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Author Topic: Working Space with Raw Format  (Read 1583 times)

61Dynamic

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Working Space with Raw Format
« on: November 18, 2004, 12:42:44 pm »

Yes and no. No in the fact that the parameters will have no effect on the actuall RAW file. Yes in the fact that it will effect the preview and histogram display on the back of the camera which is made from a jpg using the parameters.
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RNB

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Working Space with Raw Format
« Reply #1 on: November 18, 2004, 11:08:57 am »

If someone wouldn't mind answering a technical question.....if you are shooting RAW with Canon, does selection of "working space" matter. For a while, I was under the impression that it didn't matter in RAW, but Canon seems to suggest that Adobe RGB is only for those who use commercial [read cymk?] printing. So...

1. Does selection of working space,(or for that matter sharpness, brightness etc.) matter if you are shooting RAW?

2. If it does, what are the pros and cons of the various possibilities.

3. Is there a reference somewhere, a little more complete that the manual for any of the 1D or 1ds cameras (original and MK II) which walks through the various options and functions?

Thanks for any help
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Evan

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Working Space with Raw Format
« Reply #2 on: November 18, 2004, 01:00:20 pm »

Assuming you're talking about color space and settings in the camera:

1.  The color space selected in the camera does not affect the raw capture; however, the color space and settings do affect the histogram displayed on the camera if you are using the histogram as a light meter/to check overexposed areas.  At least this is true on my 10D and D30 - I don't know if this still applies the the MKIIs or not.

2.  Since the histogram represents the in-camera conversion from raw to a jpeg based on the selected color space and settings,  if you're using the histogram as a light meter, you need to be aware that the histogram will show areas that are overexposed (clipped to white) that are not actually overexposed in the raw file.

3.  Don't know myself.  The only sugguestion I have here is to read through Real World Camera Raw.  Good reading even if you don't use Adobe Camera Raw.

Hope this helps!
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