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Author Topic: Love those Trees  (Read 794880 times)

Rob C

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Re: Love those Trees
« Reply #300 on: November 21, 2010, 04:19:55 am »

Yes, now that you mention it, I cannot get my eyes out of that OOF zone...





No, no, no, NO!

That's a psychological stance akin to working with one arm tied behind one's back! Differential focussing is a fine art (?) and it works very well; it's the roots that are the subject, not the irrelevant but unremovable shrubs in front of them! The blur's very lack of obvious detail instantly leads the eye to the main subject.

The only reason you can't avoid seeing the out-of-focus thing now is because you have been made conscious of it as a fault, which to me, at least, it most certainly is not. I never read a photographic law or principle that stated thou shalt render all crisp, from the far reaches of heaven to closest hell!

It works just fine!

Rob C
« Last Edit: November 21, 2010, 09:38:41 am by Rob C »
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pegelli

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Re: Love those Trees
« Reply #301 on: November 21, 2010, 05:00:09 am »

Rob C, while I agree with you in principle when I look at the image the thing that "bothers me" is not so much that the lower branches are out of focus, but the contrast between the lower ones being out of focus and the ones above being in focus. Obviously in the given situation not a lot can be done about it, and indeed the roots as the main subject have a very pleasing structure and texture.
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tim wolcott

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Re: Love those Trees
« Reply #302 on: November 21, 2010, 03:31:12 pm »

NO I really believe its perfect the way it is.  Remember your judging a Jpeg. 

This image was scouted the night before, to be shot if the sunrise with the high cirrus clouds were to create the color.  This image was shot in 1985 with 4x5 camera with a 90 super wide 90mm lens while standing in the water in the middle of winter.  Since I had to stand there without movings or creating a ripple.  You only get one shot to do it right.  I believe it plays very well in the middle.  I saw it, studied it and drew it as it was captured.  The only thing I play with is the cropping at the bottom.  If you crop in a little on the branch it makes your eye go upward and if you crop with lots of room your eye travel around the image.  They both play well, and I have shown both worldwide. 

To answer the focus its tack sharp in the back.  But I'm glad you liked it.  Its my very first color image I ever shot and looks great in B&W also.  Thanks Tim
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Eric Myrvaagnes

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Re: Love those Trees
« Reply #303 on: November 21, 2010, 04:41:01 pm »

NO I really believe its perfect the way it is.  Remember your judging a Jpeg.  

This image was scouted the night before, to be shot if the sunrise with the high cirrus clouds were to create the color.  This image was shot in 1985 with 4x5 camera with a 90 super wide 90mm lens while standing in the water in the middle of winter.  Since I had to stand there without movings or creating a ripple.  You only get one shot to do it right.  I believe it plays very well in the middle.  I saw it, studied it and drew it as it was captured.  The only thing I play with is the cropping at the bottom.  If you crop in a little on the branch it makes your eye go upward and if you crop with lots of room your eye travel around the image.  They both play well, and I have shown both worldwide.  

To answer the focus its tack sharp in the back.  But I'm glad you liked it.  Its my very first color image I ever shot and looks great in B&W also.  Thanks Tim
I agree with you Tim. It's the interaction between the driftwood and the distant shore that makes the composition. Separating the two into different images would give you two weaker images in place of one strong one, IMHO. Beautiful!

Eric
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tom b

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Re: Love those Trees
« Reply #304 on: November 23, 2010, 05:58:30 pm »

The "Leaning Trees" of Greenough, Western Australia get their characteristic lean because of constant strong southerly winds.



Cheers,
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Tom Brown

Eric Myrvaagnes

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Re: Love those Trees
« Reply #305 on: November 23, 2010, 07:27:05 pm »

The "Leaning Trees" of Greenough, Western Australia get their characteristic lean because of constant strong southerly winds.



Cheers,
That's not leaning, that's genuflecting. Or rather, groveling! Amazingly obsequious tree!

Eric
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wolfnowl

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Re: Love those Trees
« Reply #306 on: November 23, 2010, 08:50:31 pm »

One sees trees like that in the high arctic, only much smaller - basically anything that pokes up gets frozen or bitten off by the wind.

Nice shot, BTW!

Mike.
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tom b

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Re: Love those Trees
« Reply #307 on: November 23, 2010, 09:45:45 pm »

The trees are very close to the WA coastline which faces the Indian Ocean. The next land is way across to South Africa. To give a clue as to the strength of the winds, it takes 5 hours to fly Sydney to Perth and 4 hours to fly Perth to Sydney.

