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Author Topic: Nikon F100--film camera and older Nikkor 50mm lens---not able to separate  (Read 584 times)

raymond bleesz

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I recently mounted an older Nikkor lens (not an up to date AI lens--but a lens dating from the 1970's perhaps--a lens which was mounted on a Nikkormats camera). When mounted all looked normal as well as the sounds associated with the mounting. But it does have that AI looking tab on the lens barrel.)(perhaps a non CPU lens)

It is my understanding that to take off the  lens, one would need to push the "dismounted button" on the body of the camera and have the aperture ring on the lens dialed into F16, its smallest aperture and turn the lens in a counter clockwise twist more or less in unison. Also the camera should be on the "m" mode. When the above action is taken, the lens become somewhat loose on the mount as if ready to dismount, however, the lens will not come apart from the body even though it should and feels like it should.

There is nothing absolutely wrong with the F100---it's the older 50mm lens which is the issue on this body.

What are your suggestions in getting this older lens off this F100 body???  Your thoughts???

One item may be worth stating. The aperture ring on the lens will rotate from f2. to f16 without any issues--all normal. But in closer look, when the aperture is turned to the f2 setting, the alignment of the "2" does not sit exactly opposite the "dot" on the barrel. All other f stops rest directly across one another.

50mm Nikkor H lens  auto 1:2  serial number 2119986

Raymond in Colorado
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Rob C

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Re: Nikon F100--film camera and older Nikkor 50mm lens---not able to separate
« Reply #1 on: February 16, 2020, 05:41:23 pm »

I had one of those 2/50mm jobs; wish I'd kept it.

If the lens won't come off, try relocating it fully in place and run the aperture ring up and down a few times; there may be slack in the movement that's stopping it from coming off properly. That little forked tab used to connect with a pin and operate the metering if you used a metering pentaprism, if my memory is still working correctly. That's why the lens had to be attached with the ring at the recommended aperture, which I think was wide open. That allowed it to mate correctly. In fact, now that I think about it, I still fit a lens on my digital bodies only with the aperture wide open.

After use, I always open the aperture to the max again, both because it makes later swaps easy, but also because I remember reading that it weakens the mechanism if you leave the lens in stopped-down mode after use.

I think the same applied to the Hasselblad 500 Series bodiies too: always fitted lenses with the aperture wide open. How strange how easily one forgets things that were done a thousand times without a conscious thought! Or it might just be me.

Rob

Martin Kristiansen

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    • Martin Kristiansen
Re: Nikon F100--film camera and older Nikkor 50mm lens---not able to separate
« Reply #2 on: February 16, 2020, 11:55:06 pm »

Not just you Rob.
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fdisilvestro

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Re: Nikon F100--film camera and older Nikkor 50mm lens---not able to separate
« Reply #3 on: February 17, 2020, 09:34:22 pm »

Hi,

Do you still have the issue? Could you post a picture showing the lens mounted on the camera, showing the part of the AI indexing tab?

One test: Does the Depth Of Field preview works correctly? (Stopping down the lens when you press it)

Notes:

On modern film Nikon Cameras (post 1977) you can mount the lens regardless of the position of the aperture ring (As long as the lens is AI, AI-S original or converted), there is no need to position it at a specific value and you don't need to open it to the max aperture, as it was required in the old photomic finders (pre-1977).

It also does not mater if you have it in manual or aperture priority as the lens does not have CPU contacts. (Just make sure manual focus is selected always when using that lens)



mcbroomf

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Re: Nikon F100--film camera and older Nikkor 50mm lens---not able to separate
« Reply #4 on: February 18, 2020, 06:07:15 am »


It is my understanding that to take off the  lens, one would need to push the "dismounted button" on the body of the camera and have the aperture ring on the lens dialed into F16, its smallest aperture and turn the lens in a counter clockwise twist more or less in unison. Also the camera should be on the "m" mode. When the above action is taken, the lens become somewhat loose on the mount as if ready to dismount, however, the lens will not come apart from the body even though it should and feels like it should.


Unless that is a typo you are turning the lens in the wrong direction.  Nikon mounts opposite to other camera systems.  Not sure about the F stop or camera mode though.
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Rob C

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Re: Nikon F100--film camera and older Nikkor 50mm lens---not able to separate
« Reply #5 on: February 18, 2020, 02:08:09 pm »

Unless that is a typo you are turning the lens in the wrong direction.  Nikon mounts opposite to other camera systems.  Not sure about the F stop or camera mode though.


That's a very good point, and shows how one can read something and not pick up on a huge flaw (direction of twist!) despite having used Nikons for decades, and still having them!

Rob

fdisilvestro

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Re: Nikon F100--film camera and older Nikkor 50mm lens---not able to separate
« Reply #6 on: February 18, 2020, 02:16:07 pm »

Rotation orientation depends if you are looking from the front or from the back of the camera.
If you are actually able to rotate a Nikon f-mount lens the wrong way, then there is something seriously wrong with the lens or camera.
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