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Author Topic: What worked -- and would have been enough?  (Read 7104 times)

rickk

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What worked -- and would have been enough?
« on: February 07, 2009, 09:19:36 am »

Thanks Michael for another fine post-trip gear evaluation. In the final section of the essay, you mention taking too much stuff. Obviously, it is a common problem, especially when concerned about potential breakdowns during a unique/uncommon photo-op. I'm wondering what members from this trip would consider as their minimum kit if they were about to go again.

Rick
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ndevlin

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What worked -- and would have been enough?
« Reply #1 on: February 07, 2009, 12:49:11 pm »

2 bodies of identical resolution

24-70/105

70-300

400 prime (more than 90% of my 'selects' from the EF100-400mm were shot at 400, including a number of my best images. All of them could use more sharpness. So a prime 400 would be in the bag once more.

That covers 96% of shooting.

2 Transcend 300x UDMA 16GB cards.

Macbook Air (next gen) + 2 500GB FW800 drives.
 

In a perfect world, two phase-equiped cameras with a 75-150mm and a 300mm lens (with a TC) would almost do it as well.
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Nick Devlin   @onelittlecamera        ww

Farkled

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What worked -- and would have been enough?
« Reply #2 on: February 07, 2009, 03:45:53 pm »

I'd also be interested in the question's inverse:  did anybody devoutly wish for or absolutely need some piece of gear that they did not bring?
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michael

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What worked -- and would have been enough?
« Reply #3 on: February 07, 2009, 05:23:46 pm »

No one voiced such a wish.

Frankly, we weren't all that focused on equipment. The main event was shooting and the second was learning from the seminars and private interaction with the instructors.

Camera chat was there, but frankly not predominant in any way. Just as it should be.

Michael
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Marlyn

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What worked -- and would have been enough?
« Reply #4 on: February 09, 2009, 12:33:20 am »

Quote from: michael
No one voiced such a wish.

Frankly, we weren't all that focused on equipment. The main event was shooting and the second was learning from the seminars and private interaction with the instructors.

Camera chat was there, but frankly not predominant in any way. Just as it should be.

Michael

Considering the sheer quantity of gear aboard, that is not surprising   I know I would overpack for such an event,  'just in case'.  

Thanks for the reports, very interesting for sure.

Regards

Mark
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NigelC

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What worked -- and would have been enough?
« Reply #5 on: February 09, 2009, 08:21:02 am »

Michael

Just out of curiosity, re. the section on bags, I take it you fly business class as you woudn't get the hand baggage you describe into the cabin from any UK airport/airline I know of in economy (although some airports now allow 2 x handbags. And most airlines limit hand baggage by weight in economy - certainly nowhere near 30lbs/13.5Kg)
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cgf

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What worked -- and would have been enough?
« Reply #6 on: February 09, 2009, 08:30:00 am »

Quote from: NigelC
Michael

Just out of curiosity, re. the section on bags, I take it you fly business class as you woudn't get the hand baggage you describe into the cabin from any UK airport/airline I know of in economy (although some airports now allow 2 x handbags. And most airlines limit hand baggage by weight in economy - certainly nowhere near 30lbs/13.5Kg)

The weight limits for carry-on bags are generally the same regardless of class, they're based on safety for the overhead bins (falling onto people's heads etc).

A caveat would be that on some airlines, in first class, they have a closet-type arrangement for luggage, and you get to take all of your bags (even the big ones) straight into the plane with you. Saves a lot of time when you arrive.

However Michael is probably pulling my trick - make it look small/light and they don't weigh it. My best effort so far was a 30kg+ bag from Sydney to Frankfurt (2 airlines) and no-one asked to weigh it!

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SteveBlack

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What worked -- and would have been enough?
« Reply #7 on: February 09, 2009, 01:50:58 pm »

Quote from: cgf
The weight limits for carry-on bags are generally the same regardless of class, they're based on safety for the overhead bins (falling onto people's heads etc).