Cheers,
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Tom Brown

EduPerez

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Re: Love those Trees
« Reply #308 on: November 24, 2010, 01:51:06 am »

No, no, no, NO!

That's a psychological stance akin to working with one arm tied behind one's back! Differential focussing is a fine art (?) and it works very well; it's the roots that are the subject, not the irrelevant but unremovable shrubs in front of them! The blur's very lack of obvious detail instantly leads the eye to the main subject.

The only reason you can't avoid seeing the out-of-focus thing now is because you have been made conscious of it as a fault, which to me, at least, it most certainly is not. I never read a photographic law or principle that stated thou shalt render all crisp, from the far reaches of heaven to closest hell!

It works just fine!

Rob C

The fact is that this time I intended to separate the roots from the leaves using the luminosity, not the depth of field; so that OOF zone is somehow a failure (¿or perhaps an "unintended success"?). But I agree with you: the image works for me too, and that is what counts; I still consider it "a keeper". Thanks.
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Rob C

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Re: Love those Trees
« Reply #309 on: November 24, 2010, 04:21:18 am »

The trees are very close to the WA coastline which faces the Indian Ocean. The next land is way across to South Africa. To give a clue as to the strength of the winds, it takes 5 hours to fly Sydney to Perth and 4 hours to fly Perth to Sydney.

Cheers,


Tom, is that taking time zones into account?

Rob C

tom b

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Re: Love those Trees
« Reply #310 on: November 24, 2010, 05:13:28 pm »

Yep, taking time zones into account. The last time I flew to Perth the plane flew almost to Melbourne to get the best winds before it flew west. That is about 1000 km and an hour flying time.

Cheers,
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Tom Brown

Rob C

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Re: Love those Trees
« Reply #311 on: November 24, 2010, 05:25:56 pm »

Yep, taking time zones into account. The last time I flew to Perth the plane flew almost to Melbourne to get the best winds before it flew west. That is about 1000 km and an hour flying time.

Cheers,



What is needed is a cabbage diet and afterburners. Cut through any pesky outer winds like a Sabre jet!

Rob C

tom b

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Re: Love those Trees
« Reply #312 on: November 25, 2010, 05:36:13 pm »

It's late spring and the jackarandas are looking stunning. I pass a row of about a dozen trees as I walk to work. I keep being tempted to take a shot. Unfortunately the sight of a middle aged man poking his camera over the fence of a girl's high school is frowned upon for some strange reason.

The only image of a jackaranda was taken in Newtown after I visited the Blue Moon festival. The festival was a mixture of goths and halloween.



Images from the festival can be seen here:

http://www.tombrown.id.au/eclectic/halloween/album/index.html

Cheers,
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Tom Brown

pegelli

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Re: Love those Trees
« Reply #313 on: November 26, 2010, 03:34:24 am »

tom, your shot brought back memories of an old one from me (April 2006) in Clinton NJ.
After I looked it up it's completely different, but still:

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pieter, aka pegelli

Ronny Nilsen

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Re: Love those Trees
« Reply #314 on: November 26, 2010, 05:03:08 am »

Here is one from last winter, I like this a lot, but are unsure if it works for anybody else.

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tim wolcott

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Re: Love those Trees
« Reply #315 on: November 26, 2010, 11:52:44 am »

Here is one from one of my workshops that we shot.  What I tell everyone take some time out to look at what other are doing who exhibit there work.  Look for composition and structure to the trees and landscape.  Trees must have a style like a bonsai.  In most cases.  Look for a beginning to your shot and ending.  Find a balance,  let the force flow.  Tim
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wolfnowl

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Re: Love those Trees
« Reply #316 on: November 27, 2010, 01:56:40 am »

Last year was my first winter in Victoria.  It snowed one day in March, for about 10 minutes in the afternoon.  This year we got hit with an 'early' snowfall of a few cm.  I put 'early' in quotes because in some places I've lived we had over a metre before Hallowe'en. 

Anyway, one of my favourite local sites is a place called 'Christmas Hill', so I went up there for a walk yesterday:

Christmas Hill


Sentinel


Arbutus (Pacific Madrone)


Mike.
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Chairman Bill

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Re: Love those Trees
« Reply #317 on: November 27, 2010, 04:20:29 am »

Mike, I do quite like number 2.

Here's one of mine

pegelli

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Re: Love those Trees
« Reply #318 on: November 27, 2010, 08:38:08 am »

That's a real beauty Chairman Bill, I really like how you've "caught" the light in there!
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pieter, aka pegelli

Chairman Bill

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Re: Love those Trees
« Reply #319 on: November 27, 2010, 01:48:49 pm »

We've had snow pretty early this year. These from this afternoon,
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