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Author Topic: Approached by Art Consulting Firm for using my photos for a corporate project  (Read 4740 times)

AndrewKulin

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I received an e-mail from a gallery owner in the US indicating they would like to consider using some of my photographs for a project with a corporate client (bank HQ).  They asked me to send them the sizes and prices of my images and indicated they are interested in multiple pieces.  They are looking at sizing in the 18x24 to 24x30 ranges.

I have Googled them, the gallery does exist (a real bricks and mortar location is visible on Google Earth street view).

I am of the opinion that this is a long shot but would like to explore it further.  But I have no experience with this and would like advice on how to approach this.  How are these things commonly dealt with?  What would be reasonable pricing to quote?  Am I expected to send them finished physical prints in the required sizes (and thus need to factor in costs of preparing and shipping the products) or would they expect to receive digital files and they print it out at their end (and in which case I'd need to be speific about usage terms and rights).  I am in Canada as well while they are in the US, so what things do I need to consider from that aspect regarding payments, if it even gets that far.

I am a total newb at this so would really appreciate some advice from those who can speak from experience.

Thanks
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Iluvmycam

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Good for you! I looked at your portfolio. Nice clean work! You have to find out the end use to set your price.

Here are questions for book use that commonly come up.


Is it a retail/trade book, educational other?

Who/What company is publishing the book?

How will the image be used including: Size and placement? (1/4 page cover, inside full page inside, etc.),

Shat is the print run?,

Are you using the image for both hardcover and softcover runs?

Where is it being distributed (US, NA, World etc.)


Yes, you supply prints. Photogs seldom give out digital files unless hired by a client to produce those files. But you can do what you like. I provided prints to European client on request. The company never paid me for them. I was out the money. Shipping of $90 too. Just how it goes sometimes. Good luck!
« Last Edit: April 29, 2015, 07:06:11 am by Iluvmycam »
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Ken Bennett

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We provide my photos for corporate display use on a regular basis. The design companies all work with very good printers and framers, so we just provide digital files. I'm always amazed at how great the final images look, even at ridiculously large sizes. Our legal team works out the details on usage rights, etc. (Of course, we are not charging money for this, as we really do see it as a PR move for the university.)

The first thing I would do is have a phone conversation with the potential client, with you calling them at their publicly available phone number, just to make sure it's not one of the common scams aimed at photographers, many of which start out with an email asking to buy prints. (It's probably not, but it's nice to make sure.) In that conversation you can clarify how many photographs they will want, who will do the printing and framing, and what their budget is for photography. (Note that it will be much easier from a logistics standpoint for them to make the prints -- no shipping damage, no customs issues, etc.) Once you have all the particulars, you can figure out pricing -- which will be a broad range for this sort of thing. But corporate HQ buildings will be worth more than, say, hotel rooms. You can try Fotoquote, or pricing images on one of the big stock sites like Getty. Note that they will be paying hundreds of dollars per image for printing and framing, so the value of your work should be quite high.

Good luck and I hope it all works out.
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louoates

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Ken is right about calling them first. I get vague requests for prices for prints often. 95% are scams, trolling for (sample) prints in exchange for bad checks, promises to wire money, etc. My best advice is to spend zero more time on this until you speak to a real person.
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AndrewKulin

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Hi.

I spoke with them yesterday and the conversation went well.  We've agreed on a price and delivery method and now all that remains to be seen is if their client is as enamored with the images as the art consultant is.
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Colorado David

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This probably doesn't apply to your situation but I thought I would share a cautionary tale.  An individual decided that he really liked an image of mine after seeing it published in a magazine.  The magazine credits photographers and stock agency, so he calls the agency that represents some of my work.  They talked back and forth several times about ordering a print.  Nothing happens and eventually the stock agency gets tired of dealing with him so they tell him to call me directly.  After I talked to him a couple of times, it became obvious that he wasn't so interested in buying a print as he was stealing my image.  Be sure to have a signed license agreement before sending anyone an electronic file.

AndrewKulin

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I just received word that the corporate client has approved 4 of my photographs for hanging in their new corporate headquarters.  I have to clarify a few things first, and then prepare an invoice so they issue me with a PO.  And of course they have indicated that they want the lowest resolution image of the bunch, to be printed at the largest size (48x60) which means I will need to uprez it about 5x to get to their specified 300 DPI.  Not sure if that will work or not though perhaps Ken Bennett could comment on that as he indicates he has some experience in that.  I would be providing them digital files relieving me of the effort in printing and framing locally, and shipping from Canada to the US.

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Ken Bennett

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I provide the file at the native resolution and let the printer's RIP do the up-res. If you have concerns about this, ask to talk to the printer directly. I have found that the interpolation software the print shops use is much better than what I can do in Photoshop.

Good luck and I hope everything works out for you.
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petermfiore

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The company never paid me for them. I was out the money. Shipping of $90 too. Just how it goes sometimes. Good luck!

You didn't a secure 50 percent payment up front...you always get a down payment. In my forty years in the Art business i have always asked and received an up front payment from clients. If they balk, I walk...It's no great honor to be praised and not paid.

Peter
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