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Author Topic: Eizo monitor: what color space?  (Read 640 times)

ymc226

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Eizo monitor: what color space?
« on: November 03, 2021, 08:29:21 pm »

My editing goal is for the print, almost exclusively on matte papers (currently Canson Rag Photographique and Epson Hot Press Bright).  I use LR Classic with a ProPhoto RGB colorspace.  Going to update my old NEC PA monitors to the Eizo CS2740 which have the option of native, Adobe RBG and ProPhoto RBG among others.  This YouTube video recommends using the "native" color space in monitor calibration but would any of the more conventional color spaces be more appropriate?Rocco Ancora takes us through ColorNavigator 7: EIZO Monitor calibration for photography workflows
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simon.garrett@iee.org

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Re: Eizo monitor: what color space?
« Reply #1 on: November 04, 2021, 05:06:36 am »

My editing goal is for the print, almost exclusively on matte papers (currently Canson Rag Photographique and Epson Hot Press Bright).  I use LR Classic with a ProPhoto RGB colorspace.  Going to update my old NEC PA monitors to the Eizo CS2740 which have the option of native, Adobe RBG and ProPhoto RBG among others.  This YouTube video recommends using the "native" color space in monitor calibration but would any of the more conventional color spaces be more appropriate?Rocco Ancora takes us through ColorNavigator 7: EIZO Monitor calibration for photography workflows

Personally, I always calibrate in native space.  That's the widest colour space the monitor can handle, so shows the maximum gamut of colours.

The only (in my view minor) problem with native space is that the montor may well display some colours that the printer can't display.  However, printers (subtractive colour) and monitors (emissive colour) are different anyway, and so this is an unavoidable problem.  You can never get a monitor very close to the actual colour space of a printer.  I think soft proofing is the best way to come close to seeing what one will get on a printer (or any other device with a different colour space to the monitor). 

Working on the image in the widest possible gamut is (in my view) the best way of future-proofing one's workflow.  Perhaps now the target is a particular rag paper, but what if you want to use something different for the image in future? 
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kers

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    • Pieter Kers
Re: Eizo monitor: what color space?
« Reply #2 on: November 06, 2021, 06:48:37 am »

+1 - Eizo gives so many options that it might be confusing.
But then it is a professional screen used for many different purposes.
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Pieter Kers
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JRSmit

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    • Jan R. Smit Fine Art Printing Specialist
Re: Eizo monitor: what color space?
« Reply #3 on: November 06, 2021, 10:08:24 am »

Native!
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Jan R. Smit

ymc226

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Re: Eizo monitor: what color space?
« Reply #4 on: November 06, 2021, 08:19:26 pm »

Thank you everyone.  I just received my 2 Eizo monitors and they are very nicely built.  Downloaded the ColorNavigator software and calibrated very easily.  Now just need to adjust calibration parameters to fit my prints.
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Doug Gray

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Re: Eizo monitor: what color space?
« Reply #5 on: November 07, 2021, 06:12:21 pm »

What I find works great is to put the print light box next to the monitor then:

1. Put a blank sheet of print paper using one w/o fluorescent brightners and that you have a profile for.
2. Open up Photoshop and create a large, white image. Tag it with ProPhoto RGB.
3. Select view proof custom and select the paper profile and absolute Colorimetric and view paper color.
4. Set the Eizo CN CD/M^2 so the brightness matches that of the white image in Photoshop.
5. Adjust the xy coordinates (shifts color tint) to match the view box. Set the minimum monitor luminance to lowest.

Iterate steps 4 and 5 to get a white match between the view box and Photoshop.

Now, save that ColorNavigator setting. This should work on any paper that doesn't have OBEs. Glossy or matte. When you soft proof with show paper color the black point will automatically shift to the paper profile you are using. Papers with OBE's are a different critter. Best avoided.
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degrub

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Re: Eizo monitor: what color space?
« Reply #6 on: November 07, 2021, 07:18:58 pm »

Cataracts will give you a yellow filter if you have them.
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