Pages: [1] 2 3 ... 10
 1 
 on: Today at 12:18:53 am 
Started by stockjock - Last post by stockjock
Now that Adobe seems to be taking more advantage of GPU's in Lightroom and Photoshop I was wondering if anybody knew if upgrading to a Nvidia GeForce GTX 1660 Ti 6GB card would make any noticeable difference in performance compared to my current GeForce GTX 960 2GB card?  Lightroom is very sluggish with my current system despite 32 GB of DDR4 RAM.  It might just be the 3 1/2 year old Intel i7 6700K processor, or maybe the Lightroom catalog with 160,000 images, or driving a 4K monitor?  But Lightroom slows to a crawl, especially after editing more than a couple of images and I would welcome any suggestions about improving its performance.  The last LR update seems a little more stable but I've only used it for couple of days so that might be wishful thinking ;-).

 2 
 on: August 22, 2019, 11:59:55 pm 
Started by PDeXplore - Last post by PDeXplore
I think one of my biggest challenges starting out in photography is knowing the best places to go. Are there any great resources that you all know of, other than this forum? I know a lot of it is experience and knowing the right people, but being new to the hobby and the area, it's very frustrating and disheartening seeing so many amazing photos and not knowing where they are or how to get there.

Anyway, for this particular topic I'm hoping to find somewhere to practice shooting the milky way in the Portland area. Ideally something that's relatively easily accessible by car or a short walk. Hopefully something with one of the big mountains. I do have a location on the coast planned, but trying to think of backup locations if the weather on the coast is bad.

 3 
 on: August 22, 2019, 11:28:19 pm 
Started by BernardLanguillier - Last post by James Clark
Sometimes, people can be very mean.
Like when that nasty Danish Prime Minister said that the idea of buying Greenland was absurd. She really hurt Donald's feelings.

Which is really tragic and so unfair, considering how polite and considerate Donald is of everyone else’s feelings.  But then again, we and the media are expected to maintain a higher standard than the President of the United States.  Which is a perfectly rational belief. ;)

 4 
 on: August 22, 2019, 11:18:03 pm 
Started by BernardLanguillier - Last post by LesPalenik
Sometimes, people can be very mean.
Like when that nasty Danish Prime Minister said that the idea of buying Greenland was absurd. She really hurt Donald's feelings.

 5 
 on: August 22, 2019, 10:58:29 pm 
Started by mdshaw55 - Last post by JoeKitchen
Did you shot those wide open?  That could have had an effect and stopping it down would certainly be better. 

Also, how many times have you done this test and what kind of stand are you using?  It looks like you moved the camera ever so slightly between shots here. 

Is the spare shutter of the same generation and/or time period?  I have no idea if this would be the case, but Copal may have altered the shutter design in terms of leaf and aperture blade placement over the years. 

I carry two spare shutters with me for this same reason and have had to swap the shutter in my SK 35mm twice on set.  I also swapped out the shutter in my Rodie 55mm and 90mm so I could have the shutters repaired without loosing the lenses. 

I have never noticed any ill effects when swapping out shutters, other then the aperture scale is not there to reference.  So I typically have to gauge where f/11 is relative to the shutter speed scale on the original and use that as my guide on the new shutter. 

I know that the guys at Schneider and Rodenstock will advise against this, claiming that it will effect focus and that each lens is fitted to it shutter.  (But keep in mind, it’s there job to be finicky and they’re German.)  However, if this were the case, then the front groups of each lens would have to be shimmed so the distance would be precise and I have never found a shim at the front in the dozen lenses I have taken apart.  Bob Watkins, at Precision Camera near Chicago (were I get stuff repaired), told me that occasionally you will see a shim in the front.  However I feel like this would be for the rare cases where the shutter was just a little thinner then it should be. 

