Pages: 1 ... 3 4 [5]   Go Down

Author Topic: Help me choose my future "pro gear"  (Read 15203 times)

duane_bolland

  • Jr. Member
  • **
  • Offline Offline
  • Posts: 77
    • flexiblelightphotography.com
Re: Help me choose my future "pro gear"
« Reply #80 on: August 27, 2014, 12:18:28 pm »

Here is an interesting discussion about the need (or lack thereof) for "pro gear" to earn money as a pro. 

http://www.fredmiranda.com/forum/topic/1306129

Logged

melchiorpavone

  • Guest
Re: Help me choose my future "pro gear"
« Reply #81 on: August 27, 2014, 12:36:46 pm »

Here is an interesting discussion about the need (or lack thereof) for "pro gear" to earn money as a pro.  

http://www.fredmiranda.com/forum/topic/1306129



Not sure what purpose posting that here serves.

Pros generally use their gear much harder than amateurs, and replace lenses and bodies on a regular basis as they become obsolescent. It's a cost of doing business. (This is definitely a change from the old days, when Speed Graphics and Leica M3s were used by newspaper photographers for decades, and only a small selection of lenses was needed. My parent's wedding was shot on a Speed Graphic. The photos look great, by the way!)

But the Canon or Nikon "pro" lenses are going to be more reliable and less fragile than Tamron or Sigma lenses, and this is what justifies the prices. Again, pros are not the best photographers or the ones with the best equipment (cardiologists and dentists usually have the best stuff).

But if you make the decision to become a "pro", however foolish that decision may be (yes, you too can be homeless, you too can stand by the side of the road with a sign that reads "Will take photographs for food") don't hinder yourself by using off-brand equipment. He didn't:



http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/American_Photojournalist


http://youtu.be/1kqFwVuQ-Hg

This is also worth reading:

http://improvephotography.com/1521/20-tips-for-starting-a-portrait-photography-business/

and this:

http://www.aphotoeditor.com/2011/05/26/sobering-truths-about-making-a-career-out-of-photography/

http://www.smashandpeas.com/10-attributes-professional-photographers-need-to-succeed/

Be prepared to make announcements like this (from a photographer I know who lives in my area, a very good one!):

"I regret to inform you that due to financial reasons, we've had to put the studio up for sale.
It's a wonderful space in the xxx area- large and completely remodeled with a connected living area and studio space. Please talk to xxx for more information or if you'd like to get a hold of his realtor."

and this (from same photographer!):

"I've fallen and I can't get up!!!" Okay, it's not that bad but I did fall from a 10ft ladder while working on my new studio and fractured my pelvis in three places"

« Last Edit: August 27, 2014, 04:05:48 pm by melchiorpavone »
Logged

NancyP

  • Sr. Member
  • ****
  • Offline Offline
  • Posts: 2513
Re: Help me choose my future "pro gear"
« Reply #82 on: August 27, 2014, 06:58:40 pm »

It strikes me that the major difference between an average pro kit and amateur kit is the amount and quality of lighting apparatus. Most amateurs, including myself, are not too sophisticated about using flash and flash modifiers. Amateurs accept the light at the location, pros lug the extra gear on location shoots to add some fill here and highlight there.
Logged

BernardLanguillier

  • Sr. Member
  • ****
  • Offline Offline
  • Posts: 13983
    • http://www.flickr.com/photos/bernardlanguillier/sets/
Re: Help me choose my future "pro gear"
« Reply #83 on: August 27, 2014, 08:17:38 pm »

It strikes me that the major difference between an average pro kit and amateur kit is the amount and quality of lighting apparatus. Most amateurs, including myself, are not too sophisticated about using flash and flash modifiers. Amateurs accept the light at the location, pros lug the extra gear on location shoots to add some fill here and highlight there.

Very true. Good on camera flashes can manage quite a few situations, but many amateurs don't do this with real strobes because they either don't understand the value/need or they just don't have an easy mean to manage the associated logistics.

I feel that the Profoto B1 is truly revolutionary because it has the potential to change all that... to a certain extent. I have just added one to my 3 D1s and it seems to be a great piece of kit!

Cheers,
Bernard

melchiorpavone

  • Guest
Re: Help me choose my future "pro gear"
« Reply #84 on: August 27, 2014, 08:37:52 pm »

It strikes me that the major difference between an average pro kit and amateur kit is the amount and quality of lighting apparatus. Most amateurs, including myself, are not too sophisticated about using flash and flash modifiers. Amateurs accept the light at the location, pros lug the extra gear on location shoots to add some fill here and highlight there.

Yes, that is quite true! The lighting is not always very interesting, though.
« Last Edit: August 27, 2014, 08:52:55 pm by melchiorpavone »
Logged

duane_bolland

  • Jr. Member
  • **
  • Offline Offline
  • Posts: 77
    • flexiblelightphotography.com
Re: Help me choose my future "pro gear"
« Reply #85 on: August 28, 2014, 01:45:19 am »

It strikes me that the major difference between an average pro kit and amateur kit is the amount and quality of lighting apparatus. Most amateurs, including myself, are not too sophisticated about using flash and flash modifiers. Amateurs accept the light at the location, pros lug the extra gear on location shoots to add some fill here and highlight there.

I totally agree, except in the case of editorial portraits in magazines such as Business Week.  Really harsh lighting seems to be all the rage.  It seems like pro photography has gotten so boring and consistent (for a lack of better words), that technically sh!tty photography has become the edgy alternative.  The only magazine I get is Business Week, so I don't know if this a industry pervasive theme.  Maybe Business Week is just really cheap when contracting photographers. 
Logged

melchiorpavone

  • Guest
Re: Help me choose my future "pro gear"
« Reply #86 on: August 28, 2014, 09:59:33 am »

I totally agree, except in the case of editorial portraits in magazines such as Business Week.  Really harsh lighting seems to be all the rage.  It seems like pro photography has gotten so boring and consistent (for a lack of better words), that technically sh!tty photography has become the edgy alternative.  The only magazine I get is Business Week, so I don't know if this a industry pervasive theme.  Maybe Business Week is just really cheap when contracting photographers. 

I see a lot of very flat lighting.
Logged

melchiorpavone

  • Guest
Re: Help me choose my future "pro gear"
« Reply #87 on: August 28, 2014, 12:15:58 pm »

Hello everyone,


I am an "semi-pro" photographer trying to get into the professional scene. I am open to suggestions.


Don't forget:
1. Scruffy clothes for begging on the street-corner
2. Lawyer fees for when your wife wants a divorce and wants to take the kids, because you are working day and night for clients, then waiting months to get paid.

On the other hand, it will give you a good chance to get a lot of those bridge pictures you never got around to, since you will be living under one.




« Last Edit: August 28, 2014, 12:38:59 pm by melchiorpavone »
Logged
Pages: 1 ... 3 4 [5]   Go Up