Pages: 1 [2]   Go Down

Author Topic: Selling Landscapes  (Read 12468 times)

bretedge

  • Sr. Member
  • ****
  • Offline Offline
  • Posts: 310
    • Bret Edge Photography
Re: Selling Landscapes
« Reply #20 on: September 27, 2014, 07:18:23 pm »

Hi Bret,
I see from your blog that you use a Canon 5DIII. Is there a reason that you are not using medium format digital?
Mike

Yes. Quite simply, I can't afford it.

Mike Sellers

  • Sr. Member
  • ****
  • Offline Offline
  • Posts: 666
    • Mike Sellers Photography
Re: Selling Landscapes
« Reply #21 on: September 28, 2014, 07:42:10 am »

What medium format would you go with if you were to switch? Do you use the Canon tilt shift lenses a lot? I don`t think there is a medium format lineup with the same range of T/S lenses?
Mike
Logged

bretedge

  • Sr. Member
  • ****
  • Offline Offline
  • Posts: 310
    • Bret Edge Photography
Re: Selling Landscapes
« Reply #22 on: September 28, 2014, 11:04:25 am »

What medium format would you go with if you were to switch? Do you use the Canon tilt shift lenses a lot? I don`t think there is a medium format lineup with the same range of T/S lenses?
Mike

I would use the Pentax 645Z. I know several people who have been using the 645D and I've seen very large prints they've made from those files.  They're gorgeous. Just gorgeous. And so rich with detail it's astounding.  I've worked with quite a few photographers at my workshops who use Phase One, Hasselblad and some of the other medium format digital cameras and I'm not impressed.  Sure, the image quality is very high but the whole interface is clunky.  Pentax nailed it.  The digital 645's UI is slick and the camera just feels good in hand.  Well balanced, fully integrated system that has been nicely engineered.  Of course, I'm opening myself up to all the fans of the other systems but the bottom line is, Pentax is what would work for ME and that's all that matters to ME.

Also, realistically, I'd have two systems: a Sony a6000 for adventure photography and the Pentax for landscapes.  I need super fast auto-focus and frame rates for mountain biking and trail running, both of which are traits not associated with any medium format digital.

I don't currently use any Canon t/s lenses although I'm budgeting to pick up the 17mm model next year.  
« Last Edit: September 28, 2014, 11:19:49 am by bretedge »
Logged

trevarthan

  • Full Member
  • ***
  • Offline Offline
  • Posts: 136
Re: Selling Landscapes
« Reply #23 on: September 28, 2014, 11:10:19 am »

I would use the Pentax 645Z. I know several people who have been using the 645D and I've seen very large prints they've made from those files.  They're gorgeous. Just gorgeous. And so rich with detail it's astounding.  I've worked with quite a few photographers at my workshops who use Phase One, Hasselblad and some of the other medium format digital cameras and I'm not impressed.  Sure, the image quality is very high but the whole interface is clunky.  Pentax nailed it.  The digital 645's UI is slick and the camera just feels good in hand.  Well balanced, fully integrated system that has been nicely engineered.  Of course, I'm opening myself up to all the fans of the other systems but the bottom line is, Pentax is what would work for ME and that's all that matters to ME.

Also, realistically, I'd have two systems: a Sony a7 for all adventure photography I do and the Pentax for landscapes.  I need super fast auto-focus and frame rates for mountain biking and trail running, both of which are traits not associated with any medium format digital.

I don't currently use any Canon t/s lenses although I'm budgeting to pick up the 17mm model next year. 

How big of prints are we talking about here that would need medium format? And how often do you sell a print that size? I just printed out one of my d810 focus stacked photos 60x40" on canvas just to get a feel for how large I can go. I don't think I've hit the wall yet at that size. It looks like I can go larger. But frankly, I'm not sure if anyone will ever buy anything that large. I paid $430 for the print. I have no idea how much I'd charge to sell it, but at least 2x that amount. Someone would need deep pockets indeed and have to really love that photo to order it that big.
Logged

bretedge

  • Sr. Member
  • ****
  • Offline Offline
  • Posts: 310
    • Bret Edge Photography
Re: Selling Landscapes
« Reply #24 on: September 28, 2014, 11:19:15 am »

How big of prints are we talking about here that would need medium format? And how often do you sell a print that size? I just printed out one of my d810 focus stacked photos 60x40" on canvas just to get a feel for how large I can go. I don't think I've hit the wall yet at that size. It looks like I can go larger. But frankly, I'm not sure if anyone will ever buy anything that large. I paid $430 for the print. I have no idea how much I'd charge to sell it, but at least 2x that amount. Someone would need deep pockets indeed and have to really love that photo to order it that big.

