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Author Topic: First Steps with Piezography  (Read 606 times)

NortheastPhotographic

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First Steps with Piezography
« on: May 11, 2023, 10:32:19 pm »

I converted my P6000 into the Piezography Pro inkset this week.  It wasn't too bad.  They currently recommend against using their flush product.  You just load up the inks and either do a sort of hack with maintenance software...or make a series of 'purge' prints. 

I did the second method because the first requires a PC...which I have in addition to my Mac Studio but I hate windows so...I made a LOT of purge prints.  Luckily I had a lot of junky paper that was given to me so no big loss there.  The Yellow ink takes the longest to get out of the system but eventually it purged out. 

There is a bit of a learning curve to say the least!  You have to learn QTR, then learn to use Print Tool...those aren't too bad.  They also recommend you calibrate your monitor to D50...or 5000k.  I had been at 6500k for the longest time so it changes up the rest of the work I do to a certain extent...hopefully that isn't a huge issue long term.  Then you are printing from Greyscale because you apply any color tone using QTR.  You can't really soft proof...if you apply a heavy split curve in QTR and then have it 'print' to PDF, you will see nothing but the original image.  You have to make prints to see what you're doing.  I don't actually mind that so much...

I haven't gone into creating my own Quad curves yet...need to source a Color Munki before I do that, but the built in profiles are pretty good so not sure what I'll do there.  Might just have Cone in VT do the profiling for their fee.  I plan to focus on 2 papers, Platine Fiber Rag and Arches 88 from Canson. 

Anyway the results so far I have to say are promising!  I'm printing large format negatives scanned with my Eversmart Supreme II.  5x7 and 4x5 Adox CHS100II.  The detail is impressive, and it's easy to split tone.  I will say the neutral tone is noticeably cooler than a silver print on Ilford Multigrade V.  I might try introducing like 10% warmth to shadows and mids to see if I can balance it.  Absent other prints you might not notice that it's cool, but I'd say it's more comparable to Ilford cold-tone than neutral.  A 'cool' toned print to me just looks blue.  I'll need to work with the software to generate some chocolate tones as opposed to the more sepia warmth. 

Anyway I included some phone snaps to show the color tone testing I'm doing.  Would love to hear other's experiences with the system.
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deanwork

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Re: First Steps with Piezography
« Reply #1 on: May 12, 2023, 09:38:12 am »

The best way in my opinion to load the inks is to do an initial fill from the printer menu.

A few purge charts would still be necessary to flush out all the yellow channel especially. Itís hard to get that yellow out. This is something you only want to do once as it does waste quite a bit of ink.

If I were you I would hire IJM to make you the profiles, especially if you are not needing a lot of them. Those two papers you choose are exactly what I would use. They are both excellent and my favorites of them all.

I believe you can still lease the profiling software from Cone for one year and do a bunch of them, but that really does involve a learning cure and they are experts at it.

Really learning QTR and Print Tool is super easy, and super  inexpensive to buy.

Seems to me the really strong point of these inks is the subtle split-tone capability. Iím going to put them in a 3880 and do panorama work with them.

To me your neutral prints look pretty good, the cold tone looks quite strange . Iím sure you can tweak them better with a custom profile. Itís hard to judge by a screen shot though.

I canít comment on the tonal quality of the Pro inks. Iím still using K7 Carbon which will be discontinued the end of this year, unfortunately.

John





I converted my P6000 into the Piezography Pro inkset this week.  It wasn't too bad.  They currently recommend against using their flush product.  You just load up the inks and either do a sort of hack with maintenance software...or make a series of 'purge' prints. 

I did the second method because the first requires a PC...which I have in addition to my Mac Studio but I hate windows so...I made a LOT of purge prints.  Luckily I had a lot of junky paper that was given to me so no big loss there.  The Yellow ink takes the longest to get out of the system but eventually it purged out. 

There is a bit of a learning curve to say the least!  You have to learn QTR, then learn to use Print Tool...those aren't too bad.  They also recommend you calibrate your monitor to D50...or 5000k.  I had been at 6500k for the longest time so it changes up the rest of the work I do to a certain extent...hopefully that isn't a huge issue long term.  Then you are printing from Greyscale because you apply any color tone using QTR.  You can't really soft proof...if you apply a heavy split curve in QTR and then have it 'print' to PDF, you will see nothing but the original image.  You have to make prints to see what you're doing.  I don't actually mind that so much...

