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Author Topic: Supplying raw files to a client  (Read 20798 times)

paulgrundy

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Supplying raw files to a client
« on: March 13, 2015, 06:26:49 pm »

I am shooting for a large American company this weekend here in London.
I've just received an email asking that as well as the "edited" files I also send the raw files.
I've never supplied raw files to a client before and because of the nature of the job, - interiors with extreme lighting, I will be shooting different exposures for the different elements, I'm not sure what use they will be to them.
Is it common practice in the US to supply raw files?
My worry is that if someone else try's to process a single file they are going to end up with a substandard image
which I will get the blame for.
Also given that I am processing all the shots why would they want the raw files?
Is this just a control thing?
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rethmeier

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Re: Supplying raw files to a client
« Reply #1 on: March 13, 2015, 06:53:24 pm »

Hello Paul,
if I was in your shoes,I would tell your client that you don't work that way.
There would be to many variations in the outcome if you would surrender the RAW's.
You're in charge here,
Cheers,
Willem.
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Willem Rethmeier
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Box Brownie

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Re: Supplying raw files to a client
« Reply #2 on: March 13, 2015, 07:17:05 pm »

My inexperienced view is:-

1) What did the original contract say i.e. have they moved the goal posts?
2) If yes to the above, well IMO such changes cannot be unilateral without a renegotiation of the monies to be paid.
3) Do they mean RAW or just unprocessed TIFFs
4) If they really mean the RAWs that is in effect asking for an assignment of the copyright as they will then possess the "originals".
5) read #1 above and repeat ;)

In the case of #2 and #4 then based on other such posting I have read about such 'demands' depending on the type of imagery and how valuable they are to you as the author the price should be between 4 to 20 times the originally agreed prices.

Are they aware that to achieve the sort of results that they commissioned you to create that you producing blended (HDR?) images that are the result of your expertise & your creative style?

Best of luck coming to grips with what sounds like a "high maintenance" customer!
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rethmeier

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Re: Supplying raw files to a client
« Reply #3 on: March 13, 2015, 08:37:54 pm »

Good points made there Box Brownie!
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Slobodan Blagojevic

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Re: Supplying raw files to a client
« Reply #4 on: March 13, 2015, 08:54:48 pm »

Paul, when I got such a request, they just wanted to see the original files. The thing is, I shoot about 300-400 frames, and deliver 40-50 to them. While most of those are bracketed shots, some might be angles and scenes that I thought are not worth including in the final delivery. The client, after seeing the whole shoot, would typically find 1-2 that they wanted nevertheless. I did however explain that I will not deliver any files as raw, for the same reason you mentioned, and the client agreed with that logic.

elliot_n

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Re: Supplying raw files to a client
« Reply #5 on: March 13, 2015, 11:37:10 pm »


4) If they really mean the RAWs that is in effect asking for an assignment of the copyright as they will then possess the "originals".


Supplying raw files has nothing to do with assigning copyright.
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Colorado David

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Re: Supplying raw files to a client
« Reply #6 on: March 14, 2015, 12:18:53 am »

I do some work for a very large company.  All of the work I do for them is governed by a work-for-hire contract, which assigns them the copyright.  That's fine with me.  They pay my fee and they pay on time.  However, work-for-hire must be spelled out in a written contract.  Raw file delivery has no bearing on copyright assignment.

Box Brownie

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Re: Supplying raw files to a client
« Reply #7 on: March 14, 2015, 06:10:12 am »

Supplying raw files has nothing to do with assigning copyright.

I did say in effect, especially as it is far from clear why they want the RAWs with any terms associated with that request?
« Last Edit: March 14, 2015, 06:14:47 am by Box Brownie »
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MarkM

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Re: Supplying raw files to a client
« Reply #8 on: March 14, 2015, 02:23:37 pm »

I'm not sure what use they will be to them.

They're your client, ask them. You shouldn't be afraid to talk to your clients and ask questions. It doesn't need to be confrontational you just need to help them get the best use from your services.  There may be a legitimate reason why they want raw images: maybe they want them for the same reason you keep them, such as a photo archive that's future-proofed against advances in color and reproduction technology. Or maybe you haven't done enough to establish trust in your digital production and color skills you are worried they will screw up the raw conversion, maybe they have the same concern about you. Or maybe they don't even know what they're asking for; I've had clients ask for raw jpegs before.

The point is you don't know until you ask them. Once you open a dialog and directly ask them what their concern it, you will be in a much better position to help them make the best choice.

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Stanmore

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Re: Supplying raw files to a client
« Reply #9 on: March 20, 2015, 07:16:22 pm »

Paul, the request for raw files happens once in a while in the UK too, and your concern for your reputation in this instance is justified. The thing to ascertain is who will be working on the raw files. There are specialist retouching companies that can match and/or exceed the results you/I can achieve. When I know one of these is on-board I happily fire-off raw files.
Now that said, the average graphic design outfit cannot get close to what you/I can achieve. When I know this is the situ' I simply explain what you have stated here ... That the method/technique used for capture requires specific / personally developed knowledge/experience/judgement when it comes to raw conversion & PS treatment.
Finally, there's the issue to consider of what UK copyright law refers to a 'right to credit' (your name captioned by the image). This is a right usually enforced for editorial work, but relinquished for commercial/advertising. Your reputation is much more likely to be founded on your professionalism, consistency portfolio and Website, rather than some anonymous usage of an overseas entity. On the odd occasions I've been unhappy with the work done by a retouching house, I've simply re-worked myself, and shown those versions on my own marketing media.
« Last Edit: March 20, 2015, 07:22:33 pm by Stanmore »
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Andrew Krucko

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Re: Supplying raw files to a client
« Reply #10 on: April 01, 2015, 12:05:52 am »

What I am worried about is my reputation. If some images are badly processed then it will be my fault and I wont even know it has happened to defend my corner.


You don't want that.  I happened to me...... most annoying!!
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