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Author Topic: Moving to Primes for Landscape Work - Who has done this?  (Read 12095 times)

Jim Pascoe

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Re: Moving to Primes for Landscape Work - Who has done this?
« Reply #40 on: October 28, 2014, 05:03:56 am »

Hi Jim,
I am very interested in capturing landscapes and want to make them a large part of my photography. It was Hans Kruse' magical landscape images that made me consider full-frame.

Hi Nick

Firstly - yes the picture is from Tuscany.  A friend and I were running a photo workshop there ac couple of years ago and are doing the same again in May 2015.  The area is stunning and the picture you see is of a view photographed by thousands before me!  I have a dislike for repeating pictures that have been done to death - often much better than mine - but hey - I was there and could not resist! ;D

I did congratulate Hans earlier in the year when I first saw his pictures - they are truly spectacular.  Possibly a bit too vibrant for me at times - but that is what is great about photography - there is no right or wrong, just what appeals to you personally.  Hans can speak for himself but I would venture to say that most of what you perceive to be the 'magical' qualities of Hans' pictures has little to do with his equipment.  I'm sure Hans could produce similar pictures on Canon, Nikon, M43, APSC or almost any other reasonable quality system.  His pictures are down to his vision and skill and the superb use of light.  That's it.  If you need to make very large prints then you need to be worrying about the finer points of sensor size and lens resolution but really for most uses the gear is not going to make any perceivable difference.

The picture I posted above seas full frame with a 50mm Zeiss lens and I have made a biggish print which is on my wall.  It is incredibly detailed right from the beautiful flowers in the foreground right up to the buildings on the distant hills.  I do not believe my Olympus with a prime lens would be quite as good - but at most normal print sizes it would be fine.  And it all comes down to how big a camera you are happy to cart around.

Last year we went to Venice in November and I took most of my pictures on a Ricoh GR - here is one below. 

I have been a professional for 16 years and am also a keen amateur.  I still could not advise you on the best system because I am always learning and experimenting myself.  My best advice would be that whatever camera or lens you have - use it a lot and learn it inside out.  That will lead to better pictures than any amount of worrying about what camera another photographer uses.

Best wishes

Jim
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BernardLanguillier

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Re: Moving to Primes for Landscape Work - Who has done this?
« Reply #41 on: October 28, 2014, 06:12:45 am »

Great links. Thank you, Bernard. I was curious about the differences between the equivalent lenses from Nikon and Canon. My initial interest in Canon came from reading about how many landscape photographers were using the Metabones Smart Adapter to mount Canon L glass on their A7R bodies.

Nick,

Those are typically Canon users looking for higher res/higher DR body compared to what's availbale in Canon's line up who bought a a7r and continue to use their excellent existing Canon lenses. There are quite a few here at LL.

Few Nikon users do that, not because nobody is doing landacape with Nikon cameras (on the contrary), but because they have those sensors natively available in F mount. The only value of the a7r for landscape compared at a D810 is pretty much weight.

When comparing Nikon vs Canon lenses, the reality is that there are overall very close. With Nikon winning in some focal lenghts and Canon in others, always typically within a few % of each others. Two notable exceptions are the 17mm T/S that only exists in Canon mount and the 14-24 f2.8 only existing in Nikon mount, but both companies have been rumored for months to close these gaps with patents published last year on both sides. Some Nikon lenses are clearly due for a replacement soon, such as the 135mm f2.0 and 300mm f4.0, the same could be said of the Canon 100-400mm zoom lens,...

Then you have lenses that are unique because of their look. The Canon 85mm f1.2 II renders beautifully, but is a bit behind its Nikon equivalent in technical qualities. The Nikon 58mm f1.4 may be the best environmental portraiture lens with a very beautiful bokeh, but isn't as sharp wide open than other lenses,...

When you go beyond the typical over simplifications, you start to realize that either brand will do from a lens standpoint, but that there are some strong/weak points relative to some specific applications.

The fact that you can use Nikon lenses on Canon bodies but not the opposite makes buying Nikon lenses a very sound long term investment regardless of possible changes in sensor performance. Owning Nikon lenses makes you pretty much brand agnostic in terms of body because Nikon lenses can be mounted on pretty much anything.

But at the end of the day, the camera you have the best feel shooting with is probably the right one for hand held photography. When shooting landscape, I tend to think that "feel" is pretty much irrelevant since the camera is most of the time sitting on a tripod anyway.

Cheers,
Bernard
« Last Edit: October 28, 2014, 06:22:02 am by BernardLanguillier »
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Nick Walt

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Re: Moving to Primes for Landscape Work - Who has done this?
« Reply #42 on: October 28, 2014, 12:11:10 pm »

Hi Jim,

I thought I recognised that house on the little hilltop, haha. I wonder if the families that live in that area know how famous their little patch of grass is. What a place to live, hey.

Before I sold the E-M1 I contemplated using HDR to overcome the noise issue that occurs when the sensor is stressed. But in the end I just wanted the significant jump in IQ that a good full-frame sensor and lens combination will give. I just didn't realise how much a step backward a camera with an OVF feels like.

The X-Trans Fuji sensor is a significant step up in IQ from the m43 sensor and the Canon is smoother again, with the new sensor in the D750 even better.

The GR is a very nice camera. I've had a look at it a few times and contemplated getting one instead of a 28mm prime for whichever full-frame I buy.

Thank you, Bernard. I've come to appreciate both Nikon's and Canon's lens lineup. As you say, both have good strengths and some weaknesses in different areas. Nikon's f1.8 lenses are a great value option that are rated to resolve enough for the D810. Canon's trinity of f4 stabilised zooms are a great set, too.

