Pages: [1]   Go Down

Author Topic: Coating Prints Question  (Read 549 times)

Kemosabe

  • Newbie
  • *
  • Offline Offline
  • Posts: 6
Coating Prints Question
« on: May 29, 2020, 03:21:03 pm »

Has anyone applied a full coating of Canon's Chroma Optimizer on a print printed with a Pro 1000, 2000, 4000, 6000 series large format printer and then sprayed a liquid laminate protective coating on top of of that CO coated print?  If so what was the result? 
Logged

tharrington

  • Newbie
  • *
  • Offline Offline
  • Posts: 20
Re: Coating Prints Question
« Reply #1 on: May 29, 2020, 04:24:45 pm »

I actually do this with all of my prints now... well, when I print to satin/silk/luster surfaces. I think the end result is much more pleasing. Iím using the pro-4000.
Logged

Kemosabe

  • Newbie
  • *
  • Offline Offline
  • Posts: 6
Re: Coating Prints Question
« Reply #2 on: May 29, 2020, 05:45:12 pm »

I print on the Pro-4000 also.  It just dawned on me that I may not have to spray a Solvent based liquid laminate protective coat 1st.   Some papers bleed if you apply an aqueous based coating 1st.  The solvent based laminate will stop the bleeding and once it sets you can then spray the aqueous based protective coating directly onto the print.  If the CO can act as the 1st layer in place of the solvent base laminate to prevent bleeding that saves a lot of time/work and is very efficient.  I would only have to spray once.  That would eliminate an entire application step along with having to clean the spray gun plus reduce the likelihood of dust contamination.  Sweet.....

tharrington, thank you for your input.  Why didn't I think of this 2 years ago?
« Last Edit: May 29, 2020, 05:49:00 pm by Kemosabe »
Logged

I.T. Supplies

  • Sr. Member
  • ****
  • Offline Offline
  • Posts: 519
Re: Coating Prints Question
« Reply #3 on: June 03, 2020, 05:21:24 pm »

The CO is no way a coating or does it act like one.  It's mainly like the colors, but a clear "ink" that helps with providing a more uniformed level of glare across the image.  You can either have it apply to the spaces that are technically white and won't receive any color, apply to the whole image or be able to turn the option off from the MCT Canon created to make a custom media type.

Most sprays or roll-on are usually a solvent based type.  It really depends on how you apply the coating (especially roll-on) since too much on the roll with more than expected pressure can "peel" the ink off (for example), or may not dry properly.

You can still do a couple coats of spray to help it apply better, but the CO "is not" a coating option.  The chemicals in coating are much different than an ink formula which is why coating manufacturers make them aside from ink manufacturer.
Logged

deanwork

  • Sr. Member
  • ****
  • Offline Offline
  • Posts: 1920
Re: Coating Prints Question
« Reply #4 on: June 03, 2020, 07:11:39 pm »


I guess the term ďcoatingĒ is a matter of semantics.

Although I donít have one of the new Canons, the very good review on the On Site website suggests that if you choose the appropriate media setting for a particular paper type ( this is critical ) the gloss enhancer channel does a quite good job of removing gloss differential and bronzing issues.

I know on my HpZ printers the GE channel does an excellent job in smoothing out these effects on all the fiber gloss media and an even better job on rc media. I would hope that the Canon GO would do the same. Since Iím using an older Canon I canít say for certain. I know my 8300 produces results that are about the same as Epson output.

Having said all that, for portfolio prints that are to be held in the hands I almost always add an additional two light coats of the Premiere Art solvent spray, especially for black and white. It also makes them more durable. So there is an additional improvement with papers like Platine or Canson Baryta even with the HP Z inks.

John




I print on the Pro-4000 also.  It just dawned on me that I may not have to spray a Solvent based liquid laminate protective coat 1st.   Some papers bleed if you apply an aqueous based coating 1st.  The solvent based laminate will stop the bleeding and once it sets you can then spray the aqueous based protective coating directly onto the print.  If the CO can act as the 1st layer in place of the solvent base laminate to prevent bleeding that saves a lot of time/work and is very efficient.  I would only have to spray once.  That would eliminate an entire application step along with having to clean the spray gun plus reduce the likelihood of dust contamination.  Sweet.....

tharrington, thank you for your input.  Why didn't I think of this 2 years ago?
Logged

tharrington

  • Newbie
  • *
  • Offline Offline
  • Posts: 20
Re: Coating Prints Question
« Reply #5 on: June 04, 2020, 09:13:11 pm »

Kemosabe- I may have misunderstood your question... and sorry if I did. My answer is still the same. Even with a custom profile and CO over the entire print, I still find a spray varnish takes things up a notch. One way or the other, I hope it works out well for you.
Logged
Pages: [1]   Go Up