I also spoke to the techs at Fotocare about this as well, and they often swap out shutters too.  They told me that the critical focus point should not be effected.  If the thickness of the new shutter is far off from the last one, you will see a decrease in the depth of field, but I feel like this would be more applicable to long lenses and table top photography. 

I once read that Copal said two shutters could be off by as much as 24 microns.  Typically ranges like this are three standard deviations from the mean in both directions, so a range of six standard deviations in total, which covers 99.8% of cases, .  This means 4 is the standard deviation, and 68% of all variations are 1 standard deviation from the mean, or a range of 2.  So more then likely any two shutters will be off by less than 8 microns.  This is not that much. 

Neither Schneider nor Rodenstock give any torque measurements for screwing in either side of the lens to the shutter.  They both just say to screw it in until it is snug.  The difference between one person's snugness and another's could be 8 microns.  So I have to assume these lenses need to be made with a certain amount of operational variance in the distance between the front and rear. 

Point being, unless you are unlucky enough to get one of those shutters that is far off from the mean, I dont think it should matter if you swap out a shutter.  Do you have another shutter to test? 

 6 
 on: August 22, 2019, 10:53:01 pm 
Started by PeterJaay - Last post by TechTalk
I know, the highest-end market is very small. This is why I do not understand why Hasselblad and PhaseOne do not MERGE to one company! Together, they would be unbeatable. Hasselblads body and lenses, PhaseOnes backs and raw converter - "better do it quickly or you will both disappear" - that is what I am afraid of ...

You may be worrying too much. Both companies appear to be on solid footing.

Phase One's income is about 70% software sales. And given your ringing endorsement of their software, not much to worry about there. Adobe, of course, has substantial resources to put behind Lightroom as a competitor, but there seems to be plenty of room in the market for both, as well as the other free open-source and paid software options. The private equity firm, that recently aquired control of Phase One, paid 1.5 Billion Danish Kroner (about 220 million US Dollars) for the privilege, so I think they intend on keeping the doors open for a while. And I wouldn't worry about the fact that they've transitioned from being a hardware-centric to software-centric business. I don't see any indication that they want to exit their hardware business, despite however small the market may be. They've carved out their own niche in the market.  Danish business magazine on Phase One sale via Google Translate

Phase One is expecting to do almost 82 million US Dollars in worldwide sales this year and to earn about 22 million in profits. So don't lose any sleep.

Meanwhile, the DJI investment in Hasselblad seems to be paying dividends for both companies. In 2017, sales more than doubled for Hasselblad after the introduction of the X1D-50c. And the new X1D II-50c, as well as the new CFV II-50c / 907x combo, are generating a tremendous amount of pre-orders based on their sales ranking at B&H. They have rolled out steady firmware updates for the X1D making owners of that camera happier over time. H system users saw a major update in ease of use with a new interface in the H6 series along with 50, 100, and 400 MP single-shot or multi-shot versions. And now all the Hasselblad platforms H, X, and CFV share that same common user interface design, making moving from one system to another as seamless as possible.

I don't think there's ever been a better time to be a Hasselblad owner. Owners of legacy V system cameras will soon have a new digital back for their current cameras and lenses, plus the option to take that back and convert it into a unique compact mirrorless camera using new XCD lenses. If that wasn't enough choice, they can also mount their lenses from the V system on an H camera via the very nicely engineered CF adapter. The degree of integration between a V lens on an H body is impressive! Briefly, any H camera with CF adapter lets you mount vintage lenses with open aperture viewing, focusing, and metering. When you attach the CF adapter to any H body, it recognizes the adapter and automatically provides a list of lenses to select from to inform the camera which lens you're using for correct metering. Take a shot and it automatically stops down to your selected aperture. Push a lever on the adapter to reset the shutter and you're ready to go again. Film or digital capture, your choice. The adapter to allow V lenses to be used seamlessly on an H camera was part of the design process of the very first H1 camera. After decades of selling the V system, Hasselblad did not want loyal customers to have to buy all new lenses in order to use their new platform. Short term, maybe not a great business decision for a company that wants to sell new lenses. Long term, customers appreciate that kind of corporate philosophy. Years of planning and design went into developing the H1 before it was released. Hasselblad wanted the H platform to have a long life, just as the V system had that preceded it.

