Pages: [1]   Go Down

Author Topic: Storing & Carrying all this stuff...  (Read 3755 times)

Josh-H

  • Sr. Member
  • ****
  • Offline Offline
  • Posts: 2054
    • Worldwide Photography Expeditions
Storing & Carrying all this stuff...
« on: February 08, 2008, 08:59:15 pm »

I need some more storage options and carrying options for my kit - the lowe pro range is a little bewildering at best...

What would people reccomend for a days shoot to cart around:

1DSMKIII
16-35mm F2.L or 35mm F1.4L with a 14mm F2.8L
70-200mm F2.8L
300mm F2.8L
Gittzo 3 Series Carbon tripod
+ Usual accessories.

Nature Trekker?

also.. storing all this at home - ive run out of bag space.

What do people store their kit in at home? Bags or hard cases?
Logged

David Sutton

  • Sr. Member
  • ****
  • Offline Offline
  • Posts: 1260
    • David Sutton Photography
Storing & Carrying all this stuff...
« Reply #1 on: February 11, 2008, 02:48:47 am »

It's hard to find something that works. I was looking for a backpack that was comfortable on an 8 hour hike, would access the camera without opening it up completely and would be off my kidneys (I really overheat with no airflow on my lower back), but would take a laptop and all my gear on a plane. I avoided the Lowepro backpacks as being too heavy and  got a  Kata 102 on spec and am quite pleased with it. It has no waist strap to speak of, but that doesn't seem to matter as far as comfort goes, and the tripod holder is brilliant and the camera can be accessed and removed, with the tripod still attached, by an assistant. (HA! I really mean by my girlfriend).
When travelling I carry a small beaten-up Lowepro slingshot in the suitcase and put gear into that if moving around by car for the day. It's more anonymous.
I guess it comes down to whether you need to lug stuff around all day on your back ( in which case you need to try out packs on you back with some heavy weights inside- this can give some nasty surprises with some packs), or whether you are in and out of a car. Good luck, David
Logged

Morgan_Moore

  • Sr. Member
  • ****
  • Offline Offline
  • Posts: 2356
    • sammorganmoore.com
Storing & Carrying all this stuff...
« Reply #2 on: February 11, 2008, 06:15:12 am »

Quote
I need some more storage options and carrying options for my kit - the lowe pro range is a little bewildering at best...[a href=\"index.php?act=findpost&pid=173435\"][{POST_SNAPBACK}][/a]

I thinkyou need to think carefully about how you shoot to anwser this.

Every solution has a positive and a negative

Harnesses

great for true action but difficult to get in a car with it on and tiring because you cant put the stuff down

Shoulder bags
Good access , flexible, puttable down but bad for hiking

 You can move the bag  without doing up all the clips zips and straps

Rucksacks

Rubbish access, all the stuff falls out if you forget to close it but comfortable

Hard cases

Great for vehicles and controlled locations


Home and vehicle storage for me  is done with stackable plastic boxes by alibert (hardware stores) pelicases are probably better but more costly by a factor of 10

-------------

There is probably no one answer

I use billingham bags, and have a lowe pro rucksack too which is rarely used

I have also been know to carry my billingham bag between locations when hiking in a Karrimor 80L rucksack

--------------

You should also question what kit you need for what assignment - can you when hiking,  for instance, have a more pleasant day by sticking to one body and the two zooms

Yes? Then have a belt with a lenspouch for the unsued lens and just put the camera over your shoulder

Try just going out iwth the body and the 35mm - no bag at all

I have a second billingham in my car to dump things I dont want today in

SMM
Logged
Sam Morgan Moore Bristol UK

Nigelfrommanchester

  • Newbie
  • *
  • Offline Offline
  • Posts: 49
    • http://www.nigelatkinson.biz
Storing & Carrying all this stuff...
« Reply #3 on: February 11, 2008, 07:55:48 am »

Luggage is always a compromise unless you have willing porters wherever you go, and photographic luggage is just a sub-set. As others have said, it comes down to what you want to do, where you're going, and how much you want to carry. It is always tempting to take too much kit.

I have two Billinghams (335 and 445),  two LowePro backpacks (stealth and rover AW?, a small inconspicuous bag branded 'David Bailey', a Peli 1510, and standard rucksacks I'm prepared to put gear in. None of these is perfect, and the Peli has never been out of my house because it weighs a ton when it is empty.

