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Author Topic: Camera Fatigue  (Read 13600 times)

nicholask

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Camera Fatigue
« on: March 14, 2012, 08:02:43 pm »

I seem to have completely lost interest in the all the new rounds of cameras.

Having come through film in the 80's, and shooting on Leicas, Blads, Mamiyas, Nikons, Canons, Sinars, and more, then migrating to digital in 2000, and shooting digital Canons, and medium format with digital backs, I reckon I have new camera fatigue.

The last camera I bought was the 5D Mk2. Seems pretty good. Clients are happy. Would buy more of 'em, and they would get the job done. Been using Broncolor Monoblocks from the 80's that are rock solid, and I prefer them over my Profoto Acutes for accuracy, although they weigh a tonne.

Anyone else experiencing camera fatigue like me? Share your story.javascript:void(0);

marcmccalmont

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Re: Camera Fatigue
« Reply #1 on: March 14, 2012, 09:00:18 pm »

I hear you brother! The cameras that did it for me are the 5D, IQ180 and K5
The 5DII is just lackluster and the noise in the shadows and sky has always bothered me
I'm hoping the 800E brings back the enthusiasm
Marc
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Marc McCalmont

nicholask

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Re: Camera Fatigue
« Reply #2 on: March 14, 2012, 09:09:56 pm »

I hear you brother! The cameras that did it for me are the 5D, IQ180 and K5
The 5DII is just lackluster and the noise in the shadows and sky has always bothered me
Marc

Yeah, I preferred the 5D. Liked the contrast better. Mk2 has always been too hyped contrast wise for me.

BernardLanguillier

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Re: Camera Fatigue
« Reply #3 on: March 14, 2012, 10:58:52 pm »

I have found the Nikon J1 to deliver this kind of refreshing experience.

Point and shoot... 100% silent, 99% sharp, 99% perfectly exposed... + one click DxO conversion to get highly printable results with zero time spent.

Cheers,
Bernard

Mike Boden

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Re: Camera Fatigue
« Reply #4 on: March 14, 2012, 11:46:37 pm »

I'm sorry, but I don't have camera fatigue. Quite the opposite. I'm still excited with the results of my Canon 1ds MKii, but look forward to the day of upgrading to any of the newer cameras. Additionally, I sill love shooting with all of my old film cameras, whether it's a Holga, a Contax 645 or a large format 4x5 or 8x10. As long as I'm making images, I'm happy!
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Rhossydd

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Re: Camera Fatigue
« Reply #5 on: March 15, 2012, 06:11:04 am »

I seem to have completely lost interest in the all the new rounds of cameras.

The last camera I bought was the 5D Mk2. Seems pretty good. Clients are happy. Would buy more of 'em, and they would get the job done.....

Anyone else experiencing camera fatigue like me? .
You haven't got 'camera fatigue' you've got forum fatigue.
I think it's perfectly reasonable that once you've got something that does the job properly, why should you get excited about new versions if they don't offer you any significant advantage ?
Too many people seem taken in by the whole new=better marketing hype and fail to see that many mature products do the job very well and will continue to do it for a long time yet.

I'm sure we'd all end up happier if the cycle of product development slowed down a lot. We'd have time to learn how to get the best out of things, we wouldn't be wasting so much money on stuff loosing it's value so quickly, the manufacturers would have more time to get their products better and probably be able to charge more for them, so it doesn't need to mean less profit, just less waste.
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Rob C

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Re: Camera Fatigue
« Reply #6 on: March 15, 2012, 07:52:25 am »

You haven't got 'camera fatigue' you've got forum fatigue.
I think it's perfectly reasonable that once you've got something that does the job properly, why should you get excited about new versions if they don't offer you any significant advantage ?
Too many people seem taken in by the whole new=better marketing hype and fail to see that many mature products do the job very well and will continue to do it for a long time yet.

I'm sure we'd all end up happier if the cycle of product development slowed down a lot. We'd have time to learn how to get the best out of things, we wouldn't be wasting so much money on stuff loosing it's value so quickly, the manufacturers would have more time to get their products better and probably be able to charge more for them, so it doesn't need to mean less profit, just less waste.



Probably one of the most sensible and realistic observations on the matter to date.

Had my D200 been blessed with the sensor of my D700 I would have the D700 alone, instead of having the D200 as a seldom-if-ever-used appendage that has lost me a stack of money I most certainly did not expect to lose so rapidly. That alone is sufficient to save me from the charms of the D800 etc. that now smile prettily from the glossy sites; that, and the fact that the D700 is as good as my current and probable needs will ever require. I am not a charitable institution; I doubt I am charitable at all and most certainly never when it comes to my money. I always felt it took too much effort to find it to promote easy disposal of same.