So basically if you have a V system, Hasselblad provides options to shoot film or digital and connect to either H cameras or XCD lenses. That's pretty good customer support for cameras and lenses made from 1957 to 2006. Oh, and you don't need any cables. Hasselblad's core philosophy has never changed. Design and build products that will provide customers with high-image quality, over many years, with as much modularity and as many options as possible. It explains a lot about brand loyalty when that loyalty from your customers is seen as being returned in kind.

OK, what about H system users? H system users have lots of options as well. Again film or digital, your choice. You can use vintage V lenses or H lenses. Your H lens options extend from 24mm to 300mm, two zoom lenses, 1.7x converter, macro converter, extension tubes, HTS 1.5 tilt/shift adapter to adapt any of 6 lenses from 24mm to 100mm into a tilt/shift lens with 1.5 x magnification (to enlarge the image circle) and giving a range of converted tilt/shift focal-lengths from 36mm to 150mm. Hasselblad offers the widest focal-length range of any medium-format DSLR camera maker as well as the broadest variety of lens accessories to extend the system capabilities. They also pioneered having automatic digital lens corrections integrated throughout a complete camera, lens, and software system to maximize image quality. Other companies have followed their leadership in total-system-integration over the years. It's also interesting to see that multi-shot capture is starting to appear in smaller format cameras now. What a difference that can make in image sharpness and quality, even in 4-shot mode. Eliminating interpolation can have quite a noticeable effect on image quality!

However, the H options don't end there. H system lens owners aren't limited to one platform. In addition to using HC/HCD lenses on an H camera, they can be mounted via the XH lens adapter to the X1D, X1D II, or even the new CFV-II / 907x combo. All with full lens shutter compatibility and autofocus (manual focus only with older H lenses). Leica S cameras have full autofocus and leaf shutter capability with your H lenses via their own H lens adapter. Even Alpa makes a lens adapter that allows full use of the H lens shutter, but with manual focus (the only medium-format lens adapter they make that allows for the built-in lens shutter to be used). If you own H lenses, you have lots of options! Of course, your H digital back can be used on a variety of view and technical cameras, including the multi-shot backs.

And for X system and 907x users, there is an ever expanding line of great XCD lenses from 21mm to 135mm f/2.8 (with a dedicated 1.7x converter to give you a 230mm f/4.8 ) and a new phenomenal quality zoom. https://cdn.hasselblad.com/datasheets/xcd-lenses/XCD35-75-Datasheet-en.pdf  Plus, the full range of H lenses as already mentioned. Plus the ability to use those XCD lenses in a different form factor with the upcoming CFV II / 907x. For tech camera use there's Alpa or view camera use with Cambo, but unlike all the other options discussed, the tech or view camera options with X1D models require using the sensor e-shutter. Oh, and X1D cameras are TTL compatible with flashes and triggers made for Nikon.  https://www.alpa.ch/en/site/alpa-connects-to-hasselblad-x-cameras  https://www.cambo.com/en/actus-series/actus-xcd-view-camera/  Wildlife Photoraphy Review with X1D II and HC 300mm Lens

And what does DJI get from Hasselblad other than affiliation with a legendary brand? Well, they get access to Hasselblad lens and camera design expertise as well as their sensor and color science knowledge. Plus, the opportunity to integrate Hasselblad A6D aerial cameras with their drone technology or work with Hasselblad to co-develop products like their Mavic Pro 2. https://www.hasselblad.com/a6d/  https://www.dji.com/mavic-2

