially flat for decades is undisputed. That Capitalists are doing increasingly better is undisputed. That the wage gap has been expanding for decades and continues to do so is undisputed. It is, from  these undisputed facts, a very very small step to "insufficiently fettered Capitalism is the major cause the both-parents-work situation"

Of course the leftist agenda did include the idea of choices in work, but as usual the Capitalists co-opted this and turned it in to  "No, no, it's not that we would prefer that We Get the Money and You Do Not, it's OPPORTUNITY!" but that is an obvious sham.


It's not capitalism that forced both spouses to have to work to make ends meet.  It's higher taxes caused by more socialist spending by federal, state and local governments including income, sales, property, social security, medicare, and other taxes.  When I first started working, social security was 3% and there were no medicare deductions.  Now SS and medicare total is 7.65%, more than double which is then doubled since the employer has to match it.  That's only one example.  The idea that capitalism makes things more expensive is just Marxist nonsense.  It makes things cheaper by providing more competition and creates more wealth and jobs than any other economic system.  Just look what happened to Venezuela when the government took over industry and ran markets.  The people there are starving.  At least the wives don't have to work because there is no work!  Neither do husbands.

Plastic is cheaper than a lot of products made the "old" way.  It's lighter than glass for example in soda bottles and doesn't break making it safer around all people especially children.    It does have its downsides like everything else in creation. But "old" methods also have negatives.  On balance I think plastic is amazing and has advanced human societies in a positive way.  Here in NJ re-cycling plastics is helping the situation.  In some state, you have to pay a deposit on the plastic bottle so it encourages returns where they are recycled.   I wonder how much sea life is using that floating plastic for their homes like in the Sargasso Sea where floating logs, sea weed and just plain crap provide protection and homes for many species. 
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