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Author Topic: Tilt/Shift lens vs. Focus stacking and PS  (Read 4944 times)

willowsr

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Tilt/Shift lens vs. Focus stacking and PS
« on: February 14, 2014, 01:12:34 am »

Can anyone make a persuasive argument for T/S lenses over Helicon Focus (or PS focus stacking) and PS.   I've had the Nikon 45mm PC-E (from NPS) for a week now, and while it is superbly sharp and easy to use i'm not yet seeing results (i'm in the private sector- those of you who have seen Ghostbusters will know what I mean) that justify the bucks.  An old GX680III with a P45 can do, if slowly, all the same work.  Or better Helicon Focus, layers, masks and blur.  Or am I, once again, in error?
Regards,
Jed
www.Beastsandtheirpeople.com
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Christoph C. Feldhaim

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Re: Tilt/Shift lens vs. Focus stacking and PS
« Reply #1 on: February 14, 2014, 02:02:12 am »

Try to focus stack a seaside shot with waves ....
A flock of birds ...

Paulowen

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Re: Tilt/Shift lens vs. Focus stacking and PS
« Reply #2 on: February 14, 2014, 03:05:13 am »

With a tilt shift lens you can get the shot done in one go (or two if you want to blend exposures). The other useful thing to remember is that "tilt" is only one half of the available movements. "Shift" is a very useful feature that makes shooting panoramas real easy as well as being unbeatable for correcting converging verticals - this, again, is simpler and quicker to do in the field than by using software later. I also use the 24mm TSE for "mega-pixel" images - 9 images taken at different shift orientations that are stitched to give a huge image.
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robdickinson

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Re: Tilt/Shift lens vs. Focus stacking and PS
« Reply #3 on: February 14, 2014, 03:05:56 am »

I never use my TSE for miniature effects.
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hjulenissen

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Re: Tilt/Shift lens vs. Focus stacking and PS
« Reply #4 on: February 14, 2014, 03:26:09 am »

Some things can only be done "in camera". Tilting to capture a scene with movement would seem like such a thing.

Other things can be approximated in post processing. The questions then are : what is the difference in cost, quality and time spent. Some might also think that the quality of time spent matters (typically that it is better to spend 10 more minutes with setting up your camera, than 10 more minutes editing with photoshop.)

*Shifting the lens to make buildings appear as if perspective was altered:
If a good ts lens costs $2000, what can be accomplished by purchasing a better (non-ts) lens and/or a camera of denser sensels, and doing the corresponding stretch in software? If the stretch is moderate, I would guess that the latter solution can be competitive.

*Shifting a lens for panoramas
How many are doing this the "right" way (fixing the lens, shifting the camera), and how much better are your results than using dedicated accessories for moving the camera + lens?

I am primarily interested in the tilt (not for fake miniatures), but the prices are stopping me.

-h
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Paulowen

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Re: Tilt/Shift lens vs. Focus stacking and PS
« Reply #5 on: February 14, 2014, 07:20:39 am »

*Shifting a lens for panoramas
How many are doing this the "right" way (fixing the lens, shifting the camera), and how much better are your results than using dedicated accessories for moving the camera + lens?

To be honest I was a little dubious but since using the Pro P Solutions adapter for the 24mm TSEII I have found that there is greater accuracy when moving camera body rather than lens - especially if there are elements in the image close to the camera. I used to employ a sliding rail and compensate for lens movement but this method can be "confusing" in the field - I always ended up forgetting whether I had shifted the lens/camera  :-*

The current technology found in software is awesome and can probably replicate many of the features found on tilt shift lenses - I prefer using the lens  ;D
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Rob C

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Re: Tilt/Shift lens vs. Focus stacking and PS
« Reply #6 on: February 14, 2014, 08:40:07 am »

*Shifting a lens for panoramas
How many are doing this the "right" way (fixing the lens, shifting the camera), and how much better are your results than using dedicated accessories for moving the camera + lens?

To be honest I was a little dubious but since using the Pro P Solutions adapter for the 24mm TSEII I have found that there is greater accuracy when moving camera body rather than lens - especially if there are elements in the image close to the camera. I used to employ a sliding rail and compensate for lens movement but this method can be "confusing" in the field - I always ended up forgetting whether I had shifted the lens/camera  :-*

The current technology found in software is awesome and can probably replicate many of the features found on tilt shift lenses - I prefer using the lens  ;D



I remember a demonstration about this in LuLa: there was a tree or a bush of some sort in the foreground, and after the background had been 'corrected' for verticals in software, the bush/tree in the foreground was distorted beyond any one of Nature's worst in-jokes.

Do it in camera where you can.

Rob C

ACH DIGITAL

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Re: Tilt/Shift lens vs. Focus stacking and PS
« Reply #7 on: February 14, 2014, 10:52:49 am »

I use both at the same time. Tilting and Helicon Focus does the job for me.!

Combining both reduces the amount of shots needed.

The way I work is less orthodox, more flexible and allows me to concentrate on the creative process rather than heavy technicalities.

Some people does computations in order to get a shot right. It's just not my style.

ACH

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Antonio Chagin
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