The Metropolitan Museum of Art in New York City (The Met) has been using Hasselblad multi-shot cameras for several years to create a digital archive of their massive collection. Hasselblad has been collaborating with The Met's Advanced Imaging Center, The Rijksmuseum and Van Gogh Museum in Amsterdam, and many other of the world's most prestigious museums to advance the state-of-the art in cultural heritage digitization and set international standards for image quality since at least 2007. But here's an interesting use that The Met made of the DJI / Hasselblad A6D collaboration for cultural heritage preservation. https://dronedj.com/2018/10/12/dji-hasselblad-met-cloisters/

To summarize this little essay, I don't think you need to worry about Hasselblad or Phase One. You know, interestingly enough, Phase One has never stopped marketing their camera and back systems as "Open Platform" even to this day. The marketing message didn't change. They just redefined what it meant. But after typing all of the above regarding the modularity, openness, and cross-platform compatibility that Hasselblad has achieved, maybe Hasselblad should be the one using that slogan.  https://www.phaseone.com/en/Photography/Open-Platform-Philosophy

 7 
 on: August 22, 2019, 10:23:12 pm 
Started by BernardLanguillier - Last post by James Clark
His comment was a put-down.

I don't believe it was ;)

 8 
 on: August 22, 2019, 10:16:26 pm 
Started by BernardLanguillier - Last post by Alan Klein
Surely you see the difference here though?  You may have an understanding that there is more forest now than there was x years ago - you "believe" that to be true, but that's not really an opinion that's unknowable, and it *could* be incorrect.  Simply because you "believe" it makes it neither correct nor valid.

I can "believe" Donald Trump is a racist.  "Racist" is an inherently subjective term, and you and I can point to evidence, debate it, and come to perhaps equally valid conclusions.

On the other hand, I can "believe" that Donald Trump is honest, and doesn't lie incessantly, but that's not really a valid belief, because it's factually and consistently demonstrated otherwise.  Just because I "believe" it doesn't make it a correct belief or a belief worthy of respect.

Back to the original contention, it's my understanding as well that total forested ground cover is indeed greater than it has been in the industrialized past.  What I also understand though, is that old-growth forests have been replaced by plantings that are not as conducive to biodiversity, and so the claim that we have more forests now comes with a huge caveat.   That's my *understanding* and it could be wrong; it's not really a "belief" that's valid simply because I really really think it's true.

Dig?

His comment was a put-down. 

 9 
 on: August 22, 2019, 10:08:22 pm 
Started by BernardLanguillier - Last post by James Clark
Whatever. 


Everyone here "believes" what they post.  No reason for you to be condescending to my beliefs.

Surely you see the difference here though?  You may have an understanding that there is more forest now than there was x years ago - you "believe" that to be true, but that's not really an opinion that's unknowable, and it *could* be incorrect.  Simply because you "believe" it makes it neither correct nor valid.

I can "believe" Donald Trump is a racist.  "Racist" is an inherently subjective term, and you and I can point to evidence, debate it, and come to perhaps equally valid conclusions.

On the other hand, I can "believe" that Donald Trump is honest, and doesn't lie incessantly, but that's not really a valid belief, because it's factually and consistently demonstrated otherwise.  Just because I "believe" it doesn't make it a correct belief or a belief worthy of respect.

Back to the original contention, it's my understanding as well that total forested ground cover is indeed greater than it has been in the industrialized past.  What I also understand though, is that old-growth forests have been replaced by plantings that are not as conducive to biodiversity, and so the claim that we have more forests now comes with a huge caveat.   That's my *understanding* and it could be wrong; it's not really a "belief" that's valid simply because I really really think it's true.

Dig?

 10 
 on: August 22, 2019, 09:59:30 pm 
Started by deanwork - Last post by enduser
I've often thought that flatbed might be an improvement over what is common in current printers. With flatbed the media sits flat and static whilst the inks dance across it. No more struggling to load paper, the ink moving in a controlled factory configuration above.

Pages: [1] 2 3 ... 10