I was tempted by the trendy slingshot bags, but you can do the same thing with any shoulder bag .... just put the strap over your head.

Most of the rucksacks don't give enough room for non-photo gear. I want to carry drinks, food, coats, maps, ......

Lately I've been selling lenses to friends, and cutting down on the **** that's getting in the way of taking pictures.

Nigel
Logged
Nigel Atkinson
[url=http://www.nigelatki

Hank

  • Sr. Member
  • ****
  • Offline Offline
  • Posts: 679
Storing & Carrying all this stuff...
« Reply #4 on: February 11, 2008, 11:06:51 am »

There's a law of nature that applies here.  Nature (or camera gear) abhores a vacuum and will expand to fill it.  The more space you have, the more stuff you'll pack.

I agree that there's no single solution to fit all carry requirements.  We have an overflowing locker full of bags, packs, belts and cases.  And we use it all, choosing and adjusting to fit the specific job, kit and carry requirements.  

If you've got a good pro camera shop within driving range, the best possible solution is to get permission to bring in your kit and try it in a variety of packs.  Then put the packs on your back and check for fit.  Our physiques are so variable that one person's perfect pack is another's hell.  

Minimum space for your kit is a prime consideration, but it's trumped by comfort of the carry system and security for small pieces.

More and more for active shooting and long walks I'm growing to love belt pouches along with a conventional backpack.  Put all your gear in pouches and dump them in the pack along with your hiking supplies.  Gear of the moment in its individual pouches are hung from the belt strap of the pack for easy and quick access without removing the pack.  Dump the pack for a few hours or days on an overnight backpacking trip, and the belt pouches are perfect for hanging from your pants belt while you cruise.  Meanwhile all the gear not in current use is padded and sealed from debris in its own padded case within the pack.
Logged

RafalA

  • Newbie
  • *
  • Offline Offline
  • Posts: 17
    • http://www.rafalandronowski.com
Storing & Carrying all this stuff...
« Reply #5 on: February 11, 2008, 11:14:02 am »

What sort of shoot do you mean? Hiking around in the wilds or walking through downtown?

For the former, I use a bunch of Think Tank Photo gear. I just recently got one of the Digital Holsters which swallows my 1DII with a 70-200 2.8 with hood in place. My new favourite bag! In addition, I have a Lens Changer for my 17-40 (also with hood in place). I use the Chimp Cage for either a 24-70, extra 1-series sized body or three flashes, depending on what I'm doing. All this is attached to a Change-Up (a belt-pack), which also fits a variety of things, such as my macro lens (Sigma 150 2.8) and two flashes or the Sigma and another 1-series or the 24-70, Sigma and a flash. Think Tank also have a pouch for the 300 2.8 that will mount to this belt.

All in all, fully loaded the belt weighs a lot - a lot more than I'd want to carry in a shoulder bag for long periods. Also from TTP, I have two shoulder straps that I've attached to the provided rings on the belt and criss-crossed over my chest. I can wear this set-up for hours as it is very comfortable and everything is easy to access.

If you don't want to be the subject of everyone else's photograph in the city, I suggest another Think Tank bag (can you tell I'm addicted to this stuff yet?). It's the Urban Disguise 50 (I think) and it should easily swallow all that gear. Of course, access is a little more difficult but it'll serve to hide the fact you've got so much large, expensive gear with you.

For an even stealthier look, try one of the larger Domke bags. Not sure which one, but I know the larger versions will swallow all that gear as well.

As for the tripod, I either carry it in my hands or sling it over my back (with another Think Tank strap).
Logged

Morgan_Moore

  • Sr. Member
  • ****
  • Offline Offline
  • Posts: 2356
    • sammorganmoore.com
Storing & Carrying all this stuff...
« Reply #6 on: February 11, 2008, 02:40:13 pm »

Quote
More and more for active shooting and long walks I'm growing to love belt pouches along with a conventional backpack.  Put all your gear in pouches and dump them in the pack along with your hiking supplies.  Gear of the moment in its individual pouches are hung from the belt strap of the pack for easy and quick access without removing the pack.  Dump the pack for a few hours or days on an overnight backpacking trip, and the belt pouches are perfect for hanging from your pants belt while you cruise.  Meanwhile all the gear not in current use is padded and sealed from debris in its own padded case within the pack.
[a href=\"index.php?act=findpost&pid=173956\"][{POST_SNAPBACK}][/a]

Good advice.

