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Author Topic: Fuji X-T1 review  (Read 35460 times)

Alan Smallbone

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Re: Fuji X-T1 review
« Reply #20 on: February 20, 2014, 11:53:10 am »

Harsh indeed many folks use flash outside of news and weddings and can light properly too.  :P

And high speed flash sync which isn't possible with "proper' lighting is incredibly useful and is something I use all the time. Essential for photographing dancers if you want to keep them sharp for exampl and is also great for being able to use shallow depth of field without faffing around with NDs. Which also make critical focusing rather tricky, so HSS is very handy for creatively lit portraits outdoors.
Not to mention being able to easily add a little bit of pop with fill flash without compromising other settings.



+1  I use my speedlights often.

Alan
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Alan Smallbone
Orange County, CA

Pelao

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Re: Fuji X-T1 review
« Reply #21 on: February 20, 2014, 01:16:06 pm »

Quote
In other areas it looks like a nice enough camera even though I tire a bit of the retro theme.

It's not a theme. It's a way of controlling the operation of the camera that combines digital and analogue controls. It may not be good for everyone. I prefer it. Being able to see critical settings at a glance without peering at a screen, and being able to change them through direct physical controls is an intuitive and tactile pleasure. For sure there are some cameras out there with a shape that points to older cameras, but retaining a digital-first interface, but that doesn't include the leading Fuji X cameras.
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jjj

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Re: Fuji X-T1 review
« Reply #22 on: February 20, 2014, 03:05:20 pm »

It's not a theme. It's a way of controlling the operation of the camera that combines digital and analogue controls. It may not be good for everyone. I prefer it. Being able to see critical settings at a glance without peering at a screen, and being able to change them through direct physical controls is an intuitive and tactile pleasure.
Funny I can see all the setting on my 5Ds just by glancing at one location on top of camera, not 4 separate dials as on the Fuji. Plus I can also easily change them through direct physical controls too.  The shutter dial on the Fuji is a fashionable gimmick that is awkward and clunky to use and lets the camera down ergonomically. It wasn't even a good design in ye olde days and it's simply a stylistic retro gimmick, a shame really as there's lots of things I like about it. Not that some people won't be suckered in by it.
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Pelao

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Re: Fuji X-T1 review
« Reply #23 on: February 20, 2014, 08:03:02 pm »

Funny I can see all the setting on my 5Ds just by glancing at one location on top of camera, not 4 separate dials as on the Fuji. Plus I can also easily change them through direct physical controls too.  The shutter dial on the Fuji is a fashionable gimmick that is awkward and clunky to use and lets the camera down ergonomically. It wasn't even a good design in ye olde days and it's simply a stylistic retro gimmick, a shame really as there's lots of things I like about it. Not that some people won't be suckered in by it.

I never knew being a sucker could be so fun and so useful. I'm loving it.
 ;D
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Wayne Fox

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Re: Fuji X-T1 review
« Reply #24 on: February 20, 2014, 11:36:41 pm »

It's not a theme. It's a way of controlling the operation of the camera that combines digital and analogue controls.
I think retro look and ergonomics are independent of each other. The retro look is a design decision, common in many products.  While the retro look by default will end up with sort of old school ergonomics (not a bad thing), it certainly can be accomplished with a more modern look.  The retro look rarely offends and does appeal to many so can't blame camera makers using it.

Certainly better than the opposite, such as the hasselblad Lunar which wraps an artificial "design" around someone else's camera.

Being an old dude, I sort of like the retro look cameras, other than they seem so "small" that in person sort of look like toys.  But bottom line it is about the ergonomics and functionality and what one person likes another may dislike.
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ndevlin

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Re: Fuji X-T1 review
« Reply #25 on: February 21, 2014, 08:09:08 am »


Jeremy,

Great work on your site. I particularly like your portrait section. As far as high speed. Flash is concerned, this is where I particularly prefer the external strobes. The einsteins are as good as the profotos for high speed capture. The problem obviously is getting a fast enough shutter speed. A lot of guys really like the X100/s for it's leaf shutter for this reason.

I'd actually like to have the time to do some testing of the compact system cameras in that kind of context - real world location portraits and so on. A tripod in the woods is nice but not always the most telling about usability for working pros.

As for the control layout/style, I hear what you're saying about the modern gear, but for many there's a  real pleasure in the traditional analog controls. I'm kind of on that side of the fence thought I appreciate really good modern design as we'll. I'd be excited to try a really forward thinking 'next' type of camera. But there's no taking those risks (bc of the $$ involved, sadly). On the other end, the return to a retro style is good too. Fuji has gotten a Lot right about that.

Cheers,

- N.
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Nick Devlin   @onelittlecamera        ww

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Re: Fuji X-T1 review
« Reply #26 on: February 21, 2014, 08:10:27 am »

I think retro look and ergonomics are independent of each other. The retro look is a design decision, common in many products.  While the retro look by default will end up with sort of old school ergonomics (not a bad thing), it certainly can be accomplished with a more modern look.  The retro look rarely offends and does appeal to many so can't blame camera makers using it.

