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Author Topic: Monochrome printing  (Read 247 times)

Jonathan Cross

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Monochrome printing
« on: July 01, 2020, 02:11:50 am »

When printing black and white on matte or silk paper can one tell if the image is 8 bit or 16 bit?  My printer will print 16 bit.  Can one tell if the image is jpeg, 8 bit tiff, 16 bit tiff, or printed in Lightroom after processing RAW?  I don't want to waste paper trying, if one of the experts has the answer!

Best wishes,

Jonathan
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Jonathan in UK

kers

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Re: Monochrome printing
« Reply #1 on: July 01, 2020, 08:32:22 am »

depends: jpeg heavely compressed wil not look good; jpeg 100% will only differ in very rare occasions.
8 bit or 16 bit tiff - never saw difference... But be sure you don't have banding (in skies)... so develop 16 bit and bring it down to 8 bit.
Banding can also be introduced with a bad profile in the printer - without being in the image itself.
Some problems are more pronounced to see in print than on screen; like banding;  the look of grain is reduced in print.
Since in BW you have no colours to cover up certain problems, and you work with fewer inks, i would suggest to work in 16 bit always... to be on the safe side- if you can.
« Last Edit: July 01, 2020, 08:36:24 am by kers »
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Alan Klein

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Re: Monochrome printing
« Reply #2 on: July 01, 2020, 10:15:04 am »

depends: jpeg heavely compressed wil not look good; jpeg 100% will only differ in very rare occasions.
8 bit or 16 bit tiff - never saw difference... But be sure you don't have banding (in skies)... so develop 16 bit and bring it down to 8 bit.
Banding can also be introduced with a bad profile in the printer - without being in the image itself.
Some problems are more pronounced to see in print than on screen; like banding;  the look of grain is reduced in print.
Since in BW you have no colours to cover up certain problems, and you work with fewer inks, i would suggest to work in 16 bit always... to be on the safe side- if you can.

Pieter, When I create a jpeg from editing a tiff photo, if I set around 92 or 93, the total size is about equal to the size of the original tiff in bytes.  However, between 93 and 100, the jpeg file size gets larger and larger.  Do you know what's going on at 93 and above?
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