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Author Topic: Film Again!  (Read 847 times)

ajz

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Film Again!
« on: June 23, 2020, 11:05:38 am »

I've the itch to shoot B&W film again, since I last did so in the early 1990's! I have a few (recent) rolls of Ilford Delta 100 & 400 film plus boxes of Tmax 400 (35mm & 120). In the past I used D-76  or HC-110. However, I would like to pick one developer for both the Tmax and the Ilford films if possible. Eventually I will settle on Ilford film. I realize there may be issues of grain vs. sharpness depending upon the developer, but would appreciate suggestions from those currently developing film. Stop baths, fixers would be appropriate to the developer?

Suggestions would get me started again into what I once enjoyed.
thanks

aj

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hogloff

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Re: Film Again!
« Reply #1 on: June 23, 2020, 07:13:47 pm »

I've the itch to shoot B&W film again, since I last did so in the early 1990's! I have a few (recent) rolls of Ilford Delta 100 & 400 film plus boxes of Tmax 400 (35mm & 120). In the past I used D-76  or HC-110. However, I would like to pick one developer for both the Tmax and the Ilford films if possible. Eventually I will settle on Ilford film. I realize there may be issues of grain vs. sharpness depending upon the developer, but would appreciate suggestions from those currently developing film. Stop baths, fixers would be appropriate to the developer?

Suggestions would get me started again into what I once enjoyed.
thanks

aj

Why not use the process you did when you shot film? Same developers, stops and fixers.
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Paul_Roark

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Re: Film Again!
« Reply #2 on: June 28, 2020, 11:16:29 am »

I've the itch to shoot B&W film again, ...

I've started to make digital copies of my old medium format film negatives.  What I found is that the dilute developer techniques I used in the darkroom era to increase the sharpness of large prints is not appropriate for the digital age.  It's a lot easier to sharpen an older image digitally than it is to suppress the grain that results from dilute development and relatively less frequent agitation.  So, if you think you might want to ultimately make digital prints from these negatives, I would recommend you use the manufacturer's full strength developer recommendations.

Enjoy,

Paul
www.PaulRoark.com

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KenS

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Re: Film Again!
« Reply #3 on: July 04, 2020, 06:37:37 pm »

Recently I've been scanning my T-Max 100 medium format shots developed in T-Max developer (some shot at early at 1987 with a Pentax 67).
I have found that using Topaz AI Clear to reduce grain AND increase sharpness works very well.  After applying AI Clear (an option in Topaz Denoise AI) I use SRDx as a Photoshop plug-in to eliminate dust and scratches.  This has been working out well also.   SRDx has saved me a huge amount of time and frustration that I previously spent on cleaning the film and scanner carrier, then tediously removing dust from the scanned image.  Typically after SRDx I only spend 5-10 more minutes with the healing brush to get rid of the remaining dust and scratches.  Remaining processing is done in Photoshop and then off to my printer or my website.
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