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Author Topic: New Camera Orbiting Jupiter  (Read 20985 times)

Telecaster

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Re: New Camera Orbiting Jupiter
« Reply #100 on: February 23, 2019, 04:07:28 pm »

Extraordinary images!

Yes! JunoCam and its team of citizen science image processors have delivered the goods for sure. Lots more to come too!

-Dave-
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Telecaster

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Re: New Camera Orbiting Jupiter
« Reply #101 on: February 23, 2019, 04:20:17 pm »

OT again: the highest-res full image of 2014 MU69 ("Ultima Thule") captured by New Horizons during its New Years Day flyby. I believe there may be some higher-res partial images yet to come… I've also included a colorized version of another image in the sequence based on early MVIC color data via the Planetary Society. NASA's own official color images will come later.

The bright line at the point where MU69's two lobes join together appears to be caused by the lobes pulling away slightly from each other, exposing cleaner underlying material (likely ice).

-Dave-
« Last Edit: February 23, 2019, 04:23:49 pm by Telecaster »
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Peter McLennan

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Re: New Camera Orbiting Jupiter
« Reply #102 on: February 23, 2019, 08:34:41 pm »

Fantastic.
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Telecaster

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Re: New Camera Orbiting Jupiter
« Reply #103 on: February 24, 2019, 12:17:41 am »

More Perijove #18, this time via Eichstädt and Doran. This is a composite of three frames.

-Dave-
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Telecaster

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Re: New Camera Orbiting Jupiter
« Reply #104 on: February 27, 2019, 04:21:13 pm »

Here's a new one from Perijove #17 via Gerald Eichstädt & Seán Doran.

-Dave-
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Peter McLennan

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Re: New Camera Orbiting Jupiter
« Reply #105 on: February 27, 2019, 08:16:25 pm »

If somebody had shown me that image a few years ago and said "This is what Jupiter looks like", I'd have said "Do you have any of that stuff left?"  :)
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Telecaster

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Re: New Camera Orbiting Jupiter
« Reply #106 on: February 28, 2019, 03:41:54 pm »

Yep, this last one does have a "lysergic pastel" vibe.  ;D  All kinds of small storms swirling around the closer (to the poles) we look.

-Dave-
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32BT

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Re: New Camera Orbiting Jupiter
« Reply #107 on: March 01, 2019, 03:03:26 am »

I personally think they are going completely overboard with the local contrast adjustment. It suggests layered swirls in a more or less clear medium (like earth has a clear atmosphere) and yet the planet's sillhouette suggests nothing like that, and instead looks like completely dense, gaseous materials or fluids.

It's a giant, gaseous, comet eating monster is what it is. All the swirls are impact craters with the comets completely evaporated to their bare materials.
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Telecaster

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Re: New Camera Orbiting Jupiter
« Reply #108 on: March 01, 2019, 04:36:28 pm »

If you scroll through the images here, or at NASA's JunoCam site, you'll see a mix of heavily- and lightly-processed ones. Some of 'em go overboard to my taste but others, while still obviously processed, IMO look great nonetheless. I like this latest one a lot…the high contrast reveals atmospheric structure that's otherwise easy to miss.

The storms are very much that: hurricane/cyclone-like systems. Jupiter does get hit with plenty of asteroids and meteroids along with the occasional comet, but when they leave visible traces it's typically in the form of dark "bruises" as with pieces of comet Shoemaker-Levy 9 in 1994.

-Dave-
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Telecaster

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Re: New Camera Orbiting Jupiter
« Reply #109 on: March 05, 2019, 03:25:32 pm »

Another OT post. Due to Apollo 11's upcoming 50th anniversary, the space-centric image processing folks have been working with fresh high-res scans of the photos taken during that mission. Here's one of 'em as processed by Seàn Doran.

Edit: totally messed up here. The attached pic is actually from the Apollo 17 mission. T'was processed by Seàn Doran, though. It's not just Apollo 11 images being re-archived digitally. Oy…

-Dave-
« Last Edit: March 08, 2019, 04:40:01 pm by Telecaster »
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Peter McLennan

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Re: New Camera Orbiting Jupiter
« Reply #110 on: March 05, 2019, 06:52:49 pm »

Lovely new rendition of the iconic image.  I'd love to be able to purchase a 50MB file of that image.  My HP 3200 would LOVE it.  :)
Looking forward to seeing "Apollo 11".  A pal just viewed a 70mm print in Vancouver.  Envious doesn't cover it.
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Telecaster

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Re: New Camera Orbiting Jupiter
« Reply #111 on: March 06, 2019, 03:30:31 pm »

Probably gonna see Apollo 11 tomorrow. I'm glad all the high-res footage NASA shot is finally being presented properly!

-Dave-
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Telecaster

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Re: New Camera Orbiting Jupiter
« Reply #112 on: March 06, 2019, 05:02:04 pm »

Brief Twitter conversation on JunoCam image processing approaches:

Q: Do you know what the process re. colors is? I am never sure w/ "space pictures." Are the colors as the camera percieved them? As we would perceive them?

Seàn Doran: These colors exist in the source data but they are enhanced to assist details. In reality Jupiter is more muted.

Kevin Gill: Right. Here's a comparison I put together showing approximate true color and enhanced. While both are beautiful, I tend to like to bring out the hidden details and hues. [See attached pic.]

-Dave-
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Telecaster

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Re: New Camera Orbiting Jupiter
« Reply #113 on: March 09, 2019, 05:39:51 pm »

JunoCam image processor Björn Jònsson: "An orthographic mosaic from images PJ18_28 and PJ18_29 from Feb 12, 2019. Approx true color/contrast version and a version with enhanced contrast and colors. North is up. The circular spot slightly above the image center is at planetographic latitude 51.5 deg north."

-Dave-
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