A caveat would be that on some airlines, in first class, they have a closet-type arrangement for luggage, and you get to take all of your bags (even the big ones) straight into the plane with you. Saves a lot of time when you arrive.

However Michael is probably pulling my trick - make it look small/light and they don't weigh it. My best effort so far was a 30kg+ bag from Sydney to Frankfurt (2 airlines) and no-one asked to weigh it!


Tons of us had the new Kiboko bag that looks reasonable, fits in the overhead -but holds a TON of gear.  Mine weighted in at at least 2x the limit - but was never asked to weigh it.  As long as it fits in the dimension requirements, you are safe at the vast majority of airports.  I've been travelling 50+ flights a year for years and never had a carry on bag weighed.  Only time anyone has checked the dimensions has been Heathrow, and that was only within the last year.  Just don't walk around lugging a heavy bag and complaining about it as you go through check in


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Robert Roaldi

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What worked -- and would have been enough?
« Reply #8 on: February 09, 2009, 02:03:59 pm »

I got a kick out of the last 2 or 3 posts. The weight limits on airline luggage must be very conservative, because I imagine that a lot of people (not just photographers) are carrying more weight on board than they are supposed to. Since enforcement seems to be lax, the airlines must have a healthy safety cushion built-in, a good thing. I can just see a future news headline where an airliner crashes on take off because of excessive weight with the resulting passenger law suits and the subsequent crack-down on luggage weight that everyone (including photographers) will complain about.
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Robert

image66

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What worked -- and would have been enough?
« Reply #9 on: February 09, 2009, 02:56:09 pm »

Quote from: Robert Roaldi
I got a kick out of the last 2 or 3 posts. The weight limits on airline luggage must be very conservative, because I imagine that a lot of people (not just photographers) are carrying more weight on board than they are supposed to. Since enforcement seems to be lax, the airlines must have a healthy safety cushion built-in, a good thing. I can just see a future news headline where an airliner crashes on take off because of excessive weight with the resulting passenger law suits and the subsequent crack-down on luggage weight that everyone (including photographers) will complain about.

Well, it does happen.

January, 2003, Charlotte, NC.  Commuter flight was overweight and too much weight was put in the back.

A modern 100+ passenger jet has plenty of extra margin as far as getting off the ground and flying. At issue isn't getting off the ground, but the decision-point for flight/abort is moved so far down the runway that if the decision is made to abort, the plane cannot stop in time.  Commuter flights are already right at the limit of performance and the positioning of the weight to maintain proper CG is critical. Unfortunately, a handful of photographers having their overweight bags tossed into the rear compartment is enough to cause major problems.
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BCS

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What worked -- and would have been enough?
« Reply #10 on: February 09, 2009, 03:05:01 pm »

Quote from: image66
Well, it does happen.

January, 2003, Charlotte, NC.  Commuter flight was overweight and too much weight was put in the back.

A modern 100+ passenger jet has plenty of extra margin as far as getting off the ground and flying. At issue isn't getting off the ground, but the decision-point for flight/abort is moved so far down the runway that if the decision is made to abort, the plane cannot stop in time.  Commuter flights are already right at the limit of performance and the positioning of the weight to maintain proper CG is critical. Unfortunately, a handful of photographers having their overweight bags tossed into the rear compartment is enough to cause major problems.

What about overweight photographers?  
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jeremyrh

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What worked -- and would have been enough?
« Reply #11 on: February 09, 2009, 03:51:49 pm »

Quote from: NigelC
Just out of curiosity, re. the section on bags, I take it you fly business class as you woudn't get the hand baggage you describe into the cabin from any UK airport/airline I know of in economy (although some airports now allow 2 x handbags. And most airlines limit hand baggage by weight in economy - certainly nowhere near 30lbs/13.5Kg)
British Airways allow you a cabin bag of 23kg  much better than any (?) other airline.
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giles

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What worked -- and would have been enough?
« Reply #12 on: February 12, 2009, 03:49:41 am »

Quote from: cgf
The weight limits for carry-on bags are generally the same regardless of class, they're based on safety for the overhead bins (falling onto people's heads etc).
Even with that rationale, there is no consistency: 10kg is common, 7kg is known (thank you Qantas), and Aerolineas (don't care if I spelt that right) say 4kg.  Then the airline web sites say one thing about size measurements, the "cabin bag size check" frames at the gates don't match the published rules, and it's all a matter of luck what happens on a particular day.