That's a very interesting point you made about using Nikon lenses on Canon bodies. How well do they work? AF is fast? What about stabilisation? Aperture is responsive to the camera?

Cheers,
Nick
« Last Edit: October 28, 2014, 03:16:16 pm by Nick Walt »
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NancyP

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Re: Moving to Primes for Landscape Work - Who has done this?
« Reply #43 on: October 28, 2014, 02:32:21 pm »

When you use Nikon lenses on Canon bodies, the AF does not work because Canon and Nikon electronic protocols are not compatible. Now, I use a number of old Nikkors with manual aperture rings and manual focus (pre-AI, AI, AIS is the nomenclature for the earliest 1960s and early 1970s Nikkors). Metering works when the camera is set at Av (aperture fixed, shutter speed varies) exposure mode. Of course you have to remember to actually set the aperture ring at the stated f/stop. When in manual exposure mode, live view does not brighten up when you stop down, because the camera has no clue that you are stopping down. PITA, but I focus at wide open, then shoot stopped down, then chimp and check focus in the various zones I want sharp. This works fine in low light for landscape or macro on a tripod, though you should expect more battery use due to live view and chimping. EXIF shows "--mm f0.0" if you don't use a "dandelion" chip on your adapter.

I don't know how Nikkor G series lenses work regarding aperture stop-down. I do know that the adapters for G series lenses are different from other Nikkor to EOS adapters, there's an additional lever control that must activate the mechanical linkage inside the lens to stop down the lens.  http://www.16-9.net/nikon_g/

Why bother? Well, I was given some Nikkor lenses by a relative, and I like vintage lenses (all AI/AIS). I haven't yet lost hope in Canon releasing an equivalent to the Nikkor G 14-24mm lens, but if a used one at a good price crossed my path, I would be sorely tempted. Plus, I am an old fart from the all-manual film camera era, and it just seems more natural to me to focus manually if I am not in a hurry.
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synn

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Re: Moving to Primes for Landscape Work - Who has done this?
« Reply #44 on: October 29, 2014, 07:06:21 am »

G adapters have a virtual aperture ring with 0-1-2-3 etc written on it for each click. Canon cameras meter fine with them.

As a rule of thumb, you get nikons for great sensors and canons for great lenses.
Or you could get a sony A7r, a metabones EF adapter with AF, all the canon lenses you need and have the best of everything. Get th G adapter too if you want to use the 14-24.
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JohnBrew

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Re: Moving to Primes for Landscape Work - Who has done this?
« Reply #45 on: October 29, 2014, 07:43:01 am »

The only zooms I ever used were with my D200, back in the day. I've always used primes and for many reasons. As I get older I have mentally toyed around with the idea of possibly trying a zoom, especially for travel, but, imo, there are just too many compromises with them. And it may have something to do with my shooting style being more comfortable with primes and the way they balance on the camera. And my friends would counter with "oh, so that's why you are shooting that honking hulk of an Otus" ;D. Sometimes our reasons don't make sense to others but we are all individualistic in our approach to photography or I would like to think so.

NancyP

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Re: Moving to Primes for Landscape Work - Who has done this?
« Reply #46 on: October 29, 2014, 10:33:42 am »

Hey synn, here's a great use for a Sony A7r, totally tempting if you have 4K to 5K$ sitting around: Nikkor 14-24mm on a tilt-shift adapter fitted to the Sony E mount (A7 series). HCam/ Hartblei just showed it at Photokina. http://www.hartblei.de/en/whatsnew.htm  Some lucky users are working with the betas already.
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synn

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Re: Moving to Primes for Landscape Work - Who has done this?
« Reply #47 on: October 29, 2014, 10:57:39 am »

Yep, I saw that and am very tempted. I will probably replace my nikon bodies with sony some time soon.
something tells me sony will launch an updated version with a newer sensor soon, so no harm in waiting a bit.
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Nick Walt

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Re: Moving to Primes for Landscape Work - Who has done this?
« Reply #48 on: October 29, 2014, 03:33:27 pm »

Thanks, Nancy. Manual focus on the Canon looks quite okay to me. Almost like focus peaking - where the Canon AF points on the 6D glow red when you achieve focus on that location. Much better than the Nikon implementation, I think.
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ErikKaffehr

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Re: Moving to Primes for Landscape Work - Who has done this?
« Reply #49 on: October 29, 2014, 04:22:48 pm »

Hi Synn,

That is my expectation, too.

Best regards
Erik

Yep, I saw that and am very tempted. I will probably replace my nikon bodies with sony some time soon.
something tells me sony will launch an updated version with a newer sensor soon, so no harm in waiting a bit.
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synn

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Re: Moving to Primes for Landscape Work - Who has done this?
« Reply #50 on: October 29, 2014, 05:12:42 pm »

Thanks, Nancy. Manual focus on the Canon looks quite okay to me. Almost like focus peaking - where the Canon AF points on the 6D glow red when you achieve focus on that location. Much better than the Nikon implementation, I think.

Nikon has an electronic rangefinder, that tells you which way to turn the focus ring and then a green dot when focus is achieved.

You obviously have a ton of questions about both systems. Why don't you go to a store and spend 10 minutes on each?
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duane_bolland

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Re: Moving to Primes for Landscape Work - Who has done this?
« Reply #51 on: October 31, 2014, 11:43:37 am »

I was at an Art Wolfe seminar a few years ago and someone asked him why he uses Canon's 16-35mm as opposed to the 17mm and 24mm TSE lens which could deliver better image quality.  He said something to the effect that despite his fame, he struggles with size and weight issues while flying just like everyone else.  He said he uses the 16-35mm because it is smaller, has autofocus, takes filters, is faster to use, and is plenty good enough optically for his needs. 
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