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Author Topic: Nikon 800mm f/5.6 FL ED VR Review ~ Hummingbirds  (Read 2023 times)

Brian Hirschfeld

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Nikon 800mm f/5.6 FL ED VR Review ~ Hummingbirds
« on: October 11, 2014, 11:46:39 pm »

Hey guys,

fun little article I wrote up that I think you might enjoy. Update on my summer hummingbird project, this year I shot the Nikon 800mm f/5.6 FL ED VR (which was pretty cool) that I rented, anyway hope you enjoy and find my write up of my experience interesting, especially as regards the 1.2x TC which I find very very interesting.

http://brianhirschfeldphotography.com/2014/10/04/nikon-800mm-f5-6e-fl-ed-vr-for-shooting-hummingbirds/

Best,
BH

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capital

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Re: Nikon 800mm f/5.6 FL ED VR Review ~ Hummingbirds
« Reply #1 on: October 12, 2014, 12:41:33 am »

Beautiful photograph there Brian, especially the second one. Now that the Nikon 1 series has a native 70-300, which on the long end is 810mm F/5.6 equivalent, I am curious to to know if Birders will spring for this equipment over the "Big lenses." Certainly cost, weight are firmly in the Nikon 1 camp.
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Brian Hirschfeld

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Re: Nikon 800mm f/5.6 FL ED VR Review ~ Hummingbirds
« Reply #2 on: October 12, 2014, 12:52:05 am »

Funny you mention that, the first year I tried hummingbirds (which is to say last year) when I shot the 400mm f/2.8 AF-S VR, I also rented a Nikon 1 V2 (then top of the line) as well as the adapter to F-mount lenses. I was curious what would happen, I tried it with the 400mm f/2.8, as well as my 70-200 f/2.8 and with both of these it was very very slow, and in no way fast enough for the hummingbirds (the way I was shooting them), maybe now with more experience I might be able to more effectively deploy a system like this (and it certainly has its perks with the sensor crop and high-FPS) but it will still suffer in ISO and resolution (though cropping would be less necessary because of the crop factor inherent in the camera)....

That all being said, to your point, the 70-300mm could be interesting since I imagine its AF is way better then with the F mount lenses and the adapter because its built for the system and they are supposed to focus insanely fast....Could be interesting to try next year just for curiosity (and a reviews ;) ) sake.

Personally, I'm also excited for the Olympus MFT 300mm f/4 and 40-150mm f/2.8 lenses since I rented an OM-D EM-1 once and it was pretty impressive, though not relevant for my applications.....but with the 300mm f4 effectively becoming a handhold able (or monopod for stability) 600mm lens on a fast AF body.....will be interesting to try, hopefully that lens will be out by next summer too....lots of fun little caveats to the project....

..also hoping Canon or Nikon release new 800mm lenses just to try out, maybe someone goes insane and makes something faster then 5.6, a man can dream...

Slight Update: also forgot to mention played with the OM-D EM-1 on a 300mm f/2.8 (four-thirds lens) with the adapter at PDN one year (my thoughts are somewhere on my website) and at the time I deemed it too slow, much like the Nikon 1 V2 and the F-mount lenses, so I never bothered trying to rent it, maybe should again.
« Last Edit: October 12, 2014, 12:56:21 am by Brian Hirschfeld »
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capital

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Re: Nikon 800mm f/5.6 FL ED VR Review ~ Hummingbirds
« Reply #3 on: October 12, 2014, 01:39:22 pm »

Well the options for less expensive bird photography keep getting better. It used to be digiscoping, but now with these crop cameras it seems we're heading in a useful direction. I can understand your frustration about slow AF and also on the poor lens choices for m4/3. The new Olympus m4/3 300 f/4 could be the ticket. Also, Thom Hogan mentioned some brief praise about the native Nikon 1 70-300, and was planning a longer review (oops he just posted it).
« Last Edit: October 12, 2014, 01:41:59 pm by capital »
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