Certainly better than the opposite, such as the hasselblad Lunar which wraps an artificial "design" around someone else's camera.

Being an old dude, I sort of like the retro look cameras, other than they seem so "small" that in person sort of look like toys.  But bottom line it is about the ergonomics and functionality and what one person likes another may dislike.

I pretty much agree, though I would emphasize that the context of my comments was in relation to the Fujifilm stable. In this case I don't think what is labelled retro separates look and ergonomics - it is an integrated whole. And yes, it's not for everyone:

Quote
It's a way of controlling the operation of the camera that combines digital and analogue controls. It may not be good for everyone.
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jjj

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Re: Fuji X-T1 review
« Reply #27 on: February 21, 2014, 09:55:46 am »

I never knew being a sucker could be so fun and so useful. I'm loving it.
 ;D
So you enjoy using something that is poorly thought out and so very easily improved.   ???  Well each to his own.

And you also ignored my point that your reasoning re seeing setting at a glance is actually completely wrong. Seems like you like the camera [nothing wrong with that] and now are post rationalising to try and justify it.
« Last Edit: February 21, 2014, 10:32:27 am by jjj »
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jjj

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Re: Fuji X-T1 review
« Reply #28 on: February 21, 2014, 10:29:52 am »

Great work on your site. I particularly like your portrait section.
Cheers for the kind words.  :)

Quote
As far as high speed. Flash is concerned, this is where I particularly prefer the external strobes. The einsteins are as good as the profotos for high speed capture. The problem obviously is getting a fast enough shutter speed. A lot of guys really like the X100/s for it's leaf shutter for this reason.
This is always the issue, which compromise do you go with. Only HSS as far as I'm aware allows you to be completely flexible with shutter aperture combinations, the compromise there is reduced output at high shutter speeds, but then wide apertures do compensate for that. Or it can be addressed with more flashes. Take for example shooting a portrait on a sunny day and you want to use f2.8 and flash. Using the 1/film speed guide to base exposure for iso 100 makes for 1/100@f16 which equates to 1/3200@f2.8. Not sure what leaf shutter or external strobe can cope with that.

Quote
I'd actually like to have the time to do some testing of the compact system cameras in that kind of context - real world location portraits and so on. A tripod in the woods is nice but not always the most telling about usability for working pros.
For working pros good [consistent] ergonomics is absolutely key, missing a shot or fumbling in front of client with poorly designed controls do not make one look professional.
And as lovely as the Fuji is, it's clunky in a couple of areas as fiddly shutter dial and conflicting muscle memory issues will trip you up. I shoot manual 90% of the time, so clumsy controls are more of an issue than for the typical automatic shooter.

Quote
As for the control layout/style, I hear what you're saying about the modern gear, but for many there's a  real pleasure in the traditional analog controls. I'm kind of on that side of the fence thought I appreciate really good modern design as we'll. I'd be excited to try a really forward thinking 'next' type of camera. But there's no taking those risks (bc of the $$ involved, sadly). On the other end, the return to a retro style is good too. Fuji has gotten a Lot right about that.
I love beautiful objects and I think the Fuji is certainly a very nice looking camera, but my absolute pet hate in design is where something's functionality is impaired in order to make it prettier. To me that is the epitome of bad/stupid design. A camera is not an objet d'art, it is a tool and should be primarily designed with that in mind. Mind you I've often thought cameras are to some men male jewellery. Things to be hung around neck in order to look pretty/cool. Some folks at the local camera club I went to whilst at school used Leicas for displaying. I also thought Leicas were poorly designed if you wanted to actually take photographs though and definitely appeal to the style over function crowd.
« Last Edit: February 21, 2014, 10:56:21 am by jjj »
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Pelao

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Re: Fuji X-T1 review
« Reply #29 on: February 21, 2014, 11:36:07 am »

Quote
Being an old dude...

I forgot to respond to this. A sign of age... ;)

One of the good things about being in the mature club is the experience it brings. Accumulated mistakes not to be repeated if you will. I like knowing what works for me, what doesn't, and yet being open to trying.
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Manoli

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Re: Fuji X-T1 review
« Reply #30 on: February 21, 2014, 12:01:01 pm »

Using the 1/film speed guide to base exposure for iso 100 makes for 1/100@f16 which equates to 1/3200@f2.8. Not sure what leaf shutter or external strobe can cope with that.

Profoto B4 Air.
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jjj

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Re: Fuji X-T1 review
« Reply #31 on: February 21, 2014, 01:26:23 pm »

Profoto B4 Air.
Ooh! That's interesting. About time too.
Seems like a very new innovation as they are still appear to be working on backwards engineering Nikon compatibility.
Not sure they'll fit in even my big backpack though.  :(
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Manoli

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Re: Fuji X-T1 review
« Reply #32 on: February 21, 2014, 02:56:49 pm »

Ooh! ... Not sure they'll fit in even my big backpack though.

