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Author Topic: Seven Peaks...  (Read 252 times)

Rayyan

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Seven Peaks...
« on: September 06, 2020, 02:00:48 pm »



The highest peak is around 8,800 mts. above sea level.

Call it Sagarmatha or Chomolungma.
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RSL

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Re: Seven Peaks...
« Reply #1 on: September 06, 2020, 03:01:06 pm »

A beautiful but forbidding place, Rayyan.
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Russ Lewis  www.russ-lewis.com.

francois

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Re: Seven Peaks...
« Reply #2 on: September 07, 2020, 03:55:26 am »

Top of the world! Glorious shot, I like it.
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Francois

Rayyan

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Re: Seven Peaks...
« Reply #3 on: September 07, 2020, 08:09:28 am »

Russ, Francois..

Thank you both.

The image was taken by my wife.
She was between 5900-6000 mts. And climbing.

She made it to about 6200 mts.
The descent was even more arduous, she tells me.

Stay safe. Stay well.
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francois

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Re: Seven Peaks...
« Reply #4 on: September 07, 2020, 10:13:35 am »

Thanks for additional information. 6200m is already a very high altitude. I'm not sure that I could climb that high without serious side effects. Glad that your wife had enough energy left to take the shot and then get back down safely.
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Francois

Eric Myrvaagnes

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Re: Seven Peaks...
« Reply #5 on: September 07, 2020, 02:29:28 pm »

The highest I ever climbed to (when I was much younger) was 4024 m  (13200 ft).    :(
That was pretty high for in the continental U.S.A.
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-Eric Myrvaagnes (visit my website: http://myrvaagnes.com)

RSL

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Re: Seven Peaks...
« Reply #6 on: September 07, 2020, 03:00:43 pm »

If you're gonna climb to 6,000 m, which is approximately 19,700 feet, you need oxygen. Pikes Peak is only 14,100 feet (about 4297 m) and people sometimes pass out in the summit house. In pilot training I remember a solo night cross-country flight at 25,000 feet (about 7,620 m) in a T33 (the two-seat, trainer version of the F80). I noticed that the lights on the ground were becoming dimmer and dimmer. I checked my oxygen mask and it was secure. I reached down in the cockpit to where the oxygen hose connected to the pressurized system. It was disconnected. I popped my bailout bottle, a bottle of compressed oxygen connected to your parachute harness to get you down without passing out if you have to eject at high altitude, and descended immediately to about 6,000 feet. The lights on the ground suddenly got brighter. That experience was sort of an preview to losing a wingman in Korea because his F84 oxygen system failed at 35,000 feet. He passed out, didn't come to and the airplane augered in. Becoming hypoxic is something you don't notice is happening.
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Russ Lewis  www.russ-lewis.com.
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