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Author Topic: Fixed Lens Compact Camera for Landscape Photography  (Read 14605 times)

Isaac

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Re: Fixed Lens Compact Camera for Landscape Photography
« Reply #20 on: February 02, 2016, 01:05:02 pm »

So it's not a big help for deciding whether 28mm or 35mm. :(

I asked about the focal lengths you tended to use, in-order to make more concrete what you'd give up.

I use 52mm and 127mm (equiv) and stitch for width (handheld or tripod), and focus-stack for dof (tripod).

Does anyone sell an 85mm fixed lens compact camera? :-)
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biker

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Re: Fixed Lens Compact Camera for Landscape Photography
« Reply #21 on: February 02, 2016, 05:08:02 pm »

Do you have a favored focal length range for landscape photography? The exiftools program counts all sorts of photographs, portraits, landscapes, street, etc.
You're 100% right. The chart posted is from 2013 holiday in Sweden/Norway and those 55mm x 1.5 shots are in most cases reindeer that weren't willing to come closer. :)

I'm curious to know why you have decided to ditch the zooms? It seems from the EXIF data that you will find difficulty not having that flexibility.
The main reasons are at the start of this thread. Compact size and a great IQ at the same time.
I would add nostalgia reasons and preventing flattened zoomed shots because of my laziness.

Does anyone sell an 85mm fixed lens compact camera? :-)
Sigma DP3 Merill? It's 75mm equiv., sorry. ;)

Thank you all for other tips!
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luxborealis

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Re: Fixed Lens Compact Camera for Landscape Photography
« Reply #22 on: February 03, 2016, 12:00:30 am »

biker is also shooting a lot at the narrowest focal length, and biker is also shooting a lot in-between ;-)

You are correct, to a point. There are some in between (in fact in a relative sense, few) as would happen with a zoom, but, with the vast majority at either end, it is likely (though not definite) most of his landscapes are made at the wider end. But only he can confirm that.
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biker

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Re: Fixed Lens Compact Camera for Landscape Photography
« Reply #23 on: February 03, 2016, 04:35:51 pm »

Is that what you do?

Yeah, it looks so (according to the statistics). And there aren't included source shots for panoramas that would make it even more pronounced.

I'm adding two more charts from (basically) the same place:
2007 - 35mm - 210mm equiv. (ultrazoom)
2015 - 28mm - 112mm equiv.
I'm shooting also different landscape types, of course. But the wide end seems to be more or less prevailing.
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luxborealis

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Re: Fixed Lens Compact Camera for Landscape Photography
« Reply #24 on: February 03, 2016, 06:59:51 pm »

Did you count?

It depends what you choose as the boundaries between wide, normal, tele -- but with that data you'll probably end-up with 200 normal and 400-500 at each end.


Is that what you do?

It's not about me, Isaac. It's about landscape photography. :D

I'm going out on a limb here, but I think it's safe to say that most landscape photography is done with focal lengths in the wideangle range. You may be itching to argue the opposite, and certainly, at times,  many of us use normal and telephoto for landscapes as well, but I don't think I'm too far off the mark in recognizing the predominance of wideangle use for landscapes.

Hence my recommendations, which appear to be born out in the OP's recent post.

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Isaac

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Re: Fixed Lens Compact Camera for Landscape Photography
« Reply #25 on: February 04, 2016, 12:17:49 pm »

Yeah, it looks so (according to the statistics).

You haven't turned the data into statistics yet ;-)

Choose some buckets to aggregate the data (<35 / 35<70 / 70<135 / >=135)  and then look.


And there aren't included source shots for panoramas that would make it even more pronounced.

Let's not confuse a wide composition with the need for a wide-angle lens.


2007 - 35mm - 210mm equiv. (ultrazoom)

I'd suggest that 2007 is only interesting as a way of seeing what you no-longer do.
« Last Edit: February 04, 2016, 02:09:12 pm by Isaac »
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AreBee

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Re: Fixed Lens Compact Camera for Landscape Photography
« Reply #26 on: February 04, 2016, 12:43:30 pm »

Terry,

Quote
There are some in between (in fact in a relative sense, few) as would happen with a zoom...

Why would using a zoom necessarily return few images, in a relative sense, between the upper- and lower-bound focal lengths of the lens?
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Isaac

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Re: Fixed Lens Compact Camera for Landscape Photography
« Reply #27 on: February 04, 2016, 12:45:19 pm »

It's not about me, Isaac.

