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Author Topic: Request for advice getting started in digital medium format  (Read 25983 times)

torger

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Re: Request for advice getting started in digital medium format
« Reply #20 on: October 15, 2014, 08:54:21 am »

I look into samples for you...

SK35 samples posted in private message. I can't provide SK28 samples as I don't own that lens. As I write in the PM, if you intend to stay with the P45+ for some time those lenses are good, if you can live with the sharpness falloff in shifting (which is a bit larger than what you find in a Rodenstock Digaron-W 32mm). It should still be considerably better than your PC-E 24.

One thing I forgot to mention about these is that due to their symmetric design and f/5.6 wide open they're a bit of a challenge on the ground glass (vignettes a lot). It's possible and I do it but it's not exactly a great experience of user-friendliness. With HPF ring on an Alpa or Cambo or RM3Di that won't be a problem of course as you don't need to look through the lens to focus.
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Wolven

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Re: Request for advice getting started in digital medium format
« Reply #21 on: October 15, 2014, 09:03:18 am »

Hello Erik,

The CFV-50C looks very attractive but I am certainly not looking at that price bracket. I currently feel that a second hand P45+ might be a good compromise at the cost of Live View. I am in no way chasing resolution and I usually buy to keep things for a very long time but I'm certainly looking for a larger sensor size for its unique FOV and now I am convinced that I need a technical camera.

Thanks for the link, I was after personal stories like that. Please give me some time to cover all the articles thoroughly. There is a good deal to take in.

Also, you bring up a good point about Sony. There are currently rumours that they are coming up with a medium format camera in association with Mamiya. It is supposed to "different" to what is in the market right now and also much cheaper. While they seem to be on the bleeding edge of what is possible with today's technology there are notes that their new medium format entry may be a rangerfinder type.

I watch with interest but I hope they go the route of a modular system that involves a detachable digital back that could be mounted on a technical camera! One can dream eh?  ;)

Hi,

My impression is that the most viable MFD option having live view is the new CFV-50C sensor from Hasselblad, the options from Leaf (Credo 50) and Phase One IQ-150/250 are more expensive but may offer better LV.

The Pentax 645Z has all of that at a much lower price and even includes a camera.

It has been suggested to find out your needs and wants. Why do you want an MFD?

- If you want more resolution and DR there will be more options based on full frame 135 pretty soon.
- If you want a larger sensor, the best option may be a second hand CCD sensor, like P45+ or P65+.
- You perhaps need/want a technical camera

Write down on a piece of paper what you want and also what you are willing to pay, than try to find the stuff that matches your needs at a price you can afford.

http://echophoto.dnsalias.net/ekr/index.php/photoarticles/76-my-medium-format-digital-journey
http://echophoto.dnsalias.net/ekr/index.php/photoarticles/77-two-months-of-mfd-looking-back
http://echophoto.dnsalias.net/ekr/index.php/photoarticles/80-my-mfd-journey-summing-up

Actually, I feel it is a time for a fourth instalment, having shot MFD for 16 months. I am quite happy with my MF kit, and it is not probable I am selling it off any soon.

But, right now I am waiting for a decent A series Sony with 46-54MP, a first Electronic First Curtain and a powerful battery and a few Zeiss Loxia lenses.

Best regards
Erik

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Wolven

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Re: Request for advice getting started in digital medium format
« Reply #22 on: October 15, 2014, 09:06:24 am »

Thanks Jerome. I'll reply inline with a different colour.

Be aware that very wide lenses often cause color shifts and vignetting on technical cameras. They can be made to work, but a large part of this forum is devoted to people asking questions on how to make them work...  ::)

While that is funny  :) I do not understand the colour shifts. Pardon my lack of knowledge but do you mean chromatic abberations?

http://www.schneiderkreuznach.com/photo-imaging/produktbereiche/fotoobjektive/produkte/fachkamera-objektive/digitale-objektive/apo-digitar-xl/. This is the manufacturer site (in German).

Be aware that smaller MF sensors usually incorporate micro-lenses and that causes problem with wide angle lenses designed for technical cameras.

