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Author Topic: Sigma Quattro DP2  (Read 9536 times)

Pic One

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Re: Sigma Quattro DP2
« Reply #20 on: September 13, 2014, 09:11:04 am »

In a similar vein, in the past I emailed a request to Sigma to publish a simple codec for Windows, just solely so Windows OS can recognize and display the X3F file types and the embedded jpegs.  Unfortunately the response was "not at this time".   Seems silly that freeware such as Fastone is available that can display hundreds of raw file formats in a separate application;  while eg. Canon and Nikon publish their own codecs to install in windows for their raw files, and Sigma won't be bothered.
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amilewide

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Re: Sigma Quattro DP2
« Reply #21 on: September 13, 2014, 10:26:35 pm »

Hi Pic One,

Yes, focusing on the end-to-end "user experience" is difficult for many companies.  From my own observations, particularly for companies who have remnants of dated manufacturing cultures that existed decades ago.  As a (lens) manufacturing organization, Sigma has this type of a challenge before them - from their web presence, to keeping their blogs actively updated, to something as simple as you mentioned - a X3F file viewer for Win and Mac platforms.  While talented individuals have made such utilities for the Mac, and now Windows, another person has produced an app that allows one to load and view X3F on the iPad (and maybe iPhone) iOS platforms.

It might take a few resources to accomplish these small feats, but this is part of a culture that is focused on what Geoffrey Moore termed "The Whole Product" - one that is thought through in a very complete fashion from the user's perspective.  I think is doing so very positive things, but for reasons beyond my understanding, cultural change is among the most difficult things for leadership teams to enable.  In fact, it always starts at the top - with the leader.

Adobe has changed from a software sales to SaaS model, like it or not, that's where the future revenue streams are, and I commend Adobe, as doing so took an incredible amount of cultural and organizational change.  While many high-end photographers seem a bit put off by SaaS, Adobe had to do it in order to survive, as high-end photographer, counterintuitively, compromise only a smaller portion for their overall revenues.  Wall Street punishes public companies that lack this kind of vision, but Sigma is privately held.

I believe in the potential of the Foveon imager, and Sigma has the opportunity to deliver "The New Medium Format" experience to the masses.  But in order capitalize on this possibility, to shift from the niche exclusivity of serving high-end photographers who are willing to ingest product shortcoming, and over to the early mainstream, IMHO Sigma will have to reorganize, reinvent, and refocus their existing culture around one thing - the user experience.

Just my thoughts, and glad you mentioned the Win codec as an example of their current awareness.  I think they could do much more, as their community of users are fearless techies.  If they could just find a way to open-up a little, publish some SDKs, or get help doing so, I think they could spawn an ecosystem that has the collective ability of their current marketing teams.  Without a community or ecosystem, the challenge to thrive (or even survive) is increased by an order of magnitude.

What other things to you think are missing from Sigma's "Whole Product"?

Scott

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eronald

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Re: Sigma Quattro DP2
« Reply #22 on: September 14, 2014, 09:08:23 am »

I have a DP3M.

It's clear a lot of people are very angry with SPP, but *I* cannot figure out why. For converting a single image at a time it's actually reasonably fast on my 3 year old 17" MBP. I guess one could do Jpegs to have decent fast previews anyway.

Maybe Sigma don't see what's happening either. They have certainly put a lot of effort into making these cameras do interesting things, and are not prepared for the young gen's appetite for instant gratification.

I use Irident to preview files, but if I shot Raw+Jpeg that would be unecessary.

If I want a decent version of my Canon files I also have to fire up their proprietary and slow DPP converter - ACR/LR is nice but its is more of a bureaucrat than a perfectionist - what else is new?

Edmund
« Last Edit: September 14, 2014, 10:37:47 am by eronald »
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amilewide

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Re: Sigma Quattro DP2
« Reply #23 on: September 15, 2014, 12:41:56 am »

Hi Edmund, 

Well made points - the sw that most vendors include with their equipment often has a leg up on Adobe in terms of the RAW file conversion, whether Canon, Nikon or Sigma.  The one thing that LR offers is a consistent interface to a broad set of tools.  Sometime Aperture is preferred over LR, each Platforms seems to offer it's own unique touch to the RAW conversion result, and suppose that's why many serious photographers invest in multiple alternatives.