No, it's not about you. I think we often recommend others do as we do -- hence my question.


…most landscape photography is done with focal lengths in the wide angle range. You may be itching to argue the opposite…

Near-far one-shot composition is done with wide-angle to exaggerate perspective. I don't think that's the be-all and end-all of landscape photography.

fwiw On a regular basis, a newbie will ask on one of the forums…”What wide angle lens should I get for landscapes“? … Of course, the reality is that landscape photography is seldom done with a WA lens.
« Last Edit: February 04, 2016, 02:07:31 pm by Isaac »
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luxborealis

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Re: Fixed Lens Compact Camera for Landscape Photography
« Reply #28 on: February 04, 2016, 07:10:50 pm »

Terry,

Why would using a zoom necessarily return few images, in a relative sense, between the upper- and lower-bound focal lengths of the lens?

Rob, if I truly thought you didn't know what I was talking about, I'd actually address your question. I don't have time for crap like this.

Frankly, this is not what I'm on the forum for. If you and Isaac have the time to nitpick every statement without actually moving the discussion along, then I truly feel sorry for you. You should spend more of time out photographing.

biker asked for a suggestion. Suggestions were provided. Disagree with those suggestions and counter-offer better suggestions, but don't start playing lawyer with semantics.
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Isaac

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Re: Fixed Lens Compact Camera for Landscape Photography
« Reply #29 on: February 04, 2016, 09:40:55 pm »

Why would using a zoom necessarily return few images, in a relative sense, between the upper- and lower-bound focal lengths of the lens?

It wouldn't necessarily.

However, I think as a result of my lack of skill with zoom lenses, and a desire for both more stretch and more reach; I did use the ends of the range more, even though I know the IQ is better mid-range.

Happily I took note, and traded in the zoom for my two fixed focal-length lenses. (I did buy another zoom lens, but only because it was a cheap way to have something that kind-of worked at 300mm equiv)
« Last Edit: February 05, 2016, 01:23:57 am by Isaac »
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ned

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Re: Fixed Lens Compact Camera for Landscape Photography
« Reply #30 on: February 05, 2016, 01:40:17 am »

My idea of a compact landscape camera is the Fuji Gw690iii. Beautiful 6x9 negative.  Compared to my 4x5 it's very compact.

Sent from my SM-N900V using Tapatalk

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AreBee

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Re: Fixed Lens Compact Camera for Landscape Photography
« Reply #31 on: February 05, 2016, 04:39:29 am »

Terry,

Quote
...if I truly thought you didn't know what I was talking about, I'd actually address your question. I don't have time for crap like this. Frankly, this is not what I'm on the forum for.

Quote
There are some in between (in fact in a relative sense, few) as would happen with a zoom...

I personally don't understand why using a zoom "would" return few images, in a relative sense, between the upper- and lower-bound focal lengths of the lens, but then I'm not the one who wrote it - you are.

When I don't understand, I ask. What I try to not do is disagree (or agree, for that matter) without first clarifying what was meant.

If I've missed something obvious, then by all means help me to understand your meaning. However, if you are unable to defend what you have written without becoming defensive when questioned on it, then simply do not write it.

Instead of being perturbed that someone has questioned you on what you have written, consider that some people closely read and carefully consider your every word.

Quote
If you and Isaac...

Thank you for your compliment.

Quote
You should spend more of time out photographing.

Of that there can be no doubt.


Isaac,

Quote
...I think as a result of my lack of skill with zoom lenses, and a desire for both more stretch and more reach...

The latter I can understand, but not the former. What skill is required with a zoom lens, more so than with a prime?
« Last Edit: February 05, 2016, 06:50:22 am by Rob B. »
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Chairman Bill

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Re: Fixed Lens Compact Camera for Landscape Photography
« Reply #32 on: February 05, 2016, 04:59:32 am »

I use a Fujifilm X100s when I don't want to carry my DSLR & a number of lenses. It does me just fine.

Isaac

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Re: Fixed Lens Compact Camera for Landscape Photography
« Reply #33 on: February 05, 2016, 12:49:05 pm »

What skill is required with a zoom lens, more so than with a prime?