I haven't gone into creating my own Quad curves yet...need to source a Color Munki before I do that, but the built in profiles are pretty good so not sure what I'll do there.  Might just have Cone in VT do the profiling for their fee.  I plan to focus on 2 papers, Platine Fiber Rag and Arches 88 from Canson. 

Anyway the results so far I have to say are promising!  I'm printing large format negatives scanned with my Eversmart Supreme II.  5x7 and 4x5 Adox CHS100II.  The detail is impressive, and it's easy to split tone.  I will say the neutral tone is noticeably cooler than a silver print on Ilford Multigrade V.  I might try introducing like 10% warmth to shadows and mids to see if I can balance it.  Absent other prints you might not notice that it's cool, but I'd say it's more comparable to Ilford cold-tone than neutral.  A 'cool' toned print to me just looks blue.  I'll need to work with the software to generate some chocolate tones as opposed to the more sepia warmth. 

Anyway I included some phone snaps to show the color tone testing I'm doing.  Would love to hear other's experiences with the system.
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MfAlab

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Re: First Steps with Piezography
« Reply #2 on: May 18, 2023, 03:38:17 am »

... Iím still using K7 Carbon which will be discontinued the end of this year, unfortunately.
John

As I remember, Cone said K7 will be produced in small batch, once or twice per year. Because they "were besieged with responses" after announced the discontinued news. I still have a hope to see new more neutral carbon K7 ink. They call it "Piezography Monochrome Carbon" many years ago.
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Bozzdivine

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Re: First Steps with Piezography
« Reply #3 on: May 18, 2023, 04:42:24 am »

Hey, @NortheastPhotographic!
It's great to hear about your experience with purging and the transition to using QTR and Print Tool. I get you on the monitor calibration adjustment. It does change things up, but you'll get the hang of it soon enough.
The paper choices you mentioned are solid, both the Platine Fiber Rag and Arches 88 give beautiful prints. I've had some luck with creating custom quad curves with a Color Munki, but I'd suggest getting your feet wet with the built-in profiles first, then perhaps exploring Cone's profiling service.
The detail you mentioned with your large format negatives is exciting, and your split-toning efforts seem promising. Adjusting the warmth in shadows and mids could certainly bring the desired balance to your prints. It'll be fun to see your work with different tones, including the chocolate ones.
Keep experimenting and sharing your results. It's a joy to follow your progress. Cheers!
 
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deanwork

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Re: First Steps with Piezography
« Reply #4 on: May 18, 2023, 04:06:48 pm »

Yes, Walker said that a couple of years ago about the new K7 . I would use that ď monochrome carbon k7 ď for sure. Iím not really interested in the split tone set. He did tell me last month there is no such thing as a pure carbon neutral ( I didnít think there was ) but there is a much less warm pure carbon capability.

 MIS has been selling an Ebony 6 warm-neutral value carbon for a long time that looked good and  tested really really  well at Aardenburg many years ago. But the only time I tried Ebony it badly clogged my Epson so Iíll never go there again. Also found MIS to be totally impossible to get a response from. I bought a bad ink cart from them and no one would ever answer my emails. That happened with me more than once.

Inkjet Mall is  very responsive and will always stand behind the products they sell, and they have that great profile library to draw from.


John


As I remember, Cone said K7 will be produced in small batch, once or twice per year. Because they "were besieged with responses" after announced the discontinued news. I still have a hope to see new more neutral carbon K7 ink. They call it "Piezography Monochrome Carbon" many years ago.
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MfAlab

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Re: First Steps with Piezography
« Reply #5 on: May 24, 2023, 10:07:15 pm »

Yes, Walker said that a couple of years ago about the new K7 . I would use that ď monochrome carbon k7 ď for sure. Iím not really interested in the split tone set. He did tell me last month there is no such thing as a pure carbon neutral ( I didnít think there was ) but there is a much less warm pure carbon capability.
John

I'm waiting the monochrome carbon K7 too. Actually, Piezography Pro is K4 system. Sell well, but that doesn't appeal to me at all. Everybody could use an OEM K4 printer without warranty risk on P10000/P20000.
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deanwork

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Re: First Steps with Piezography
« Reply #6 on: May 25, 2023, 03:29:47 pm »

Yea, the P20k and 10k are already k4 inksets, with all the color capability in one inkset. Thatís what I wanted them to do with the 9570 but they screwed all that up and put in a Violet. Wouldnít buy a 9570 anyway. They are a disaster.


I'm waiting the monochrome carbon K7 too. Actually, Piezography Pro is K4 system. Sell well, but that doesn't appeal to me at all. Everybody could use an OEM K4 printer without warranty risk on P10000/P20000.
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