Rob C
« Last Edit: March 21, 2012, 06:03:26 am by Rob C »
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KevinA

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Re: Camera Fatigue
« Reply #7 on: March 15, 2012, 08:10:04 am »

I awoke this morning to Sunshine and mist, so I decided to take a couple off hours from the computer keywording sorting and uploading. I picked my favourite camera and trotted off to see what I could shoot for fun. Just some corny old images, but I like doing it, the camera I pick up for fun is a Rolleiflex 3.5F, one lens no batteries and pocket full of film. The other fun thing about the Rollei, I paid £650. for it last year, it's dam near mint condition I could sell it tomorrow for double or treble if I wanted to. I can't say that about my 1Ds's II's and IIIs.
I get zero pleasure from using a digital anything, the pleasure comes when the invoice gets paid for the work. I'm looking for a tele Rolleiflex at a good price, I'm in no hurry, I have others on my list also.
One other thing each new digital camera to me just makes film look even nicer, the latest McDigital holds no excitement other than a means to pay the bills. Canon seam hell bent on giving you not quite what you think you should be getting for a lot more money. To me a Rolleiflex gives you exactly what you expect, brilliantly done.

Kevin.
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JPrimgaard

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Re: Camera Fatigue
« Reply #8 on: March 16, 2012, 11:32:16 am »

Fatigue?  No way!

I've recently aquired a NEX 7 and I am thrilled.  My last DSLR was the 5D and a good assortment of L glass.  While the NEX 7 is not a perfect camera it is a most refreshing departure from the limitations imposed by the mirrored design of the SLR's of the past.  The NEX is a preview of what is coming.  It's small and light wieght, image quality is superb and the interface is very usable.  It still needs refinement but it's a great start.

My DSLR has been sold and I eagerly anticipate the next round of innovation in the mirrorless camera line.

P.S.  I shoot for fun, not for profit.
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jeremypayne

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Re: Camera Fatigue
« Reply #9 on: March 16, 2012, 01:05:36 pm »

Anyone else experiencing camera fatigue like me? Share your story.javascript:void(0);

Nope ... quite the contrary.

36MP DSLRs?  Mirrorless wunderkids?  Precisely machined tech cameras with removable 180MP backs?

Are you kidding?  This is the Golden Age ...   
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nightfire

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Re: Camera Fatigue
« Reply #10 on: March 20, 2012, 06:11:53 pm »

I'm sure we'd all end up happier if the cycle of product development slowed down a lot. We'd have time to learn how to get the best out of things, we wouldn't be wasting so much money on stuff loosing it's value so quickly, the manufacturers would have more time to get their products better and probably be able to charge more for them, so it doesn't need to mean less profit, just less waste.

No matter how fast the cycle of product development spins, we ourselves are to blame for our use of time+money and our purchase decisions. If we choose to dump our gear every year for the seemingly next big thing instead of learning to master it until it falls apart, then that's not really the camera companies' fault, is it?  ;)

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SecondFocus

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Re: Camera Fatigue
« Reply #11 on: March 21, 2012, 12:23:32 am »

It was a few years ago that Andy Summers did a presentation at the closing night for the Palm Springs Photo Festival. Lead guitarist for the "Police" his avocation was photography and has published books of his work which is stellar. He professed that at one point he moved away from his Leica to the newer digital. But it equated with his loss of interest in shooting. Moving back to Leica and film revitalized his photography.

Personally I think digital moves us more into paying attention to the technical as compared to the art of photography. Shoot film!
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K.C.

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Re: Camera Fatigue
« Reply #12 on: March 21, 2012, 02:54:01 am »

You haven't got 'camera fatigue' you've got forum fatigue.

So true.

If you pick up a camera and shoot instead of reading about it you'd be amazed how much better you get a photography.

Nothing fatiguing about that.
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Rhossydd

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Re: Camera Fatigue
« Reply #13 on: March 21, 2012, 05:22:08 am »

I don't think you've really grasped the idea behind what I've written in that paragraph.
If we choose to dump our gear every year for the seemingly next big thing instead of learning to master it until it falls apart, then that's not really the camera companies' fault, is it?
It is their fault, if they're releasing products too soon without proper development. Plus, don't underestimate the effect of big advertising budgets on how much people spend.