I assume that others, more skilled, easily and quickly adjust both their position and the focal length. With a prime I seem more likely to take the photo quickly enough because the focal length is fixed, so I must adjust my position. One less variable.
« Last Edit: February 05, 2016, 12:59:20 pm by Isaac »
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SZRitter

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Re: Fixed Lens Compact Camera for Landscape Photography
« Reply #34 on: February 05, 2016, 02:12:31 pm »

I think there is an issue with zooms that people don't often talk about, but I have heard a few skilled photographers speak of.

Many people don't understand when to use what focal length or conceptualize where in the range they want it. A lot of people will walk up to the scene, zoom near to far, and then settle at one of those ends. Maybe move around a bit, and maybe use the zoom to compensate for walking. What they don't do is walk up to the scene and say "I want a 35mm because it will do {insert desired effect} to my shot". I feel like shooting with a prime or a bag full of primes really forces you to choose a lens for a certain reason, and enforces that even when you move back to zooms.

I, of course, guilty, do both. Sometimes I think about it, and sometimes I just want the quick grab shot or can't move. And a lot of the time I only have one focal length with me, very liberating.
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Isaac

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Re: Fixed Lens Compact Camera for Landscape Photography
« Reply #35 on: February 05, 2016, 03:55:30 pm »

…when to use what focal length or conceptualize where in the range they want it.

In the moment, I would fail to apply that understanding ;-)

(Jack Dykinga mentioned this issue in one of his books.)

For me, it's a matter of accepting that I invest so little time learning what to expect from the different focal lengths that 2 focal lengths are already at the limit of what I will successfully learn and retain. Even now I still almost feel surprise when I switch between 52mm and 127mm (equiv); but slowly I am becoming better at deciding how I'm going to approach a scene with the tools I have.
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luxborealis

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Re: Fixed Lens Compact Camera for Landscape Photography
« Reply #36 on: February 05, 2016, 06:13:17 pm »

If I've missed something obvious, then by all means help me to understand your meaning. However, if you are unable to defend what you have written without becoming defensive when questioned on it, then simply do not write it.

I was truly surprised by your ignorance on this topic, Rob. And, just to be clear, I never feel compelled to defend any position I may have on a discussion forum as this is a discussion forum, not a court of law. While that could be translated as "I can say whatever the h*** I want", it's not the tact I choose to take. Reasoned thought, I find, is most productive here. Boring for some who like to unnecessarily stir the pot, but helpful to the vast majority here who come to learn and not be pounced upon as it seems I did, quite unintentionally, to you. So, to answer your query....

It may sound pedantic, but what sometimes happens with photographers using zoom lenses is they choose specific focal lengths that match their vision of the scene, often based on focal lengths they may be familiar with through prior experience; e.g. 35mm or 50mm on a 24-85mm zoom. This would show up as a predominance of photos taken at specific focal lengths.

In the OP's case, he is using the zoom primarily at extremes. This, too, is not unusual and accounts for the dearth of photos at in-between focal lengths. The use of extremes may also indicate a user who would benefit from wider or longer focal lengths than the lens allows.

SZRitter points out a different use of zooms which results in a different profile of focal lengths. Someone who stands in one place and zooms to crop will have, perhaps, more photos between the two extremes and at more random focal lengths.

Of course, one can use a zoom in any number of different ways and completely ignore this over-analysis. Being completely free of the constraints of focal length is one of the advantages of zooms, but as I quoted in my original post from Orson Welles, "The enemy of art is the absence of limitations."
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AreBee

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Re: Fixed Lens Compact Camera for Landscape Photography
« Reply #37 on: February 05, 2016, 07:21:33 pm »

Terry,

Thank you for clarifying what was meant.
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Isaac

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Re: Fixed Lens Compact Camera for Landscape Photography
« Reply #38 on: February 05, 2016, 08:43:29 pm »

for my 18-55mm lens x1.5

476   < 35mm

408   35mm < 70mm

426   70mm < 135mm

0   >= 135mm
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AreBee

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Re: Fixed Lens Compact Camera for Landscape Photography
« Reply #39 on: February 08, 2016, 06:45:54 am »

Nancy,

Quote
I tend to like the 35mm to 40mm range for the landscape subjects that I shoot...

Given your use of a Canon 6D, perhaps you tend to perceive the landscape literally as your eye observes it.
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