Could you please explain this point? I'm lost. Thanks a lot for taking the time

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torger

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Re: Request for advice getting started in digital medium format
« Reply #23 on: October 15, 2014, 09:07:10 am »

but it makes me wonder if 'Stitching' has ever crossed the OP's mind.

Again a good point, and it's true that stitching you can get extremely high quality with modest equipment. One thing that one should surely consider.  It's true that perspective control can be done with stitching and also with post-processing techniques. Tilt can't really be done but in some cases similar results can be had with dual focus distances in a two-row stitch (been there done that).

I did some stitching with my DSLR and still have the fine stitching head, but I found that stitching did not fit my personality well. I get great satisfaction of the one-shot image and making the image as complete as possible in camera, I just enjoy the tech cam image making workflow better. Sometimes the 4:3 format fits the creative vision and also the focal length, so no cropping is required afterwards and those times feels like hole-in-one. I like that feeling. The LCC shot is a mess it's true, but I can live with that.

I sit so much with the computer at work (and at this forum ;) ) so I also like to minimize post-processing needs. With a tech cam I get home with few images which generally does not require that much post-work and I appreciate that.

I'm starting to sound like a salesperson, I know... anyway, the choice of system is at least as much about how you like to work with the system as about image quality.
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torger

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Re: Request for advice getting started in digital medium format
« Reply #24 on: October 15, 2014, 09:12:19 am »

Uh-oh... color cast might come as a bad news to you. You can read under the heading "Dealing with color cast" in my Linhof Techno review.

What it means in practice is that you need to shoot a calibration shot for each shot you make. You can have a library of calibration shots but as movements is not stored in EXIF data it's not very practical.

Color casts is different depending on lens+sensor combination and gets worse when you shift. In really bad cases you get crosstalk (color channel mixing) and you get desaturated color. Picking lens+sensor combination that works according to your expectations is thus very important. For example you can get great results with the SK35 wide angle with an IQ180 digital back, when the lens is centered. But if you shift any substantial amount you will see gross degradation in image quality, while a P45+ works much better with it thanks to a different pixel design.

You will be shooting those calibration shots regardless though....

Here's a good technical explanation of why color cast occurs:
http://www.mamiyaleaf.com/assets/files/documentation/Cast_Effects_in_Wide_Angle_Photography.pdf
« Last Edit: October 15, 2014, 09:18:54 am by torger »
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hexx

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Re: Request for advice getting started in digital medium format
« Reply #25 on: October 15, 2014, 09:19:32 am »

one thing worth mentioning -> with digital back w/o LV and tech camera you need to always dismount digital back (unless you have sliding thingy) and therefore exposing sensor to elements - keep that in mind (that's why, same as you, my budget options were limited, I decided to pair Leaf Aptus 75S with hasselblad V body - yes, no wide options there)
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Wolven

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Re: Request for advice getting started in digital medium format
« Reply #26 on: October 15, 2014, 09:19:43 am »

Thanks for this. I guess its going to be a second hand P45+ that I need to talk to my local dealer about. Are there any significant disadvantages of going for the P25+?

Also the digarons seem quite attractive with an unattractive price tag. Like you suggest, may be starting with the SK28 is the way to go with a future purchase of the digaron. The samples look brilliant and I do not intend to share them.

Now all I need to work out is to narrow down the camera to buy.

Let's see, let me try to answer one question at a time;

How does the focus check on the Leaf Aptus 75 work? You shoot the image, wait until the preview appears on the screen and then tap on the screen (it's an old-school touch screen) where you want to zoom to 100%. If it's sharp you'll see it. Beware it's slow though, takes 4 seconds or so to get into 100%. The Aptus-II should be considerably faster. But if you're not in a hurry significant money can be had with essentially the same image quality if you get the older generation.

As you need long exposure you can forget about that. You need a P45+ or P25+. I think you can get decent time out of the older P45 too but they're not so easy to come by. With the P45+ you can see how the composition became, but you can't really see if it got sharp. You don't really need it even with ground glass focusing, but dropping both live view and 100% sharpness check can be a bit tough. I surely like to have it.

