Pages: [1]   Go Down

Author Topic: T/S Lens for D300  (Read 4933 times)

Philip Weber

  • Full Member
  • ***
  • Offline Offline
  • Posts: 185
T/S Lens for D300
« on: May 11, 2008, 04:40:30 pm »

I just purchased a D300 and would like to buy a top quality T/S lens, specifically for landscapes.

Nikon has a new one coming out but they say it's only fully functional on a D3 and I'm not sure it's long enough anyway.

Additionally, this would be my first T/S lens, so I'm still at the low end of the learning curve. Any suggestions would be greatly appreciated.

Thank you,
Phil
Logged

duraace

  • Full Member
  • ***
  • Offline Offline
  • Posts: 218
T/S Lens for D300
« Reply #1 on: May 11, 2008, 09:21:06 pm »

Quote
I just purchased a D300 and would like to buy a top quality T/S lens, specifically for landscapes.

Nikon has a new one coming out but they say it's only fully functional on a D3 and I'm not sure it's long enough anyway.

Additionally, this would be my first T/S lens, so I'm still at the low end of the learning curve. Any suggestions would be greatly appreciated.

Thank you,
Phil
[a href=\"index.php?act=findpost&pid=195086\"][{POST_SNAPBACK}][/a]

If by T/S you're implying Tilt/Shift, I use my D300 and Photoshop to get the T/S effect.  Cheaper than buying a lens.
Logged

Philip Weber

  • Full Member
  • ***
  • Offline Offline
  • Posts: 185
T/S Lens for D300
« Reply #2 on: May 11, 2008, 10:04:54 pm »

Yes, tilt/shift (or PC - Perspective Control in Nikon's terminology).

I didn't know Photoshop could do that with the same quality/precision of a high-end T/S lens (doesn't Photoshop crop the image to get the effect?).

Thanks for the tip. I guess I am wondering why anyone would drop 1-2k on that type of lens if it was that easy!

PW
« Last Edit: May 11, 2008, 11:12:58 pm by Philip Weber »
Logged

Kirk Gittings

  • Sr. Member
  • ****
  • Offline Offline
  • Posts: 1561
    • http://www.KirkGittings.com
T/S Lens for D300
« Reply #3 on: May 11, 2008, 10:17:57 pm »

Quote
Yes, tilt/shift (or PC - Perspective Control in Nikon's terminology).

I din't know Photoshop could do that with the same quality/precision of a high-end T/S lens (doesn't Photoshop crop the image to get the effect?).

Thanks for the tip. I guess I am wondering why anyone would drop 1-2k on that type of lens if it was that easy!

PW
[a href=\"index.php?act=findpost&pid=195138\"][{POST_SNAPBACK}][/a]


There is a fair amount of interpolation if you do PC in Photoshop. It may be acceptable to you. My rule of thumb for my students using DSLRs is if you have to stretch the top of the frame more that 1/3 the width of the frame, interpolation artifacts can be a problem. For architecture, for example, that 1/3 rule is oftentimes not enough correction. Hence why I use the 24,45,90 Canons and a 35 Olympus.
Logged
Thanks,
Kirk Gittings

stever

  • Sr. Member
  • ****
  • Offline Offline
  • Posts: 1245
T/S Lens for D300
« Reply #4 on: May 11, 2008, 10:58:40 pm »

what does Nikon mean by "not fully functional"?

i have a canon 90TS that i use on both full and crop-frame bodies

in some respects, it works better on the crop frame body as there is less vignetting at the limits of tilt and shift - i use this lens primarily for macro, so the crop factor isn't an issue

for landscapes, do you really want to invest this kind of money in a 36mm (equiv) lens?  Where appropriate you can get a very useful increase in depth of field (you won't get this out of photoshop) and a convenient panorama function (more useful for increasing resolution by about 3x than a wide panorama).  

the TS for panorama of course requires no movement of the subject -  as does a pan head with RRS L-plate (which although overpriced is almost an order of magnitude cheaper)

it's really a question of your style and subjects, but i never have too many pixels in landscape shots
Logged

Philip Weber

  • Full Member
  • ***
  • Offline Offline
  • Posts: 185
T/S Lens for D300
« Reply #5 on: May 11, 2008, 11:30:55 pm »

Quote from: stever,May 11 2008, 09:58 PM
what does Nikon mean by "not fully functional"?

