Pages: [1]   Go Down

Author Topic: Converting camera to IR then blocking it with a filter?  (Read 2848 times)

StoneNYC

  • Jr. Member
  • **
  • Offline Offline
  • Posts: 56
  • StoneNYC
    • Stone NYC Photography
Converting camera to IR then blocking it with a filter?
« on: March 20, 2014, 02:32:20 am »

Hello everyone, I'm relatively new to this website, however I'm not new to photography or forums, you can find me on a few out there.

Anyway, I mostly a film shooter, and I had a digital question.  I have a 5DmkII that doesn't get much use these days, however I was thinking since the demise of some good IR film, that I might can have it converted for infrared.

But then of course it wouldn't be usable for normal photography. It's kind of an expensive camera but I don't really use it that much, however I would in theory like to have the availability of shooting with it again if I should find a client that requires it.  While looking for the proper infrared filter back when I started shooting infrared film, I also noticed that they had a few different kinds including infrared pass filter versus an infrared blocking filter.

But I'm not really familiar enough with wavelength numbers to fully understand everything that goes on with the light spectrum, but I'm asking in theory if I were to have the sensor converted so that it could except infrared light and take infrared pictures, would I be able to pick up a filter that I could put at the end of the lens that would undo basically what I did to the sensor in order to shoot normal Photography again?

If this is possible, should I be aware of any issues that I might encounter using such a filter

Thanks so much for any help/info.

~Stone
Logged
~Stone | "...of course, that's just my opinion. I could be wrong." ~Dennis Miller

PhotoEcosse

  • Sr. Member
  • ****
  • Offline Offline
  • Posts: 712
Re: Converting camera to IR then blocking it with a filter?
« Reply #1 on: March 20, 2014, 06:01:03 am »

It depends very much upon what type of IR conversion you do in the first place.

If you simply replace the normal sensor filter with, say, a 720nm filter, then that will exclude most of the visible spectrum light and allow IR to pass. There is no way of "reversing" this with a filter in front of the lens.

On the other hand, if you go for what is sometimes called a "high colour" conversion - which allows visible spectrum plus IR light to reach the sensor, then you would have scope for further adjustment in front of the lens.

If you are thinking of doing the "surgery" yourself, it is probably best to seek advice on one of the specific IR forums. If, on the other hand, you are intending to use a specialist firm to do it for you, then speak to them about all the options (there are many).

Maybe dabble in IR first by purchasing a cheap converted compact (Canon A810 is a popular model) for under £100 on eBay and play with that for a few weeks before risking your expensive dSLR.
Logged
************************************
"Reality is an illusion caused by lack of alcohol."
Alternatively, "Life begins at the far end of your comfort zone."

StoneNYC

  • Jr. Member
  • **
  • Offline Offline
  • Posts: 56
  • StoneNYC
    • Stone NYC Photography
Re: Converting camera to IR then blocking it with a filter?
« Reply #2 on: March 20, 2014, 06:13:36 am »

It depends very much upon what type of IR conversion you do in the first place.

If you simply replace the normal sensor filter with, say, a 720nm filter, then that will exclude most of the visible spectrum light and allow IR to pass. There is no way of "reversing" this with a filter in front of the lens.

On the other hand, if you go for what is sometimes called a "high colour" conversion - which allows visible spectrum plus IR light to reach the sensor, then you would have scope for further adjustment in front of the lens.

If you are thinking of doing the "surgery" yourself, it is probably best to seek advice on one of the specific IR forums. If, on the other hand, you are intending to use a specialist firm to do it for you, then speak to them about all the options (there are many).

Maybe dabble in IR first by purchasing a cheap converted compact (Canon A810 is a popular model) for under £100 on eBay and play with that for a few weeks before risking your expensive dSLR.

Thanks,

I would most likely send it to canon to have them convert it for me.

However I'm not sure I'm following you entirely.