With high precision focusing ring on Alpa or Cambo, or using RM3Di system (which is even higher precision, overkill if you ask me) it's easier to be without 100% sharpness check. With Cambo (which is more economical than Alpa) you buy HPF rings from Alpa and attach them to the Cambo lenses.

I make no secret out that I'm a fan of the Schneider Digitar range and also like the SK28 and SK35 wides. But Rodenstock Digaron wides are sharper when shifted and have less compatibility issues with small pixel sensors. The more sharpness-oriented tech cam users generally use Digarons on the wide end.

The SK28 and 35 should be good for the P45+, but if you want to upgrade to higher resolution after that and still be able to shift a lot with them the only real option is Hasselblad 50 megapixel backs (not the CMOS ones, but the one with the Kodak sensor). On the other hand you could sell the lenses then if you need to change to Digarons.

Personally I think the 48x36 / 49x37mm sensor size is optimal for 90mm image circles, it gives a movement range similar to what you are used to from the PC-E, also makes the SK35 like a 24mm on 135 which is a good field of view to work with I think. The full-frame sensors give a bit less movement range. The 44x33 size gives overkill movement range I think, while still a bit small range on 70mm Digaron-S. But that's just my personal opinion. The 48x36 & 49x37mm sizes will probably disappear, it's only Hasselblad that is using it in current products (the Kodak 50 megapixel sensor). In second hand space it will be relevant for many more years though.

I look into samples for you...
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Wolven

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Re: Request for advice getting started in digital medium format
« Reply #27 on: October 15, 2014, 09:28:57 am »

Hi Bart,

Stitching for panos is something I learnt early and do occasionally with my DSLR. At one stage I did think of getting a RRS pano head with all the bells and whistles but decided against the investment as the thought of medium format was planted in my head.

Cheers.

Hi,

The OP is coming from a smaller than medium format experience. He desires more perspective control and higher resolution capabilities, and a wide angle of view capability.  So there will be a learning curve to get a grasp of perspective control, although the upright trees seem to be a rather simple goal (more is possible, like (de-)emphasizing foreground/edge features).

I'm not trying to spoil the fun of exploring (with) a new type of camera, but it makes me wonder if 'Stitching' has ever crossed the OP's mind. Stitching allows to use the same camera one is already accustomed to (or swap with a different camera, even a MF-sensor based one, but with fewer color cast issues because mostly the center of the image circle is used). It allows to adjust perspective in many more sophisticated ways than a view-camera can, it allows to create huge files, it allows to create a huge field-of-view with much higher quality than with a single WA-lens , it can be done at a fraction of the cost of investing in a new platform. The only thing it cannot do directly, is tilt the focus plane like a tilt lens can (unless one stitches with a T/S lens). There may (although rarely) be issues with capturing moving subject matter.

Just adding some food for thought.

Cheers,
Bart
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Wolven

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Re: Request for advice getting started in digital medium format
« Reply #28 on: October 15, 2014, 09:31:15 am »

Ok thanks for that, I have bookmarked it for further reading. I will be focusing on the P45+ or may be a P25+ and which lenses work well with them.

This is exactly what I was after - knowledge and information to research before taking the plunge.

Cheers.

Uh-oh... color cast might come as a bad news to you. You can read under the heading "Dealing with color cast" in my Linhof Techno review.

What it means in practice is that you need to shoot a calibration shot for each shot you make. You can have a library of calibration shots but as movements is not stored in EXIF data it's not very practical.

Color casts is different depending on lens+sensor combination and gets worse when you shift. In really bad cases you get crosstalk (color channel mixing) and you get desaturated color. Picking lens+sensor combination that works according to your expectations is thus very important. For example you can get great results with the SK35 wide angle with an IQ180 digital back, when the lens is centered. But if you shift any substantial amount you will see gross degradation in image quality, while a P45+ works much better with it thanks to a different pixel design.

You will be shooting those calibration shots regardless though....

