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Author Topic: Soft Proofing MK Paper  (Read 1325 times)

BobDavid

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Soft Proofing MK Paper
« on: July 22, 2020, 12:55:24 pm »

Quick question: Is there a better way to soft proof files to be printed on MK paper that's better than what's available through PS?
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digitaldog

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Re: Soft Proofing MK Paper
« Reply #1 on: July 22, 2020, 01:07:18 pm »

Well Lightroom allows output specific edits with Virtual Copies (Proof Copies) and when you then print, the rendering intent and those edits are used. But solely for visual purposes, PS is fine. I prefer the darker UI in LR.
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JRSmit

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Re: Soft Proofing MK Paper
« Reply #2 on: July 22, 2020, 01:24:18 pm »

Quick question: Is there a better way to soft proof files to be printed on MK paper that's better than what's available through PS?
In what way better? What is it you are missing or want to be improved?
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HarveyM43

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Re: Soft Proofing MK Paper
« Reply #3 on: July 22, 2020, 02:11:18 pm »

Not sure it's better, but Affinity Photo does it as an adjustment layer. That lets you create several layers (of different papers or rendering intents) and quickly compare one to the other.
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TeamG

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Re: Soft Proofing MK Paper
« Reply #4 on: August 10, 2020, 06:13:59 pm »

At this link Les Walkling has a video walkthrough of setting up an Eizo monitor for softproofing "Advanced Soft Proofing Monitor Calibration Video".  If the monitor you use allows the same level of calibration/customisation then it's extremely good
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JRSmit

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Re: Soft Proofing MK Paper
« Reply #5 on: August 12, 2020, 06:46:57 am »

At this link Les Walkling has a video walkthrough of setting up an Eizo monitor for softproofing "Advanced Soft Proofing Monitor Calibration Video".  If the monitor you use allows the same level of calibration/customisation then it's extremely good
went through his articles ,and can only disagree. He begins with a ‘sheet of white paper’. Please specify ‘a sheet of white paper’, more specifically ‘white’.
Secondly softproofing is about how the colors on the print will look like using given print profile, and this on the monitor or display with its limitations.
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TeamG

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Re: Soft Proofing MK Paper
« Reply #6 on: August 18, 2020, 02:41:16 am »

went through his articles ,and can only disagree. He begins with a ‘sheet of white paper’. Please specify ‘a sheet of white paper’, more specifically ‘white’.
Secondly softproofing is about how the colors on the print will look like using given print profile, and this on the monitor or display with its limitations.

Hi sorry for the late reply

I've see Les in action with this process.  The white paper is whatever paper stock you're going to print too.  Dial it in to the whiteness of the paper depending on if its a warmer mat paper or a cooler gloss paper and save monitor profiles for each.

The intent is to print an unmodified test chart using the ICC profile and matching paper, and then adjust the monitor's brightness, tone/tint, and then individual colour channels to match the paper specifically for the task of soft proofing

So he starts following the ISO standard to calibrate for printing under D50 conditions, but then goes further for soft proofing because not many of us have conditions that also match the ISO standard

Anyway, for soft proofing, if you have the monitor for it, it's very effective
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JRSmit

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Re: Soft Proofing MK Paper
« Reply #7 on: August 18, 2020, 08:51:02 am »

Matching the monitor White point to that of the paper in a controlled lightning setup  is ok, but not so for papers with OBA's.
What about black point? Paper has a conserably different black point. Thus a different contrast. Fiddling with colors to mimick visually the print, comes across as fault prime.
Is do not see the advantage of the procedure you describe, the softproof function in Lightroom works ok, it is far from perfect, but it takes info account the printer-paper profile.
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digitaldog

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Re: Soft Proofing MK Paper
« Reply #8 on: August 18, 2020, 11:28:54 am »

Matching the monitor White point to that of the paper in a controlled lightning setup  is ok, but not so for papers with OBA's.
Yes and the suggestion to just view the paper while somewhat effective outside this condition fails to provide a better approach; output a few color reference images on the paper and adjust the calibration to result in a match for those images while soft proofing correctly (paper and ink simulation used). The paper alone doesn't provide enough visual data. It's only one part of the process. Of course, having FULL control over white (even the xy axis), contrast ratio (black) is key and not all software or displays provide this granularity of control over calibration.
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TeamG

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Re: Soft Proofing MK Paper
« Reply #9 on: August 18, 2020, 05:47:52 pm »

I guess I was answering if there was a better way to soft proof and after trying it I found it to be better. Lightroom is close, this is closer - not talking a game of inches if something is perfect, just if something is better :)

Give it a go and see what you think 
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