A minor inconvenience - that's what assistants are for ! Don't tell me you carry your own backpack ?
(it's Friday evening ... usual frivolity disclaimers apply.)
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jjj

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Re: Fuji X-T1 review
« Reply #33 on: February 21, 2014, 03:27:15 pm »

Unfortunately the last serf managed to pick the lock on his cage and I've not been able to trap a new one. They got wise to copies of photography magazine laid out as bait.
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peterottaway

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Re: Fuji X-T1 review
« Reply #34 on: February 22, 2014, 01:19:01 am »

Well you might keep your serfs longer if you offered to upgrade the ones who perform well to villeins.

Seriously though Fuji will start running into problems at the T1 price point because you can buy the Canon 6D and Sony A7 for the same sort of money. The Nikon D610 is only about $150 more. I would think this may limit the market to those with a very specific set of needs. That is even without the competition from other Fuji cameras. Competition at this sort of price point has come sooner than Fuji anticipated.

One minute Fuji execs see no reason to consider FF cameras and then they are considering them ( keeping the faith full, faith full ? ) and now onto expect 2015.
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David Sutton

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Re: Fuji X-T1 review
« Reply #35 on: February 22, 2014, 03:32:00 am »

Seriously though Fuji will start running into problems at the T1 price point because you can buy the Canon 6D and Sony A7 for the same sort of money. The Nikon D610 is only about $150 more. I would think this may limit the market to those with a very specific set of needs. That is even without the competition from other Fuji cameras. Competition at this sort of price point has come sooner than Fuji anticipated.

I doubt price will necessarily be a big factor. Once I tried an X-E2 it so fitted my needs for a lightweight camera that would make detailed 24 inch prints, I sold all the Canon gear. It was nice to have a credit of $1500 left over, but not a deal breaker.
The added factor is that I am having fun with this system. That was unexpected but is now worth a lot to me.
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Christoph C. Feldhaim

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Re: Fuji X-T1 review
« Reply #36 on: February 22, 2014, 06:33:20 am »

I doubt price will necessarily be a big factor. Once I tried an X-E2 it so fitted my needs for a lightweight camera that would make detailed 24 inch prints, I sold all the Canon gear. It was nice to have a credit of $1500 left over, but not a deal breaker.
The added factor is that I am having fun with this system. That was unexpected but is now worth a lot to me.

I was in a situation to buy a first serious digital system and I went for Fuji, because of the quality+versatility per bulk factor - simple as that.
For high resolution stuff I still use MF film any my Mamiya 7, but will change to large format in the future.
For me the best possible combo.
If I were a pro with dire needs for a sophisticated flash system, tethering  and other features it would have looked different,
but for an amateur its an awesome solution, and even many pros love it.

ndevlin

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Re: Fuji X-T1 review
« Reply #37 on: February 22, 2014, 09:19:20 am »

Profoto B4 Air.

And if you don't want to spend a fortune: http://www.paulcbuff.com/ads-e640.php

Seriously, the high-speed capability and colour accuracy of these, for the price ($500US) is really amazing.

- N.
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Nick Devlin   @onelittlecamera        ww

jjj

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Re: Fuji X-T1 review
« Reply #38 on: February 22, 2014, 11:21:02 am »

And if you don't want to spend a fortune: http://www.paulcbuff.com/ads-e640.php

Seriously, the high-speed capability and colour accuracy of these, for the price ($500US) is really amazing.
That's high/short flash speed, not high flash sync speed, which is what you need for flexible outdoor control.
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barryfitzgerald

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Re: Fuji X-T1 review
« Reply #39 on: February 22, 2014, 01:57:46 pm »

2 issues raised.
"Retro theme"
Well modern cameras have moved on from lens aperture rings and shutter speed dials, if you like that or not depends on what you do.
I've tons of dials and controls on my 2 x Minolta Dynax 7 bodies, in fact more controls than just about any camera I've ever used, and not Canon buttons, but real dials to controls all aspects of the camera and you can see many settings with the unit powered off.

I've mixed feelings on the retro area. I mostly use aperture priority and even a single control dial can set that pretty quickly.
I'm not convinced a fairly loose on lens aperture ring for electronic control is really a very good solution. Not would I use the shutter speed dial a lot.

This isn't film, this is digital and things have changed a bit in some ways. I still do a bit of film but I'd much rather use a modern body like the Dynax 7 than an old MF body (for many reasons)

Down to taste but yes I am getting a bit tired of retro, it's not always the best solution.
I won't disagree that with FF prices coming down cameras like this Fuji will have to fall in price a bit, unlike some I don't see an end to APS-C soon, but prices will have to adjust of course. On the other hand the X-T1 doesn't look too bad price wise v the EM-1 which is more expensive.

Back to retro, anyone saying it's not a theme or nothing to do with marketing isn't really paying attention much!
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