Here's a good technical explanation of why color cast occurs:
http://www.mamiyaleaf.com/assets/files/documentation/Cast_Effects_in_Wide_Angle_Photography.pdf
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torger

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Re: Request for advice getting started in digital medium format
« Reply #29 on: October 15, 2014, 09:31:52 am »

Thanks for this. I guess its going to be a second hand P45+ that I need to talk to my local dealer about. Are there any significant disadvantages of going for the P25+?

The P25+ is 22 megapixel, I think it's mainly the lower resolution. I'm not sure how much it differs in long exposure capability, need to look that up.

I've shot a bit with a 22 megapixel back and it's fine. With a 22 megapixel back your base aperture will be f/16 (as f/11 don't really look any sharper), and with the 39 megapixel you'll likely prefer f/11. This means that depth of field may seem less challenging on the 22 megapixel back. All these sensors lack antialias filters, so if you're sensitive to moire and aliasing the 22 megapixel can be a bit of a pain as it does make it considerably more likely to show aliasing effects than the 39 megapixel back.

Worth noting is that the P45+ when it was new was Phase One's flagship model and was for many professionals the breaking point where digital finally was better than 4x5" film. So if you want something with similar quality to 4x5" film in terms of printing big, the P45+ is a better option than the P25+.
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synn

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Re: Request for advice getting started in digital medium format
« Reply #30 on: October 15, 2014, 09:33:26 am »

A Cambo WRS with Schneider lenses and a P25+/P45+ seems like the cheapest entry point for you if you're looking at tech cameras. You may come across a Hasselblad H3D 39 for cheaper, but away from the H-body, the back is more painful to use than a Phase/ Leaf option. Also, upgrade options in the future are more limited.

With a single lens, you're looking at USD 11-14k.

A view camera and lenses would be cheaper, without the precision of a tech camera setup.

...and yes, thanks for the kind words on my pictures.
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Wolven

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Re: Request for advice getting started in digital medium format
« Reply #31 on: October 15, 2014, 09:34:37 am »

Hello Hexx,

I think I will go the route of using a precision focus ring with a laser distance measure (There are good Leica ones for around the $200 mark used) and avoid the need to dismount the back every time.

While budget is certainly a huge overarching concern, I don't want to give in to false economy and buy twice!! Yikes!

Cheers

one thing worth mentioning -> with digital back w/o LV and tech camera you need to always dismount digital back (unless you have sliding thingy) and therefore exposing sensor to elements - keep that in mind (that's why, same as you, my budget options were limited, I decided to pair Leaf Aptus 75S with hasselblad V body - yes, no wide options there)
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torger

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Re: Request for advice getting started in digital medium format
« Reply #32 on: October 15, 2014, 09:37:58 am »

Ok thanks for that, I have bookmarked it for further reading. I will be focusing on the P45+ or may be a P25+ and which lenses work well with them.

The good news is that those backs work good with everything :-).

It's when you get to Dalsa with 6um pixel size and smaller plus the Sony CMOS sensors you need to be more caring when choosing lenses, and you also have some special case in the older backs like the P30+.

All 16, 22, 33 and 39 megapixel backs works fine with everything, and also the CCD-based 50 megapixel backs. If your back has 31, 40, 48, 56, 60 or 80 megapixels or happens to use the new 50 megapixel Sony CMOS you need to be more careful. Why I can say this based on pixel count is that there are quite few sensors used and they are made in certain sizes.
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Bart_van_der_Wolf

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Re: Request for advice getting started in digital medium format
« Reply #33 on: October 15, 2014, 09:39:11 am »

I sit so much with the computer at work (and at this forum ;) ) so I also like to minimize post-processing needs. With a tech cam I get home with few images which generally does not require that much post-work and I appreciate that.

Anders, I hear you ...  However, there's also more opportunity to shoot in the field, not being restricted by one's gear (color cast, heavy lenses, lens not wide enough, or too wide, weather sealing, etc.). The added flexibility to adjust perspective after the fact, in a warmer (or cooler depending on season) and less damp environment, also has its benefits.

