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Author Topic: Nodal Point / Entry Pupil - Settings  (Read 4462 times)

neil74

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Nodal Point / Entry Pupil - Settings
« on: December 03, 2008, 10:37:34 am »

Hello all,

Are there any nodal point/entry pupil experts out there? as it seems that working out the correct point to rotate around is not necessarily as simple as it may sound, for example some say that the nodal point and entry pupil are not one and the same thing and others even say that they are different depending on whether you mount portrait or landscape (not sure I believe this tbh).  I have been a working photographer for a number of years but have always found the world of nodal points and panoramas confusing.

I saw the tabaware wiki thing but that only covers a few lenses so I am wondering if there are any other sources out there?  Initially I will be using my DP1 and Canon 5D, with the 5D I will probably use the sigma 24-70, maybe my 17-40.  For the future I also have other Nikon kit that I use for my work including D700's and the 24-70 Nikon.  I am only looking to do single row panos with the camera mounted in the portrait format, I have a nodal ninja 180 and L bracket on the way.

I think I have tracked down the DP1 setting as 4.25 cm from the centre of the tripod mount (this may not be true however) but there is nothing on my other kit.  I am going to try and find them myself when I return home but if there are any experts out there your input would be much appreciated.

Many Thanks

Neil
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01af

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Nodal Point / Entry Pupil - Settings
« Reply #1 on: December 03, 2008, 11:12:23 am »

Quote from: neil74
It seems that working out the correct point to rotate around is not necessarily as simple as it may sound ...
It requires some precision trial-and-error, that's right. And usually, that point will change when focusing and---with zoom lenses---when zooming, too.


Quote from: neil74
... some say that the nodal point and entry pupil are not one and the same thing ...
That's right. They are two completely different concepts. Contrary to common belief, the one relevant for no-parallax panning is the entry pupil, not one of the nodal points.


Quote from: neil74
... and others even say that they are different depending on whether you mount portrait or landscape
What a strange idea!  Of course the camera's orientation (portrait or landscape) won't affect the position of the entry pupil.


Quote from: neil74
... have always found the world of nodal points and panoramas confusing.
That's because nodal points have nothing to do with doing panoramas.


Quote from: neil74
... your input would be much appreciated.
Input from others regarding the exact positions of the entry pupils of particular lenses are mostly useless ... they are hardly more than just starting points for your own gauging of your lenses' entry pupils at various focal lengths and focus settings.

By the way, the identification of the entry pupils' positions has to carried out more accurately when your panorama will include foreground items---the closer the closest item, the more accuracy is required. The farther away your subjects are, the less accuracy is required. If you're shooting landscape panos at infinity without any forground items then you can safely ignore the whole entry pupil issue entirely.

-- Olaf
« Last Edit: December 03, 2008, 11:17:50 am by 01af »
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neil74

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Nodal Point / Entry Pupil - Settings
« Reply #2 on: December 03, 2008, 11:20:29 am »

Thanks.  Yes I understand the parallex issue and my landscapes will likely have some foreground detail, hence why I went down the pano head route.

I think I am best off with some trial and error using the methods desribed elsewhere when I get back (away from home currently) I suppose I was just hoping for someone who had used the same equipment as me.  The DP1 setting may or may not be accurate but as it is a prime lens it will at least we less complex than the 24-70.

It may have been easier to fork out for an xpan and a scanner
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