My lowepro lenspouches the velcro belt attachement are not strong enough to trust IMO

I add caribinas and or electrical cable ties etc

Too much stuff on a belt can be a pain, a light harness is better (with the straps worn under a fleece) but I dont know a maufacturer of light harnesses, lowepro harnesses the belt is to thick to mix with a backpack belt

S
« Last Edit: February 11, 2008, 02:41:50 pm by Morgan_Moore »
Logged
Sam Morgan Moore Bristol UK

BruceHouston

  • Sr. Member
  • ****
  • Offline Offline
  • Posts: 308
Storing & Carrying all this stuff...
« Reply #7 on: February 11, 2008, 08:53:45 pm »

Has anyone used the ThinkTank "Rotation 360" model?

It would appear to solve the problem of quick access to a backpack by using a belt module integral to the backpack.  I just wonder if the backpack is any good (e.g., light and comfortable) and how well the system works.

Thanks,
Bruce
Logged

Josh-H

  • Sr. Member
  • ****
  • Offline Offline
  • Posts: 2054
    • Worldwide Photography Expeditions
Storing & Carrying all this stuff...
« Reply #8 on: February 11, 2008, 08:59:30 pm »

Thanks all for the replies..

I was hoping to minimise the need for multiple bags - but I have decided I need multiples to be able to choose the one which best suits the shoot on the day/weekend whatever.
Logged

JDClements

  • Sr. Member
  • ****
  • Offline Offline
  • Posts: 312
    • http://www.jdanielclements.com
Storing & Carrying all this stuff...
« Reply #9 on: February 17, 2008, 10:03:39 pm »

I use the Lowepro AW200 Sling Pack and love it. Drop a clip, swing it around, unzip, and shoot. It won't hold big glass, though.

This pack lets you deploy very quickly, so if you were walking along on a trail in the woods and saw a bear coming at you, a couple shots would be easy before running away.

I love the function of this pack so much I will probably get the larger AW300 as well.
Logged

dwdallam

  • Sr. Member
  • ****
  • Offline Offline
  • Posts: 2044
    • http://www.dwdallam.com
Storing & Carrying all this stuff...
« Reply #10 on: February 18, 2008, 04:20:30 am »

This is something we all go through, so you're in good company.

When I bought my Lowpro I thought it was going to end my problems. Wrong.

I like the design, but the waist belt is too high for my body, at 6'3". It can adjust, but it can never get down to my actual waist. So I have to wear it around my stomach, which is total crap. I pretty much gave up on it and it's in my closet. The only reason  I don't sell it is because it would be a good padded bag for carry on for airline travel. And if you have ever packed more than a few miles with 40lbs on your back--you really do need a waist belt.

Solution: By a really good backpackers solid frame backpack, and stuff your camera bag into that but first stuff it into small day packs--book backpacks. I use padded day packs, like those with padding for laptops. Nothing fancy. Now you have a very nice weight balanced pack made for packing. The weight is actually over and carried by your hips, not your shoulders and back.

When I'm shooting from my car or on very short hikes, like down to the beach or along a 1-2 mile trail, I'll put everything in my Pelican case, and then load what I need into a small padded shoulder only day pack, and just carry my tripod. You can't beat the water and dust proof O-ring sealed Pelicans for protection and storage area.

When I'm away from my truck, I lock the shell with the pelican case inside, and I use a cable lock strung through both latches on the Pelican case and through a cleet in the bottom of the bed of the truck. If someone breaks the glass to get to the inside of the truck, they then have to also have cable cutters to remove the Pelican case.

For walking around, I use a Domke Vest, not for lenses, but for other light material I use, like lens covers, a small plastic 2x2 foot tarp I use to change lenses, and other things like batteries and filters. If I need more lenses, I just stuff them into a small backpack and wear that too.
« Last Edit: February 18, 2008, 04:25:07 am by dwdallam »
Logged
Pages: [1]   Go Up