Quote
I'm starting to sound like a salesperson, I know... anyway, the choice of system is at least as much about how you like to work with the system as about image quality.

Absolutely. It's good to have choices.

Stitching for panos is something I learnt early and do occasionally with my DSLR. At one stage I did think of getting a RRS pano head with all the bells and whistles but decided against the investment as the thought of medium format was planted in my head.

No problem, just wanted to make sure you were aware.

Cheers,
Bart
« Last Edit: October 15, 2014, 09:44:42 am by BartvanderWolf »
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Wolven

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Re: Request for advice getting started in digital medium format
« Reply #34 on: October 15, 2014, 09:46:13 am »

I will certainly do more homework on these two backs. Although when you put the P45+ back in that light, it does sound way more attractive! Whatever they are paying you in your current job, Phase One should double it and hire you to be on their sales department!! Hahaha...

I'm going retire for the night and have a lot of reading to do ahead of me. Will continue where I left off in the morning. Cheers.

The P25+ is 22 megapixel, I think it's mainly the lower resolution. I'm not sure how much it differs in long exposure capability, need to look that up.

I've shot a bit with a 22 megapixel back and it's fine. With a 22 megapixel back your base aperture will be f/16 (as f/11 don't really look any sharper), and with the 39 megapixel you'll likely prefer f/11. This means that depth of field may seem less challenging on the 22 megapixel back. All these sensors lack antialias filters, so if you're sensitive to moire and aliasing the 22 megapixel can be a bit of a pain as it does make it considerably more likely to show aliasing effects than the 39 megapixel back.

Worth noting is that the P45+ when it was new was Phase One's flagship model and was for many professionals the breaking point where digital finally was better than 4x5" film. So if you want something with similar quality to 4x5" film in terms of printing big, the P45+ is a better option than the P25+.
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Wolven

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Re: Request for advice getting started in digital medium format
« Reply #35 on: October 15, 2014, 09:49:16 am »

Thanks for that. I have not really researched Cambo. I will read up on them as they seem to be for the budget minded. I think I will steer clear of anything with Hasselblad on it. They seem to always carry a relatively hefty price tag with them.

A Cambo WRS with Schneider lenses and a P25+/P45+ seems like the cheapest entry point for you if you're looking at tech cameras. You may come across a Hasselblad H3D 39 for cheaper, but away from the H-body, the back is more painful to use than a Phase/ Leaf option. Also, upgrade options in the future are more limited.

With a single lens, you're looking at USD 11-14k.

A view camera and lenses would be cheaper, without the precision of a tech camera setup.

...and yes, thanks for the kind words on my pictures.
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torger

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Re: Request for advice getting started in digital medium format
« Reply #36 on: October 15, 2014, 09:51:21 am »

One thing to keep in mind with the tech camera route is that you're looking at longer shutter speeds, especially for wides. Not only are you shooting at ISO50 with a small aperture like f/11 or even f/16, you also will be having a center filter. With the SK35 in nice soft landscape light I often have shutter speeds of 1 - 4 seconds. If you're used to shooting large format film this is no strange, but if you come from a small digital format this might feel limiting. In semi-windy weather it can indeed be a bit frustrating, when things seem to be still in 1/4 second but not for 2 seconds which you might need for the shot.
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Ken R

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Re: Request for advice getting started in digital medium format
« Reply #37 on: October 15, 2014, 12:19:36 pm »

Wow, so many replies and info posted!

From reading everything including what the OP has said I would recommend a Arca Swiss RM3Di, a Schneider 35mm Digitar lens (If you can afford a Rodenstock HR-W then that) and a PhaseOne IQ140 or Credo 40 back. (If you can afford a Credo 60 or IQ160 then that)

With the RM3Di you have tilt (or Swing, not both at the same time) with every lens you mount. You also have Back fall/rise and shift (can be combined) with any back.

No need to use adapter / accessories or special tilt/swing lens mounts. Very clean, simple and effective system.