The largest size I offer now is 32" x 48" and we sell more of that size than any other.  I've made a handful of 40" x 60" prints which is definitely the limit for files from the 5DII and even then, you've got to start with a dead perfect image file.  I've had requests for larger, primarily for commercial spaces.  I've seen 40" x 60" D800 prints and when compared to those from the 645D, there is a discernible difference in quality.  The D800 and D810 are certainly exceptional cameras but the larger sensor of medium format definitely records more information and detail, and the resultant prints are just better.  

I'm in no way bashing the D800 or D810.  They're damn fine cameras and they produce crazy good prints.

With regard to who buys prints at that size, there are really two types of clients: those who need huge prints for commercial spaces and those who are affluent and have big houses with big walls.  Both are very good clients. :-)
« Last Edit: September 28, 2014, 11:22:09 am by bretedge »
Logged

trevarthan

  • Full Member
  • ***
  • Offline Offline
  • Posts: 136
Re: Selling Landscapes
« Reply #25 on: September 28, 2014, 11:33:05 am »

The largest size I offer now is 32" x 48" and we sell more of that size than any other.  I've made a handful of 40" x 60" prints which is definitely the limit for files from the 5DII and even then, you've got to start with a dead perfect image file.  I've had requests for larger, primarily for commercial spaces.  I've seen 40" x 60" D800 prints and when compared to those from the 645D, there is a discernible difference in quality.  The D800 and D810 are certainly exceptional cameras but the larger sensor of medium format definitely records more information and detail, and the resultant prints are just better.  

I'm in no way bashing the D800 or D810.  They're damn fine cameras and they produce crazy good prints.

With regard to who buys prints at that size, there are really two types of clients: those who need huge prints for commercial spaces and those who are affluent and have big houses with big walls.  Both are very good clients. :-)

That makes sense. I completely forgot about commercial spaces. I guess those are normally framed prints too, which lowers cost a bit (if you ignore the frame price).

I'd like to see a 645D print at 60x40" for comparison. That would be something. I've found my lens choice makes a huge difference on the d810. Photos taken with zooms are visibly lower quality than the fast primes. My understanding is that medium format lenses tend to blow away 35mm lenses, but I've just never had an opportunity to compare first hand.
Logged

Slobodan Blagojevic

  • Sr. Member
  • ****
  • Offline Offline
  • Posts: 16908
  • When everyone thinks the same, nobody thinks
    • My website
Re: Selling Landscapes
« Reply #26 on: September 28, 2014, 11:49:16 am »

How big of prints are we talking about here that would need medium format? And how often do you sell a print that size? I just printed out one of my d810 focus stacked photos 60x40" on canvas just to get a feel for how large I can go. I don't think I've hit the wall yet at that size. It looks like I can go larger...

Canvas tolerates rather well 100 ppi, so you can go up to 50"x75" without interpolation. With a proper interpolation, you can easily go 2-3x that on canvas.

Mike Sellers

  • Sr. Member
  • ****
  • Offline Offline
  • Posts: 666
    • Mike Sellers Photography
Re: Selling Landscapes
« Reply #27 on: September 28, 2014, 03:00:27 pm »

I like what I have read about the Pentax 645 but my first choice is the Leica S2. The price for a used one is coming down to the $8,000 level so it would be tough to choose between the two for me.
Mike
Logged

Iluvmycam

  • Sr. Member
  • ****
  • Offline Offline
  • Posts: 533
Re: Selling Landscapes
« Reply #28 on: September 28, 2014, 03:56:05 pm »

I assume some of you must be making money shooting landscapes. Indeed, some of you may do it full time for a living. The general opinion seems to be that making money shooting landscapes is too hard or impossible today, due to market saturation.

