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Author Topic: Backdrop stands  (Read 2435 times)

RyanT

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Backdrop stands
« on: December 03, 2008, 07:07:00 pm »

I am looking into purchasing a backdrop stand for portrait photography.  I'm not really sure what to look for in a stand other than durability.  I plan on using muslin and other cloth as backdrops.  I have seen some stands that have 3 horizontal bars on them for easier transitioning of backdrops. Does anyone have suggestions on what to avoid with any stands?  I don't want to have to empty my savings acct to buy one but something with decent quality is what I'm looking for.  I'm looking to spend ~$150 give or take.  Any suggestions?
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Ben Rubinstein

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Backdrop stands
« Reply #1 on: December 03, 2008, 08:09:05 pm »

Quote from: RyanT
I am looking into purchasing a backdrop stand for portrait photography.  I'm not really sure what to look for in a stand other than durability.  I plan on using muslin and other cloth as backdrops.  I have seen some stands that have 3 horizontal bars on them for easier transitioning of backdrops. Does anyone have suggestions on what to avoid with any stands?  I don't want to have to empty my savings acct to buy one but something with decent quality is what I'm looking for.  I'm looking to spend ~$150 give or take.  Any suggestions?

Get the toughest stands with the thickest bars possible, light easy to transport stands are a nightmare when supporting heavy cloths with kids rolling on them. I recommend the interfit set which is super strong and don't recommend the manfrotto or lastolite which are a lawsuit waiting to happen.

AndyF

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Backdrop stands
« Reply #2 on: December 03, 2008, 08:40:45 pm »

Are you travelling, or working in a studio?  The only relevant part of a backdrop support is the horizontal bar.  The vertical support depends on where you're working.  So, if you're in a studio, consider hooks into the ceiling, suspend a suitable bar from a loop of chain (which will allow you to adjust the drop from the ceiling) and hang your backdrop from there.  Make sure the hooks into the ceiling do anchor properly of course!

You may need several pairs of hooks, depending on the layers of backdrops you want suspended, or any versatility in placing them in different parts of the studio.  This does free up floor space.

Andy
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RyanT

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Backdrop stands
« Reply #3 on: December 06, 2008, 07:47:40 pm »

Quote from: pom
Get the toughest stands with the thickest bars possible, light easy to transport stands are a nightmare when supporting heavy cloths with kids rolling on them. I recommend the interfit set which is super strong and don't recommend the manfrotto or lastolite which are a lawsuit waiting to happen.



I did a websearch for interfit and could not find anything.  Is there a website I could check them out?  
I have also seen some stands with 3 horizontal bars.  Have you used those?  Are they worth the extra $$?
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RyanT

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Backdrop stands
« Reply #4 on: December 06, 2008, 07:55:21 pm »

Quote from: AndyF
Are you travelling, or working in a studio?  The only relevant part of a backdrop support is the horizontal bar.  The vertical support depends on where you're working.  So, if you're in a studio, consider hooks into the ceiling, suspend a suitable bar from a loop of chain (which will allow you to adjust the drop from the ceiling) and hang your backdrop from there.  Make sure the hooks into the ceiling do anchor properly of course!

You may need several pairs of hooks, depending on the layers of backdrops you want suspended, or any versatility in placing them in different parts of the studio.  This does free up floor space.

Andy


I'm looking for a portable/travelling set.  I can see the hooks and bar would work great for a permanent studio though.  I have also thought of maybe buying 2 stands and using PVC pipe as the horizontal bar.  Do you recommend doing that or would that be too heavy?  
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Colorwave

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Backdrop stands
« Reply #5 on: December 06, 2008, 11:43:08 pm »

Quote from: RyanT
I have also thought of maybe buying 2 stands and using PVC pipe as the horizontal bar.  Do you recommend doing that or would that be too heavy?
PVC = SAG
You won't be happy with PVC over time, if ever, due to it's tendency to bow.  You need aluminum tubing, or steel if you are on a budget.
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AndyF

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Backdrop stands
« Reply #6 on: December 07, 2008, 11:07:19 pm »

Quote from: RyanT
I'm looking for a portable/travelling set.  I can see the hooks and bar would work great for a permanent studio though.  I have also thought of maybe buying 2 stands and using PVC pipe as the horizontal bar.  Do you recommend doing that or would that be too heavy?
PVC, as ColorWave says, would sag.  It might work until the backdrop roll suddenly folded and creased the material.  For my own hanging bar (and this is a personal not professional setup), I use a 6 foot long 1 inch or 1.15 inch dia wood rod.

Andy


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