Also the focusing ring is in the body so you can calibrate for infinity for every lens you mount. Just make a few test shots and write down the number. The only issue that the focusing scale on the focusing ring on the body is not in feet or meters it is a generic number scale from 0. With my lenses infinity is generally around 4. Each lens then comes with a distance scale cheat sheet with corresponding numbers. To focus you determine your distance to subject or desired focus point look the matching focus ring number to the distance on the cheat sheet, add your infinity number and then set to the corresponding number (of the sum). Sounds complicated but it isnt. And it is very very precise.

With the PhaseOne IQ backs you can also use focus mask to determine if the image is in perfect focus (and see how focus falls off).

I have used this system for more than a year and the results have been superb.

Keep in mind that with tech lenses and digital backs you need to take an LCC shot (by putting a white translucent plexi 4x4" piece infront of the lens tight and taking a shot) after you make back or lens movements. That part is a pain but you get used to it and no tech camera setup is exempt from it. SLR lenses do not require it though.

Anything less** than the setup I suggested and you might as well use a D810. I would also suggest a D810 instead of a 645Z because the Nikon has a MUCH wider range of lenses available including the tilt shift PC-E lenses. The 645Z has no wide angle tilt shift lenses available. None. Also not all lenses available for the 645z are great. Use a so so lens with the 645z and you might as well be shooting with a lower MP camera. Same thing applies to the Nikon of course but with the Nikon there are EXCELLENT lenses available in the entire focal length range. From extreme wide angle to super tele and everything in between.

With tech cameras focal length availability is limited also but most lenses are much higher quality than SLR lenses and most have large image circles that allow you stitch easily. 

**I am not recommending a PhaseOne P+ back (or Leaf Aptus or Hasselblad back) not because they cant produce high quality results, they sure can! but the crappy lcd screen does not make for a nice untethered shooting experience.
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ErikKaffehr

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Re: Request for advice getting started in digital medium format
« Reply #38 on: October 15, 2014, 02:01:13 pm »

Hi,

A very good posting with lots of info! Thanks a lot!

I would mention the A7/A7r as an alternative to the Nikon, lots of options to use almost any lens. The downside may be that the A7r is a first generation camera with some issues, like the famous shutter vibration.

The other thing, about shooting experience on the P45+ and similar backs, I would say that Ken has a very good point. The P45+ screen is quite OK for histograms and blinkies, but not much else. It is sort of OK for slow and deliberate work, but I guess I share Ken's reservations regarding serious work.

Best regards
Erik



Wow, so many replies and info posted!

From reading everything including what the OP has said I would recommend a Arca Swiss RM3Di, a Schneider 35mm Digitar lens (If you can afford a Rodenstock HR-W then that) and a PhaseOne IQ140 or Credo 40 back. (If you can afford a Credo 60 or IQ160 then that)

With the RM3Di you have tilt (or Swing, not both at the same time) with every lens you mount. You also have Back fall/rise and shift (can be combined) with any back.

No need to use adapter / accessories or special tilt/swing lens mounts. Very clean, simple and effective system.

Also the focusing ring is in the body so you can calibrate for infinity for every lens you mount. Just make a few test shots and write down the number. The only issue that the focusing scale on the focusing ring on the body is not in feet or meters it is a generic number scale from 0. With my lenses infinity is generally around 4. Each lens then comes with a distance scale cheat sheet with corresponding numbers. To focus you determine your distance to subject or desired focus point look the matching focus ring number to the distance on the cheat sheet, add your infinity number and then set to the corresponding number (of the sum). Sounds complicated but it isnt. And it is very very precise.

With the PhaseOne IQ backs you can also use focus mask to determine if the image is in perfect focus (and see how focus falls off).

I have used this system for more than a year and the results have been superb.

Keep in mind that with tech lenses and digital backs you need to take an LCC shot (by putting a white translucent plexi 4x4" piece infront of the lens tight and taking a shot) after you make back or lens movements. That part is a pain but you get used to it and no tech camera setup is exempt from it. SLR lenses do not require it though.

