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Author Topic: camera carrying bags for wilderness trecking  (Read 5256 times)

wofsy

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camera carrying bags for wilderness trecking
« on: July 09, 2012, 09:26:38 am »


What camera bags and harnesses do you recommend for hiking and camping in the wilderness - remote Alaska?

The trip includes tent camping on the Denali tundra and kayacking in Lake Clark. I'd like to take a 5d Mark 2, and 24-105mm and 70-200 mm zoom lenses. And tripod.
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Colorado David

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Re: camera carrying bags for wilderness trecking
« Reply #1 on: July 09, 2012, 02:05:22 pm »

I think what you're asking is what backcountry camping/backpack system will also accommodate your camera body, two lenses and a tripod.  If this is the case, you should go to a real backpacking/mountaineering shop and ask for help and a fitting.  Your requirements for backcountry trekking are higher than for the extra burden of your camera gear.  I have often wrapped a camera and lenses inside other stuff in my backpack and strapped a tripod to the outside.  More often I've carried a camera with once lens attached since a camera in your pack is a lot like bear spray in your pack; useless.  You may find times when you decide to go on rather than stop to dig out you camera if it isn't readily accessible.

Ken Bennett

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Re: camera carrying bags for wilderness trecking
« Reply #2 on: July 09, 2012, 02:29:35 pm »

I do a lot of backpacking, and when I really want to bring a "real" camera, I use a pouch to hold the camera gear inside a regular backpacking pack. I have a Mountainsmith Kit Cube which will hold a 5D2 with a 24-105 attached, and a 70-200/4. It won't hold anything else, but a spare battery and cards fit in my ditty bag that also holds my first aid kit, etc. That pouch rides inside the top of my pack. If I want a tripod, it's strapped to the outside of the pack.

Given that the vast majority of what you'll be carrying is hiking-related (or kayaking-related, which is a whole separate topic), I'd be a lot happier with a real hiking pack.
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larkis

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Re: camera carrying bags for wilderness trecking
« Reply #3 on: July 09, 2012, 04:12:54 pm »

The one I use is Tilopa BC , it fits my 645D, 5 lenses (300mm, 120mm, 150mm, 55mm, and the new 25mm) a rain jacket, a monarch foldable chair, a few pieces of food, flashlight, leatherman multi tool and a tripod on the side. After having had multiple bags for my gear this one is the most practical out in the field so far. I also find the fact that I can access my gear without taking the pack off essential. The bag is constructed in such a way that allows you to for example put it down in wet snow without ending up with a wet back once you put the bag back on.

Kerry L

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Re: camera carrying bags for wilderness trecking
« Reply #4 on: July 10, 2012, 08:11:23 am »

I'm not clear if you're looking for advice on a single pack for both hiking and camera gear or a separate pack for your camera gear.

While on the trail, I carry my camera gear and lenses in my main pack and include a LowePro fanny pack for hikes once the campsite is set up. I have worn the fanny pack and camera gear on my front while wearing the main pack. This is OK and workable but not the most comfortable arrangment.

The trick is to wrap the lenses and body so that they don't get beat-up, while lying loose in the top of the main pack without adding a lot of weight and bulk. On a long trip, weight is the enemy.

I strap my tripod to the main backpack in a vertical position, keeping it as low as possible to reduce snagging branches.

Don't forget a charging system for camera batteries if the trip is long. I've adapted a small folding solar panel that takes about 6 hrs to charge a battery. This actually weighs less than carrying more than 2 extra batteries.
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Chairman Bill

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Re: camera carrying bags for wilderness trecking
« Reply #5 on: July 10, 2012, 08:39:55 am »

I strap the tripod to the outside of my pack (Crux AK47, or my old Berghaus Cyclops Roc), wrap lenses in clothing & stuff in the pack, where my camera & lens goes if the weather turns really foul. Otherwise the camera is on me, rather than stowed.

lfeagan

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Re: camera carrying bags for wilderness trecking
« Reply #6 on: July 10, 2012, 01:21:52 pm »

A pack meant for backpacking is the only way to go. I keep my camera ready to go using Tamrac N-11 straps. The clips are the same as those on standard Tamrac straps (and so can be easily interchanged). Others hiking with me use the same system and it makes swapping cameras easy.
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stever

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Re: camera carrying bags for wilderness trecking
« Reply #7 on: July 10, 2012, 08:47:13 pm »

i wouldn't feel too comfortable in a Kayak without a dry bad.  i used a Dakine dry pack for wet landings in the arctic - okay for short hikes but not something to carry all day

i agree that you're better off with a good back pack and separately packaging the camera - there are a variety of neoprene pouches for lenses and bodies, and i'd consider a dry bag to be used when necessary.  the issue is access which can be solved by camera and lens carriers in front depending on conditions
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Petrus

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Re: camera carrying bags for wilderness trecking
« Reply #8 on: July 11, 2012, 12:56:46 am »

Like said, a camera pack is useless for carrying camping gear, but certainly not the other way around. To keep things light I just wrap lenses in spare clothes, if hiking in a rainy place also in a SeaToSummit silnylon waterproof pouch, which I use also for clothing and sleeping bag. They weigh very little and save space (I replace the sleeping bag stuff bag with a 20 liter STS bag also). Camera with "standard lens", whatever it happen to be, i just have hanging by my neck, or thrown on the top of my pack, which is usually flat enough to hold it. If it does not, there is the neck strap.

Kayaking and backpacks do not really fit together at all, you need watertight stuff sacks which are small enough to fit inside the cargo holds. You rally can have only one camera out, and if it is not in a watertight underwater enclosure it will be ruined if you take a dip. So the only practical way is to have the camera in a watertight pouch and just unwrap it for each photo-op, which is clumsy and slow, or take your chances and have it out at all times (it will get wet from the water dripping form the paddle). How dangerous this is depends on the stability of the kayak, your proficiency at kayaking and the wave conditions. Canoeing is quite a lot safer, drier and more convenient for a photographer, by the way. And easier to pack.
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muntanela

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Re: camera carrying bags for wilderness trecking
« Reply #9 on: July 11, 2012, 05:16:46 am »



i agree that you're better off with a good back pack and separately packaging the camera - there are a variety of neoprene pouches for lenses and bodies, and i'd consider a dry bag to be used when necessary.  the issue is access which can be solved by camera and lens carriers in front depending on conditions

A waistpack could be useful.
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