If I had the IR blocking layer removed from the camera, then that just mans the IR can reach the film (just like how IR film can be exposed as normal film simply by NOT using a filter) and then just put a normal IR filter on the lens if I want the IR effect.

Is that the "high color" you mean?
Logged
~Stone | "...of course, that's just my opinion. I could be wrong." ~Dennis Miller

jjj

  • Sr. Member
  • ****
  • Offline Offline
  • Posts: 4726
    • http://www.futtfuttfuttphotography.com
Re: Converting camera to IR then blocking it with a filter?
« Reply #3 on: March 20, 2014, 06:38:22 am »

This post may be of interest as it is someone selling a 5D camera converted like you suggest.
Logged
Tradition is the Backbone of the Spinele

StoneNYC

  • Jr. Member
  • **
  • Offline Offline
  • Posts: 56
  • StoneNYC
    • Stone NYC Photography
Re: Converting camera to IR then blocking it with a filter?
« Reply #4 on: March 20, 2014, 06:48:24 am »

This post may be of interest as it is someone selling a 5D camera converted like you suggest.

Thanks, the original 5D doesn't have a dust reduction sensor cleaning so I wouldn't go for that, besides I already own the camera I'm considering I'm converting. But thank you for the thoughtful link.
Logged
~Stone | "...of course, that's just my opinion. I could be wrong." ~Dennis Miller

jjj

  • Sr. Member
  • ****
  • Offline Offline
  • Posts: 4726
    • http://www.futtfuttfuttphotography.com
Re: Converting camera to IR then blocking it with a filter?
« Reply #5 on: March 20, 2014, 07:02:25 am »

It was more some extra info than to buy.
Logged
Tradition is the Backbone of the Spinele

matoqui

  • Newbie
  • *
  • Offline Offline
  • Posts: 40
    • M. Toledo Photography
Re: Converting camera to IR then blocking it with a filter?
« Reply #6 on: March 20, 2014, 07:03:08 am »

The sales post have some useful information about the conversion you want, and the name of a company that can do it for you.

Robert DeCandido PhD

  • Sr. Member
  • ****
  • Offline Offline
  • Posts: 271
    • http://www.BirdingBob.com
Re: Converting camera to IR then blocking it with a filter?
« Reply #7 on: March 20, 2014, 09:03:49 am »

when they do a UV/IR conversion of the camera, the dust removal option is removed - you can no longer automatically (via the camera) remove the dust from the sensor...that being said, I have not found this to be a problem.

if both the IR and UV filters are removed - and you need to use filters on the lens of your camera (to get the appropriate light...be it only UV; or only IR; or "natural" = full spectrum), you will have to use a tripod to shoot with...at least in IR and UV...that is why I don't recommend converting a camera this way. Get your 5D converted to either a full IR camera or a full UV camera - then you can hand hold and shoot...

MaxMax does fine conversions.
Logged

t6b9p

  • Jr. Member
  • **
  • Offline Offline
  • Posts: 70
    • BeyondVisible
Re: Converting camera to IR then blocking it with a filter?
« Reply #8 on: March 20, 2014, 11:15:55 am »

The only way to use a converted DSLR for "regular" visible photography is to get a full spectrum conversion. This type of conversion allows UV, Visible and IR to reach the sensor. Through the appropriate filters, you select the wavelength range of interest i.e.. UV, Visible or IR.

However, in order to use it for "regular" visible photography requires a lens mounted UVIR blocking filter. The problem is obtaining one that mimics the original Canon internal filters that were removed. Unless the match is perfect (unlikely) then the resulting image may be close but have some slight colour cast. In some cases this can be removed through appropriate WB and camera calibration etc but the result is often not completely satisfactory. Maybe OK for your needs but not your client.

I also agree with Robert, get a proper IR conversion as they are much easier to work with and are also less likely to result in hotspots. My suggestion, pick up a second body and get an IR conversion.
Logged
Pages: [1]   Go Up