SPP is fine for many users, but is lacking in basic crop and tilt functions, and though the next generations to come may not care much about things like print output, I do think Sigma would be wise to enable the powerful ecosystem that Adobe represents to both today's serious photographers, and those who will soon replace old very hairs like me, and comprise the potential for capitalization :)

Just received my DPQ2 today.  My first impression - it's a pleasure to handle mounted atop my Manfrotto 327RC joy stick ball head and CF tripod.  The 327 is my compositional and framing interface, and the Qs controls are swift and minimalistic, if not brilliant, the way that I like it.  While I'm on the road with an iPad, and haven't upgraded the firmware, I am very thrilled to have my hands on the camera series that, to me, defines "The New Medium Format" category.   I may end up with the entire trilogy, the LCD viewfinder, and DP Trilogy camera bag.

This makes for a simple, extremely lightweight recording device system, with no field lens changes - just swap out the digital backs.  I liked working with my older DP1 & 2 in this fashion.

But would enjoy it even more if, upon returning, I could toss the workflow over to LR for conversion, editing and asset management.  I suppose in this regard, I'm probably more closely related to the "give it to me now" instant gratification gen, as I don't want to be left behind and miss-out on all of the exciting developments this industry has in store for us.  I'm ready to put my film days behind me, and see what Kazuto-san can really do with this "New APS-C Medium Format" product offering.  Big and clunky will not fly with my 16 & 18 year old sons.  The fact that they have to go outside of iPhoto is already a burden from their perspectives.  And since Adobe is porting CC to iOS, and Apple is introducing new "Photo", these will soon supplant the old world of RAW converters that us grey haired types are accustomed to.  My oldest is deep into the math of Benoit Mandelbrot, and would like to pursue a degree in Mathematics.  Transforming this gen into RAW, with tools that don't "put them out too much" is where I believe the money, and the innovation is likely going.

But I agree, SPP is indeed fine, if nothing more than RAW conversion and global edits are required, sans crop and tilt.

Just an old man's take on the exciting and changing times ahead :)

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eronald

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Re: Sigma Quattro DP2
« Reply #24 on: September 27, 2014, 08:00:08 pm »

The Barnsley book is accessible and may be of interest to your offspring.

http://www.amazon.com/Fractals-Everywhere-Michael-F-Barnsley/dp/0120790610


Edmund

Hi Edmund,  

Well made points - the sw that most vendors include with their equipment often has a leg up on Adobe in terms of the RAW file conversion, whether Canon, Nikon or Sigma.  The one thing that LR offers is a consistent interface to a broad set of tools.  Sometime Aperture is preferred over LR, each Platforms seems to offer it's own unique touch to the RAW conversion result, and suppose that's why many serious photographers invest in multiple alternatives.

SPP is fine for many users, but is lacking in basic crop and tilt functions, and though the next generations to come may not care much about things like print output, I do think Sigma would be wise to enable the powerful ecosystem that Adobe represents to both today's serious photographers, and those who will soon replace old very hairs like me, and comprise the potential for capitalization :)

Just received my DPQ2 today.  My first impression - it's a pleasure to handle mounted atop my Manfrotto 327RC joy stick ball head and CF tripod.  The 327 is my compositional and framing interface, and the Qs controls are swift and minimalistic, if not brilliant, the way that I like it.  While I'm on the road with an iPad, and haven't upgraded the firmware, I am very thrilled to have my hands on the camera series that, to me, defines "The New Medium Format" category.   I may end up with the entire trilogy, the LCD viewfinder, and DP Trilogy camera bag.

This makes for a simple, extremely lightweight recording device system, with no field lens changes - just swap out the digital backs.  I liked working with my older DP1 & 2 in this fashion.

But would enjoy it even more if, upon returning, I could toss the workflow over to LR for conversion, editing and asset management.  I suppose in this regard, I'm probably more closely related to the "give it to me now" instant gratification gen, as I don't want to be left behind and miss-out on all of the exciting developments this industry has in store for us.  I'm ready to put my film days behind me, and see what Kazuto-san can really do with this "New APS-C Medium Format" product offering.  Big and clunky will not fly with my 16 & 18 year old sons.  The fact that they have to go outside of iPhoto is already a burden from their perspectives.  And since Adobe is porting CC to iOS, and Apple is introducing new "Photo", these will soon supplant the old world of RAW converters that us grey haired types are accustomed to.  My oldest is deep into the math of Benoit Mandelbrot, and would like to pursue a degree in Mathematics.  Transforming this gen into RAW, with tools that don't "put them out too much" is where I believe the money, and the innovation is likely going.

But I agree, SPP is indeed fine, if nothing more than RAW conversion and global edits are required, sans crop and tilt.

Just an old man's take on the exciting and changing times ahead :)


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