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Author Topic: Wakeenah Falls  (Read 229 times)

Two23

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Wakeenah Falls
« on: November 27, 2021, 10:49:40 am »

Wakeenah Falls,
Oregon


For panoramas I generally use my Nikon 24mm shift lens.  I take three shots, (left, center, right) and stitch in PS.  This works very well for waterfalls too by shooting vertically.  Since I'm used to using the movements on an 8x10 field camera the Nikon shift lenses are a perfect fit for me.  Yes, it takes time to set up and level a tripod, use the camera in manual mode (to keep exposures the same in all three shots), and take three photos.  I think extra care results in photos that have a different look from what the other thousand people took of the same place that day.


Kent in SD
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Eric Myrvaagnes

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Re: Wakeenah Falls
« Reply #1 on: November 27, 2021, 01:25:36 pm »

Looks very nice to my eyes.
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jeffreybehr

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Re: Wakeenah Falls
« Reply #2 on: November 27, 2021, 02:31:26 pm »

Wakeenah Falls,
Oregon

For panoramas I generally use my Nikon 24mm shift lens.  I take three shots, (left, center, right) and stitch in PS.  This works very well for waterfalls too by shooting vertically.  Since I'm used to using the movements on an 8x10 field camera the Nikon shift lenses are a perfect fit for me.  Yes, it takes time to set up and level a tripod, use the camera in manual mode (to keep exposures the same in all three shots), and take three photos.  I think extra care results in photos that have a different look from what the other thousand people took of the same place that day.

Kent in SD

Indeed; and you used a shutter speed fast enough to make the falling water look like water instead of, say, carbondioxide gas.  NICE pic.  And I too have been using TS lenses for decades, all Canons.
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Two23

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Re: Wakeenah Falls
« Reply #3 on: November 27, 2021, 08:55:58 pm »

Indeed; and you used a shutter speed fast enough to make the falling water look like water instead of, say, carbondioxide gas.  NICE pic.  And I too have been using TS lenses for decades, all Canons.


Funny you mention shutter speed.  I too generally dislike the long exposure waterfalls.  I like to put a little "life" into them.  The ironic thing is for the past two years I've mostly been shooting wet plate collodion.  Exposures can easily run 10 seconds.  With wet plate I have no choice as the medium is something like ISO 1 or 2.  Waterfalls have been photo'd that way since the 1850s.  From my POV it's time to start doing something different. :)


Kent in SD
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MattBurt

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Re: Wakeenah Falls
« Reply #4 on: December 01, 2021, 12:20:20 pm »

Nicely done!
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Eric Myrvaagnes

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Re: Wakeenah Falls
« Reply #5 on: December 01, 2021, 05:11:56 pm »

I also appreciate a fast enough shutter speed so the water looks real.
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