Bernard's article D100 - D800 is quite pertinent in this discussion. Since the digital revolution swept film off the shelves, there's actually not been a lot of advance in the technology. Resolution has roughly doubled, software has become slicker, printers are a little better, but the prints hanging on the wall haven't improved that much.
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Rob C

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Re: Camera Fatigue
« Reply #14 on: March 21, 2012, 06:13:40 am »

It was a few years ago that Andy Summers did a presentation at the closing night for the Palm Springs Photo Festival. Lead guitarist for the "Police" his avocation was photography and has published books of his work which is stellar. He professed that at one point he moved away from his Leica to the newer digital. But it equated with his loss of interest in shooting. Moving back to Leica and film revitalized his photography.

Personally I think digital moves us more into paying attention to the technical as compared to the art of photography. Shoot film!
[/b]



So right. And it mirrors my own oft-stated stance, that had digital been the only game in town all those years ago, then it's unlikely I'd have even thought about becoming a photographer. Film is visceral where digital is not.

I'd really like to know just how many people that took up photography in the 50s would have been interested if film hadn't been around. I'm not claiming any wonderful claim about film; no, it's all about the fact that cameras were user-friendly, so easy and simple to learn and to use. Master one and you'd mastered them all, except for LF, which was another game out on its own.

Rob C
« Last Edit: March 21, 2012, 11:22:56 am by Rob C »
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Ellis Vener

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Re: Camera Fatigue
« Reply #15 on: March 21, 2012, 08:27:21 am »

"Personally I think digital moves us more into paying attention to the technical as compared to the art of photography."

What bunk people tell themselves. Fortunately some of us are old enough and wise enough to know better.

 What digital photographic technology has done is open up the possibility of more easily manipulating the process. A lot of tech oriented people embrace that.  You can still be just as "straight" of non-obviously process manipulating photographer as you choose to be.

For me, photography is about noticing details and concentrating my (and by extention, my audience's) gaze and attention on them. I have always used photographic techniques and technologies to achieve that end.
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Rhossydd

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Re: Camera Fatigue
« Reply #16 on: March 21, 2012, 09:42:26 am »

it's all about the fact that cameras were user-friendly, so easy and simple to learn and to use.
I'll bet you never worked in a camera shop trying to explain to people how to load film into cameras, how to set exposure, how to focus, why they might need to use a different type of film at night, why their colour photos were yellow indoors, how to use that calculator on the back of a flashgun to work out what f-stop was needed or........................

You think film photography was user friendly ? or easy and simple to learn ? Take off those rose tinted glasses and be objective.
Rob you often go on about how difficult it is for modern photographers to make a living now, just remember that one of the key reasons why photography was a well paid profession then was because it wasn't easy or simple.

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David S

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Re: Camera Fatigue
« Reply #17 on: March 21, 2012, 09:56:25 am »

[/b]



So right And it mirrors my own oft-stated stance, that had digital been the only game in town all those years ago, then it's unlikely I'd have even thought about becoming a photographer. Film is visceral where digital is not.

I'd really like to know just how many people that took up photography in the 50s would have been interested if film hadn't been around. I'm not claiming any wonderful claim about film; no, it's all about the fact that cameras were user-friendly, so easy and simple to learn and to use. Master one and you'd mastered them all, except for LF, which was another game out on its own.



Rob C

---------

Well I started shooting 35 mm B&W and some K ll (ASA 12) in 1957. The camera was simple to set (f stop and shutter speed) and focus was set by guess and I used a light meter. I had fun and am finally in the process of digitalizing many of my slide shots.

But I am delighted to be shooting digital today and enjoy photography as much if not more than I did then. But again, I am still focused on the images and do as little post processing as possible for the great majority. It is just fun to grab the camera and go out and take pictures. (and not have to worry about the cost of each individual shot too!)

Dave S
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Christoph C. Feldhaim

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Re: Camera Fatigue
« Reply #18 on: March 21, 2012, 11:00:30 am »



Fatigue? Not a bit!

rasterdogs

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Re: Camera Fatigue
« Reply #19 on: March 21, 2012, 11:35:27 am »

I do have camera fatigue.
Physically tired from hauling my Canon DSLR and L lenses around.
The tools are willing but the body is weak.

I've pre-ordered a Fuji Xpro-1. Yearning for rangefinder style shooting and something in the avoirdupois realm akin to my old Nikormat.

I grew up in a combo home/portrait studio. I have no nostalgia for film. Love digital tools. Don't miss wet darkrooms or maintaining chemistry
for color film/print processing.

Now, the fact that digital camera are in their souls, computers, that's a whole other conversation.   ::)

-rasterdogs
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