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Author Topic: embedded profile identification  (Read 575 times)

rasworth

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embedded profile identification
« on: June 18, 2021, 09:54:20 am »

I primarily work in ACR and Photoshop, occasionally dabble in Lightroom, Lightroom Classic, DXO, etc.  As far as I can determine only Photoshop provides means to identify the embedded profile.  I find myself often opening jpgs and tifs in Photoshop, not to edit, but to reveal the embedded profile.  I understand there are numerous specialized programs that will identify the profile, but why the lack in mainstream editing programs?  Even using Windows file explorer to extract properties from a picture file only shows sRGB, all others are lumped into "uncalibrated".  Many programs will let you specify a destination workspace, but hide the embedded version.  Is this just an oversight by program developers, or an overt attempt to hide color management complexities from simple minded users?

Richard Southworth
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digitaldog

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Re: embedded profile identification
« Reply #1 on: June 18, 2021, 10:46:18 am »

Generally, an overt attempt to hide color management complexities from simple minded users.
What is important is that there is an embedded profile and it's used?
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rasworth

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Re: embedded profile identification
« Reply #2 on: June 18, 2021, 12:49:00 pm »

Except when there isn't an embedded profile only Photoshop provides the option to warn the user and allow assignment.  AFAIK the rest assume sRGB for all mystery meat.

Richard Southworth
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digitaldog

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Re: embedded profile identification
« Reply #3 on: June 18, 2021, 01:11:45 pm »

Except when there isn't an embedded profile only Photoshop provides the option to warn the user and allow assignment.  AFAIK the rest assume sRGB for all mystery meat.

Richard Southworth
Untagged data is (in this color model) RGB mystery meat. Something HAS to be assumed in color managed applications. Today, the 'best' assumption is sRGB.
Outside of Photoshop, that's still the best assumption.
No warning really needed unless you want to assign a profile to untagged data visually and that means Photoshop (or some application that can assign profiles).
Now it IS possible to find all untagged images, at least on Mac and at least using a tool like Hazel as shown below. So there has to be some metadata in images that fit that criteria. I use Hazel to scan images that are untagged and it then adds a comment in each document as such. Targets and some images should be untagged but for most users, they don't really need this kind of filtering.
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Stephen G

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Re: embedded profile identification
« Reply #4 on: June 21, 2021, 04:31:28 am »

Qimage Ultimate does it. Just hover over any file, or any image in the print layout space and it reports all kinds of info, including embedded space, at the bottom of the window.
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