Anything less** than the setup I suggested and you might as well use a D810. I would also suggest a D810 instead of a 645Z because the Nikon has a MUCH wider range of lenses available including the tilt shift PC-E lenses. The 645Z has no wide angle tilt shift lenses available. None. Also not all lenses available for the 645z are great. Use a so so lens with the 645z and you might as well be shooting with a lower MP camera. Same thing applies to the Nikon of course but with the Nikon there are EXCELLENT lenses available in the entire focal length range. From extreme wide angle to super tele and everything in between.

With tech cameras focal length availability is limited also but most lenses are much higher quality than SLR lenses and most have large image circles that allow you stitch easily. 

**I am not recommending a PhaseOne P+ back (or Leaf Aptus or Hasselblad back) not because they cant produce high quality results, they sure can! but the crappy lcd screen does not make for a nice untethered shooting experience.
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Paul2660

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Re: Request for advice getting started in digital medium format
« Reply #39 on: October 15, 2014, 02:02:56 pm »

First and foremost, if you are getting into MF for the first time, find a dealer, and setup a time to shoot with the gear.  MF is much smaller user circle and dealers are critical in the repair and support of the product.  

A few thoughts on the P45+, I owned one and shot it for over 3.5 years

The P45+ is a very old CCD design, it's 39MP and really not much good past iso 200 and in most cases iso 200 is push and pretty noisy.

The P45+ is very very unforgiving with highlights, so you will need to expose to the left to keep your highlights from blowing out, and trust me they will blow 100%

Your shadow recovery on the P45+ is limited, as most times areas in shadow are mushy and not very well detailed.  This is true unless you totally expose for shadows, and of course blow out your highlights, so bracketing is an important consideration for a lot of outdoor shooting

The P45+ will shoot up to 1 hour, however the ambient temp has to be at 69 degrees F or lower, and when it shoots for 1 hour, it has to take a mandatory dark frame exposure immediately afterwards.  In fact all Phase One backs from 1 second out do this, even the IQ250 CMOS.

The LCD on the P45+ is very low resolution and will not offer you much useful feedback in the field in regards to focus checking, as when zooming into 100%, you still can't tell much.  And the time it takes to zoom into 100% is considerable, lots of button pushing and moving the screen around.

There is no USB connectivity for the P45+ only firewire as is true will all P+ backs, so in field tethering has to be done with a full sized laptop.

The P45+ chip is a 1:1 crop, so you won't get a 100% view only 90%, most times not that important but can impact wide angle lenses.

Make sure your P45+ has the latest firmware that Phase One released, and that it's certified to get to 1 hour exposures.  There are possibly still some P45+ backs out there that can't unless Phase One alters their controller card.  I know all about this mine needed this.  

If you use a tech camera, then the P45+ will be a bit more forgiving on shifts as it has no micro lenses and no build in readouts.  The chip appears as one large chip, not a segmented chip, so no tiling will occur.  

If you purchase a P45+, I would purchase it from a dealer and see about a warranty, no P45+ out there should be under any Phase One warranty or Value add, as the Value add's for the P45+ were only 3 years.  If you have to send this back in for repair, trust me, you want to be working with a dealer, not Phase One directly.

If you use your D600 for long exposures, from 1 sec to 1 hour image quality will exceed anything you will get from the P45+.  The P45+ is good and for it's time was amazing, but when it was current, there were no CMOS cameras at 20MP and none CMOS cameras that were out really could come close to the p45+, but that was 6 years ago, almost 7, and CMOS has come a long way.

It's good that you are interested in MF, but I strongly would recommend not spend the 8 or 9K on the P45+, instead, look at the IQ140 or Credo 40.  There have been excellent deals on the IQ140 and Credo 40.  This is the same resolution as the P45+, but a Dalsa chip, which is much more forgiving with highlights, much more.  

Take some time and contact a dealer and see if you can setup a time to stop by and demo some of this gear, as getting your hands on it will help a lot.

Paul
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Paul Caldwell
Little Rock, Arkansas U.S.
www.photosofarkansas.com
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