It's supposedly fine in every way on the D300 except that the flash restricts the movment of the lens (Nikon's new 24mm PC-E specifically) slightly. I don't whether that small amout makes much difference.

I just started looking into a T/S lens and haven't researched it that much yet. Nikon is supposed to be announcing 2 more later this year; 45mm & 85mm?  

PW
Logged

BernardLanguillier

  • Sr. Member
  • ****
  • Offline Offline
  • Posts: 13640
    • http://www.flickr.com/photos/bernardlanguillier/sets/
T/S Lens for D300
« Reply #6 on: May 11, 2008, 11:58:14 pm »

Quote
I just purchased a D300 and would like to buy a top quality T/S lens, specifically for landscapes.

Nikon has a new one coming out but they say it's only fully functional on a D3 and I'm not sure it's long enough anyway.
[a href=\"index.php?act=findpost&pid=195086\"][{POST_SNAPBACK}][/a]

Nikon has a 24 mm already available and 2 more coming.

I have considered investing in the 24 mm for my D3 but have so far resisted spending that kind of cash since both DoF increase and perspective correction can be done fairly well digitally when these are really mandatory.

Regards,
Bernard

bob mccarthy

  • Sr. Member
  • ****
  • Offline Offline
  • Posts: 372
    • http://
T/S Lens for D300
« Reply #7 on: May 12, 2008, 09:04:03 am »

Quote
I just purchased a D300 and would like to buy a top quality T/S lens, specifically for landscapes.

Nikon has a new one coming out but they say it's only fully functional on a D3 and I'm not sure it's long enough anyway.

Additionally, this would be my first T/S lens, so I'm still at the low end of the learning curve. Any suggestions would be greatly appreciated.

Thank you,
Phil
[{POST_SNAPBACK}][/a]

Do you really want Tilt/Shift or will PC (Shift only) work.

Nikon has offered 35mm PC, 28mm PC and an 85mm T/S for years.

The wides have enough DOF so tilt may be is unnecessary for landscape work.

The PC's are great for stitching, have enough resolution and perform nicely on the D3 and D300 as they auto remove CA, the only weakness the lens have.

couple hundred bucks on ebay.

 Check out link below, follow thread for more than you probably want to know.

[a href=\"http://www.moosepeterson.com/gear/28PC.html]http://www.moosepeterson.com/gear/28PC.html[/url]

Bob
« Last Edit: May 12, 2008, 09:10:04 am by bob mccarthy »
Logged

michael

  • Sr. Member
  • ****
  • Offline Offline
  • Posts: 5084
T/S Lens for D300
« Reply #8 on: May 12, 2008, 11:30:22 am »

My field report on the Nikon 24mm PC-E will be online later today.

Michael
Logged

Philip Weber

  • Full Member
  • ***
  • Offline Offline
  • Posts: 185
T/S Lens for D300
« Reply #9 on: May 12, 2008, 11:50:07 am »

Do you really want Tilt/Shift or will PC (Shift only) work.

Nikon has offered 35mm PC, 28mm PC and an 85mm T/S for years.

The wides have enough DOF so tilt may be is unnecessary for landscape work.

The PC's are great for stitching, have enough resolution and perform nicely on the D3 and D300 as they auto remove CA, the only weakness the lens have.

couple hundred bucks on ebay.

 Check out link below, follow thread for more than you probably want to know.

http://www.moosepeterson.com/gear/28PC.html

Bob


Thank you Bob! You're probably correct in that, just for landscape work, a PC (shift only) would probably do the job. Which of the three do you feel would work best for landscape/panos? I am thinking wide angle (28mm or 35mm).

