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Author Topic: Using LR Classic.How can I keep the File size from going lower than the original  (Read 818 times)

rollsman44

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When I import my Images from my card reader and Make some adjustments and then I go to Export. I tried a few ways when exporting and I still lose file size by quite a bit.  Thanks
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digitaldog

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When I import my Images from my card reader and Make some adjustments and then I go to Export. I tried a few ways when exporting and I still lose file size by quite a bit.  Thanks
Show us a screenshot of your export settings.
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Alan Klein

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"Resize to Fit" should be unchecked in the Export window selections.

mcbroomf

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Are you referring to pixel size (MP) or file size (MB)?
What are you exporting to, jpgs, tifs, something else?
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Alan Klein

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Are you referring to pixel size (MP) or file size (MB)?
What are you exporting to, jpgs, tifs, something else?
See attached picture. Uncheck the box to get full image pixel resolution when you save it.  Check the box and set the sizes if you want something different.
 

mcbroomf

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Good screen capture.  I hope that helps the OP who is the one I was directing my questions. 

He still doesn't comment on if he's referring to number of pixels or the file size (with no pixel loss).  If the latter that's a whole new discussion about tiff vs jpg vs quality etc
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digitaldog

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He still doesn't comment on if he's referring to number of pixels or the file size (with no pixel loss).  If the latter that's a whole new discussion about tiff vs jpg vs quality etc
Until he shows us his Export settings we are all guessing.
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rollsman44

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  Thank you everyone. File size vs MP  ?   I never thought about these 2 being different. My goal is to send the Biggest file size to the Lab to get 16x20 or 20 x24 Photo. Need it to be the Best image i can send them .  This might sound stupid BUT can you explain what the difference is between the 2 and which one I should use in jpg form to send to the lab for the Best possible prints.   Thank you   
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Alan Klein

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You might ask the printer what works best for them.

digitaldog

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  Thank you everyone. File size vs MP  ?   I never thought about these 2 being different. My goal is to send the Biggest file size to the Lab to get 16x20 or 20 x24 Photo. Need it to be the Best image i can send them .  This might sound stupid BUT can you explain what the difference is between the 2 and which one I should use in jpg form to send to the lab for the Best possible prints.   Thank you
First, work with actual, exact pixels of your capture. Not MP which isn't precise.
In LR, you can set up the info overlay to show you exactly the number of pixels based on the cropped (if cropped) image as seen below.
You want a 24-inch print. How many pixels can you divide into 24? You want anywhere from a low of 180 pixels per inch for that output. If you don't have enough for that minimum, you'll need to interpolate up which LR can do pretty well within limits. If you have 4320 pixels, you've got that minimum. And anything higher, great.
JPEG compression reduces image quality. IF the lab demands JPEG, well you'll have to do so but this is a good guide to LR's JPEG settings on export:
http://regex.info/blog/lightroom-goodies/jpeg-quality
Also examine this excellent article on resolution and printing:
https://www.digitalphotopro.com/technique/photography-workflow/the-right-resolution/
« Last Edit: June 05, 2022, 10:29:01 am by digitaldog »
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rollsman44

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  Thank you everyone.  It surely Helps me.   Dennis
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Slobodan Blagojevic

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...image as seen below...

Thanks for that lovely image, Andrew  ;)
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