I used a standard wheeled carry on for flying (not a camera bag).  All I did was wheel it carefully (it liked to overbalance, ahem!) and wheel it right up to the counter at check in so that it was not visible to the check in staff.  (Security you know -- must keep your luggage under  your control at all times, right? )

For insurance I had a photographer's vest in the bag and I had plenty of pockets, but the bag was 24kg and was not weighed once.  Fortunately our only Qantas flight was domestic from Sydney to Melbourne (Qantas have a reputation for weighing bags, at least out of Melbourne), and to my astonishment the Qantas flight staff were polite.

As a mild anti-theft and tampering precaution I put a zip tie on my checked luggage.  It also helps stop the zip coming open as the baggage handlers through the bags around.  (If you do this, don't put the zip ties in the checked bag and do have a knife or scissors in an outside pocket of the bag if you hope to open it before getting to your hotel!)

Giles
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giles

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What worked -- and would have been enough?
« Reply #13 on: February 12, 2009, 04:20:04 am »

Quote from: Marlyn
Considering the sheer quantity of gear aboard, that is not surprising   I know I would overpack for such an event,  'just in case'.
At one point the expedition staff made an announcement over the PA asking people to make safe the equipment lying around in the lounge as we approached some weather.  There was a lot of gear on board.

I don't know how many trips one could safely leave notebooks, cameras, and lenses lying around without worrying about theft.  I cheerfully left my MacBook Pro charging unattended -- after all, everyone had a notebook or two and nobody wanted any more weight to carry.

Giles

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Ed Bacon

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What worked -- and would have been enough?
« Reply #14 on: February 15, 2009, 07:48:29 pm »

One thing that saved my bacon, as it were. I pack my cameras and lens in Pelican 1510. This can fit in almost all overhead bins. From BA to Dulles I flew coach and was told I could only carry on one bag. This of course was my worst nightmare becoming real, but it also why I went from soft bags to a hard case ... just to deal with a worst case scenario. After checking the cameras I was about to joke with the ticketing agent to treat them gently, when it flipped off the conveyer belt between the check-in and the larger one taking bags to the back; great start for a 10 journey. Good news, everything arrived in fine shape.

BTW coming down I could carry both the laptop and the camera bags on board. The rules seem to be more like a guideline (Captain Jack Black). I also notice considerable variability in the scales used to determine if you are over the weight limit.
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Bob Peterson

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What worked -- and would have been enough?
« Reply #15 on: February 15, 2009, 11:17:28 pm »

Quote from: Ed Bacon
BTW coming down I could carry both the laptop and the camera bags on board. The rules seem to be more like a guideline (Captain Jack Black). I also notice considerable variability in the scales used to determine if you are over the weight limit.
Not to mention two other variations on Aerolineas Argentinas:
  • The checked bag weight limit is per passenger, not per bag.  While this is, I gather, common outside the U.S., I wasn't aware of this before I checked my bags for the Buenos Aires to Ushuaia flight. The agent gave me a really odd look when I pulled a small duffel out of my large duffel, which should have resulted in two underweight bags.  However, I quickly learned better.  Oops.
  • Some carry-ons were weighed, but most were not. This, too, varied by agent.  Some folks very quickly decided to leave their carry-on with a friend while checking in, so the agent never saw the carry-on.  The Aerolineas Argentinas agents at the gates didn't seem at all interested in the size or weight of our carry-ons, fortunately.
Bob
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