How do you do it? Where do you sell your work? Do you see it as sustainable?

I can't say about landscapes. But let me tell you about my field....social documentary photography.

One of my latest artists' books was on cutters that practice self harm / self mutilation. It is the ONLY photo book of its kind in the world as far as I can tell. (Nothing under its genre on WorldCat or anywhere I can find.) I had printed it as a limited edition of 30 hand printed books as bound archival pigment prints and offered it as a free donation to special collection libraries and museums. The books are spiral bound with artisan made marbled end sheets and frosted clear plastic covers. I don't want to put a photo of the book here, but the book in question is similar to this one.

http://twentysixroadkills.tumblr.com/

The rejection rate was 85% to 90% for placements of a free donation of the self mutilation book. When all is said and done I had spent about $3500 on this public service donation project. I was able to place 29 out of 30 copies of the book. I'm not some newcomer either. My work is in close to 100 museums and public collections around the world. I am also a leader in hand printed photo book art. Now with other less controversial topics the rejection rate may only be 60% - 70%. But sometimes the rejection rate is 95% for a donation. Anyway you slice it, the going is tough.
 
My philosophy is 'don't shit where you eat.' I do something else for $ and do photography for love of freezing time. if you want $ I'd suggest you do something else. There are lots easier ways to make $. Then again you have the likes of Cindy Sherman and Eggleston that can get millions for garbage. So don't let me burst your dream photo bubble. You give it a try. Either you can or can't. Maybe you do much better work than Sherman and Eggleston combined and can get 10 million a print! With my line of photography I am happy if I can place my work as donations to large institutions.
« Last Edit: September 28, 2014, 04:07:23 pm by iluvmycam »
Logged

bill proud

  • Jr. Member
  • **
  • Offline Offline
  • Posts: 58
    • http://www.billproudphotography.com
Re: Selling Landscapes
« Reply #29 on: September 30, 2014, 01:09:21 pm »

Hi Mike,

I've been selling prints for years and have wanted to open my own gallery but there never seems to be the right situation. It needs to have great lighting, needs to be cheap to rent and have high volume. Full markup is 400%, then you can discount if you want.

Since I live in a small town, I'm near Cortez, Co. the volume is a little low and places to rent are old, and over priced.

I sell 24x30's mainly framed and matted, do my own framing but can't sell them for $195. I use Tru-Vue non-glare glass and Larsen-Jule frames selling for $750.00

I hang in a restaurant in Cortez, not great but big enough to show 30 pieces, which I rotate out throughout the year.

I've gone to canvas which I can sell for about half the framed ones and don't have to worry about glass problems but do have to worry about wafting grease. I do have to clean glass occasionally, which worries me about the canvas being somewhat unprotected.

Doing shows can be a big secondary revenue generator but you have to want to travel with all the necessary equipment. Big truck or van and trailer, tent, tables etc. I figured I'd need a double 10x10 space to show larger pieces. Then you need to print more sizes to have multiple price points.

And then I'd be divorced cause my wife doesn't think that is a life style she wants.

It's a tough nut to crack. Good luck.

Gulag

  • Sr. Member
  • ****
  • Offline Offline
  • Posts: 336
Re: Selling Landscapes
« Reply #30 on: October 01, 2014, 07:06:13 pm »

... Then again you have the likes of Cindy Sherman and Eggleston that can get millions for garbage.  

It shows the lack of understanding of photography as an art form, clearly.
Logged
"Photography is our exorcism. Primitive society had its masks, bourgeois society its mirrors. We have our images."

Jean Baudrillard

trevarthan

  • Full Member
  • ***
  • Offline Offline
  • Posts: 136
Re: Selling Landscapes
« Reply #31 on: October 01, 2014, 07:24:22 pm »

It shows the lack of understanding of photography as an art form, clearly.

Or just lack an understanding of photography as a business. Millions = well done, in my book.
Logged
Pages: 1 [2]   Go Up