I'll check out your link later today.

All the best,
Phil

PS Looking forward to reading your review Michael!
PW
Logged

bob mccarthy

  • Sr. Member
  • ****
  • Offline Offline
  • Posts: 372
    • http://
T/S Lens for D300
« Reply #10 on: May 12, 2008, 12:49:08 pm »

Quote
Do you really want Tilt/Shift or will PC (Shift only) work.

Nikon has offered 35mm PC, 28mm PC and an 85mm T/S for years.

The wides have enough DOF so tilt may be is unnecessary for landscape work.

The PC's are great for stitching, have enough resolution and perform nicely on the D3 and D300 as they auto remove CA, the only weakness the lens have.

couple hundred bucks on ebay.

 Check out link below, follow thread for more than you probably want to know.

http://www.moosepeterson.com/gear/28PC.html

Bob
Thank you Bob! You're probably correct in that, just for landscape work, a PC (shift only) would probably do the job. Which of the three do you feel would work best for landscape/panos? I am thinking wide angle (28mm or 35mm).

I'll check out your link later today.

All the best,
Phil

PS Looking forward to reading your review Michael!
PW
[a href=\"index.php?act=findpost&pid=195211\"][{POST_SNAPBACK}][/a]

I own a 35mm PC in prettty nice shape. I would follow Moose's advice to get an OK one and send it back to Nikon for a refurb. Mine got much better when worked on.

Bob
Logged

Philip Weber

  • Full Member
  • ***
  • Offline Offline
  • Posts: 185
T/S Lens for D300
« Reply #11 on: May 12, 2008, 07:40:16 pm »

Quote from: michael,May 12 2008, 10:30 AM
My field report on the Nikon 24mm PC-E will be online later today.

Michael


Thanks for the timely review Michael! If I may, I have a couple of questions for you:

1. As I am a D300 owner, do you feel the adjustment restriction makes an older PC lens a better option? I really only want this for landscape & panos.

2. As I am looking at this for landscape work, would I need to have a service center adjust the lens (as I suspect) or is the factory setting ok for what I need it for? If so, can a local Nikon repair person do it or does it have to be mailed somewhere?

BTW, the video helped a PC beginner like me a lot!

Thanks again and all the best!
Phil
Logged

michael

  • Sr. Member
  • ****
  • Offline Offline
  • Posts: 5084
T/S Lens for D300
« Reply #12 on: May 12, 2008, 07:51:15 pm »

The mechanical problems with the D300 and this lens are really an issue. I wouldn't consider it.

Michael
Logged

JeffKohn

  • Sr. Member
  • ****
  • Offline Offline
  • Posts: 1668
    • http://jeffk-photo.typepad.com
T/S Lens for D300
« Reply #13 on: May 13, 2008, 04:29:21 pm »

Quote
The mechanical problems with the D300 and this lens are really an issue. I wouldn't consider it.

Michael
[a href=\"index.php?act=findpost&pid=195321\"][{POST_SNAPBACK}][/a]
I disagree. There are no functional limitations with the 24 TS-E on a D300. Full tilt and/or shift is possible in all directions. The only limitation is that when using horizontal shift the lens has to be rotated so that the shift knob is at the bottom instead of the top. This means you don't see the distance scale and aperture selection, but to me this is minor inconvenience at most.

In fact I would say if you're wanting to use the lens for flat stitches, you're likely to get better results with a D300 than a D3, because there's noticeable image degradation as you get closer to the edge of the image circle, and the D300 isn't using as much of the image circle even when shifted compared to a full-frame camera like the D3.

It is worth noting that the D300 is an exception; other DX cameras will be more limited due to clearance issues when attempting to use vertical shift.
Logged
Jeff Kohn
[url=http://ww
Pages: [1]   Go Up