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Author Topic: Quick Canon Mirror Lock Up  (Read 8502 times)

tommm

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Quick Canon Mirror Lock Up
« on: September 13, 2009, 11:18:14 am »

Many of us would like to swap the direct print button on Canons for a mirror lock up button but in the mean time here's a quick way to initiate it (sure plenty of people have worked this out but I'd never seen it written anywhere so thought I'd share with those who haven't spotted it yet).

Set your camera to whichever settings you most often use when using mirror lockup (Manual, ISO 100, etc, etc.) plus set mirror lock up, then go into your menu and save user settings as Custom (or Custom 1, 2, 3). Now when you want mirror lock up turn your mode dial to C and mirror lockup is ready set without diving into menus.

It's not perfect as you might not always want to be in manual, ISO 100, etc but I find it fairly handy most of the time.

Tom
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madmanchan

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Quick Canon Mirror Lock Up
« Reply #1 on: September 13, 2009, 12:03:54 pm »

In addition to using the Custom mode (or one of three Custom modes, depending on the model), there are additional ways to access Canon's MLU, depending on your model.

1. Some models have a My Menu, where you can put favorite/common menu items. Stick MLU here, and it'll be easier to find (without having to wade through the custom functions). No significant downsides.

2. Some models have Live View. This effectively locks up the mirror, as well as keeps the shutter open till the point of capture. Additional plus is accurate focus checking (relevant since presumably one is using MLU for the purposes of getting the best possible sharpness). Main downside is reduced battery life.
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Eric Chan

NikoJorj

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Quick Canon Mirror Lock Up
« Reply #2 on: September 13, 2009, 05:01:48 pm »

Don't know if it's very useful on other cameras, but there is a very convenient (if imperfect) way to have it at hand on my goodol'Rebel (300D) : set MLU on from the menu (many thanks to the wasia and UnDutchables hacks!), and toggle drive between one-shot (MLU) and continuous (noMLU).
The frame rate of the continuous drive (2-3fps) is low enough to fire one shot at a time anyway.
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Nicolas from Grenoble
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Adele

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Quick Canon Mirror Lock Up
« Reply #3 on: September 13, 2009, 11:54:52 pm »

I use Live View (Eric's suggestion #2) on my 40D whenever I shoot at night, which is very frequently.   I'm a big fan of Live View particularly for the increased focusing ability, in addition to the MLU.  Reduced battery life has been manageable, just carry extra fully charged batteries.
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budjames

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Quick Canon Mirror Lock Up
« Reply #4 on: September 14, 2009, 06:21:37 am »

I'm a big fan too of LiveView on my Canon 1DsMkIII and 5DMkII to enable MLU.

Also, LiveView is great for taking candid street photos when you don't want to look as obvious when you are taking a photo as you do with the camera up to your eye.

Cheers.
Bud
« Last Edit: September 14, 2009, 06:22:19 am by budjames »
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Bud James
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Wayne Fox

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Quick Canon Mirror Lock Up
« Reply #5 on: September 14, 2009, 01:10:40 pm »

Quote from: madmanchan
2. Some models have Live View. This effectively locks up the mirror, as well as keeps the shutter open till the point of capture.

On the newer Canons, depending on your live view mode, this keeps the "shutter" open until the capture is completed.  In fact, the "shutter" no longer has a mechanical first curtain.  This means using live view as mirror lockup eliminates all sources of vibration because there is no mechanical movement of the camera at all until the exposure completes and the "shutter" closes.
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nstop

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Quick Canon Mirror Lock Up
« Reply #6 on: September 21, 2009, 10:04:36 pm »

I use "C3" on my 40D for mirror lock-up, but there is a downside to this method:  if the camera is allowed to time-out to auto power off, all the settings are restored to the original custom settings.  So if you pause too long between shots, all changes you make to aperture, ISO, exposure compensation, etc. are reset.

That's why I also have MLU on my "My Menu" as well

Brian
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Greg D

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Quick Canon Mirror Lock Up
« Reply #7 on: September 23, 2009, 02:01:52 pm »

Most of you probably already know this, but since no one's mentioned it I'll throw it out.  On all Canons I've seen from the 450d up, if auto-exposure bracketing is set and live view is activated, one shutter press takes all 3 shots.  With drive set to 2 second delay, I rarely need to get out the remote switch anymore or use MLU from the menu.
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erick.boileau

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Quick Canon Mirror Lock Up
« Reply #8 on: September 23, 2009, 03:26:44 pm »

I am using C1 or live view , both
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Eric Myrvaagnes

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Quick Canon Mirror Lock Up
« Reply #9 on: September 23, 2009, 11:57:37 pm »

"Live view?"

You guys make me and my Canon 5D feel so old-fashioned.   

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-Eric Myrvaagnes (visit my website: http://myrvaagnes.com)

erick.boileau

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Quick Canon Mirror Lock Up
« Reply #10 on: September 24, 2009, 01:28:59 am »

the live view button on 5D Mark II is useful , also when using a very dark ND filter
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